stockpricecheck

stock price check

get company stock

http://dev.markitondemand.com/MODApis/Api/v2/Lookup/json?input=NFLX

Takes a CSV file of stock symbols and requests stock details - saving the results as json file.

The CSV file for symbols:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bz6bXrUgcavndFhFTUhxMll3bE0/view?usp=sharing

http://eoddata.com/stocklist/NYSE/B.htm

In [47]:
import requests 
import bs4
import csv
#import tsv
import time
import getpass
In [48]:
myusr = getpass.getuser()
In [25]:
stksym = list()
In [26]:
with open('/home/pi/naradsplit.csv', 'r') as fedz:
    #fed = csv.reader(fedz)
    reader = csv.DictReader(fedz)
    for row in reader:
        #print(row)
        stksym.append(row['Symbol'])
    #print(fed.)
    
In [52]:
#stksym
In [53]:
#try:
#    for stk in stksym:
#        eqap = requests.get('http://dev.markitondemand.com/MODApis/Api/v2/Quote/json?symbol={}'.format(stk))
#        print(reqap.json())

#except ValueError:
#    pass
#    print('passed')
#print "Great, you successfully entered an integer!"
In [ ]:
#print(reqap.json())
In [51]:
for stk in stksym:
    #print(stk)
        #reqap = requests.get('http://dev.markitondemand.com/MODApis/Api/v2/Quote/json?symbol={}'.format(stk))
    quotesym = requests.get('http://dev.markitondemand.com/MODApis/Api/v2/Quote/json?symbol=' + stk)
    qujs = (quotesym.json())
    if 'Name' in qujs:
        print(quotesym.json())
        with open('/home/{}/stockprice/{}.json'.format(myusr, qujs['Symbol']), 'w') as stprc:
            stprc.write(str(quotesym.json()))
            
    time.sleep(1)
        #elif ValueError:
        #    pass
A
{'Volume': 1136658, 'ChangePercentYTD': 7.24707007892849, 'Timestamp': 'Tue Dec 6 16:03:00 UTC-05:00 2016', 'Low': 44.2, 'ChangeYTD': 41.81, 'MarketCap': 14528160000, 'Name': 'Agilent Technologies Inc', 'High': 44.9, 'Open': 44.58, 'LastPrice': 44.84, 'Symbol': 'A', 'Change': 0.310000000000002, 'MSDate': 42710.66875, 'Status': 'SUCCESS', 'ChangePercent': 0.696159892207506}
AA
{'Volume': 4406535, 'ChangePercentYTD': -31.3745356298548, 'Timestamp': 'Tue Dec 6 16:01:00 UTC-05:00 2016', 'Low': 19.7, 'ChangeYTD': 29.61, 'MarketCap': 8909872960, 'Name': 'Arconic Inc', 'High': 20.34, 'Open': 19.89, 'LastPrice': 20.32, 'Symbol': 'ARNC', 'Change': 0.0599999999999987, 'MSDate': 42710.6673611111, 'Status': 'SUCCESS', 'ChangePercent': 0.296150049358335}
AAAP
AAC
{'Volume': 202300, 'ChangePercentYTD': -55.299055613851, 'Timestamp': 'Tue Dec 6 16:02:00 UTC-05:00 2016', 'Low': 8.36, 'ChangeYTD': 19.06, 'MarketCap': 201983640, 'Name': 'AAC Holdings Inc', 'High': 8.67, 'Open': 8.47, 'LastPrice': 8.52, 'Symbol': 'AAC', 'Change': -0.0500000000000007, 'MSDate': 42710.6680555556, 'Status': 'SUCCESS', 'ChangePercent': -0.583430571761969}
AADR
{'Volume': 0, 'ChangePercentYTD': 0, 'Timestamp': None, 'Low': 0, 'ChangeYTD': 0, 'MarketCap': 0, 'Name': 'AdvisorShares Dorsey Wright ADR ETF', 'High': 0, 'Open': 0, 'LastPrice': 0, 'Symbol': 'AADR', 'Change': 0, 'MSDate': 0, 'Status': 'Failure|APP_SPECIFIC_ERROR', 'ChangePercent': 0}
AAL
{'Volume': 5327768, 'ChangePercentYTD': 9.63400236127509, 'Timestamp': 'Tue Dec 6 00:00:00 UTC-05:00 2016', 'Low': 45.92, 'ChangeYTD': 42.35, 'MarketCap': 24056543750, 'Name': 'American Airlines Group Inc', 'High': 46.55, 'Open': 46.16, 'LastPrice': 46.43, 'Symbol': 'AAL', 'Change': 0.710000000000001, 'MSDate': 42710, 'Status': 'SUCCESS', 'ChangePercent': 1.55293088363955}
AAMC
{'Volume': 0, 'ChangePercentYTD': 0, 'Timestamp': None, 'Low': 0, 'ChangeYTD': 0, 'MarketCap': 0, 'Name': 'Altisource Asset Management Corp', 'High': 0, 'Open': 0, 'LastPrice': 0, 'Symbol': 'AAMC', 'Change': 0, 'MSDate': 0, 'Status': 'Failure|APP_SPECIFIC_ERROR', 'ChangePercent': 0}
AAME
AAN
{'Volume': 679548, 'ChangePercentYTD': 35.1496203662349, 'Timestamp': 'Tue Dec 6 16:02:00 UTC-05:00 2016', 'Low': 29.49, 'ChangeYTD': 22.39, 'MarketCap': 2161108680, 'Name': "Aaron's Inc", 'High': 30.29, 'Open': 29.71, 'LastPrice': 30.26, 'Symbol': 'AAN', 'Change': 0.400000000000002, 'MSDate': 42710.6680555556, 'Status': 'SUCCESS', 'ChangePercent': 1.3395847287341}
AAOI
AAON
{'Volume': 166238, 'ChangePercentYTD': 41.0422049956934, 'Timestamp': 'Tue Dec 6 00:00:00 UTC-05:00 2016', 'Low': 32.4, 'ChangeYTD': 23.22, 'MarketCap': 1727726250, 'Name': 'AAON Inc', 'High': 32.95, 'Open': 32.8, 'LastPrice': 32.75, 'Symbol': 'AAON', 'Change': -0.100000000000001, 'MSDate': 42710, 'Status': 'SUCCESS', 'ChangePercent': -0.304414003044144}
AAP
{'Volume': 753400, 'ChangePercentYTD': 15.1484951166036, 'Timestamp': 'Tue Dec 6 16:02:00 UTC-05:00 2016', 'Low': 169.85, 'ChangeYTD': 150.51, 'MarketCap': 12764974740, 'Name': 'Advance Auto Parts Inc', 'High': 173.76, 'Open': 170.18, 'LastPrice': 173.31, 'Symbol': 'AAP', 'Change': 2.78, 'MSDate': 42710.6680555556, 'Status': 'SUCCESS', 'ChangePercent': 1.63021169295725}
AAPC
{'Volume': 0, 'ChangePercentYTD': 0, 'Timestamp': None, 'Low': 0, 'ChangeYTD': 0, 'MarketCap': 0, 'Name': 'Atlantic Alliance Partnership Corp', 'High': 0, 'Open': 0, 'LastPrice': 0, 'Symbol': 'AAPC', 'Change': 0, 'MSDate': 0, 'Status': 'Failure|APP_SPECIFIC_ERROR', 'ChangePercent': 0}
AAPL
{'Volume': 26075932, 'ChangePercentYTD': 4.45563366901007, 'Timestamp': 'Tue Dec 6 00:00:00 UTC-05:00 2016', 'Low': 109.19, 'ChangeYTD': 105.26, 'MarketCap': 586287814350, 'Name': 'Apple Inc', 'High': 110.36, 'Open': 109.5, 'LastPrice': 109.95, 'Symbol': 'AAPL', 'Change': 0.840000000000003, 'MSDate': 42710, 'Status': 'SUCCESS', 'ChangePercent': 0.769865273577127}
AAT
{'Volume': 207488, 'ChangePercentYTD': 4.69361147327248, 'Timestamp': 'Tue Dec 6 16:02:00 UTC-05:00 2016', 'Low': 39.56, 'ChangeYTD': 38.35, 'MarketCap': 1832486150, 'Name': 'American Assets Trust Inc', 'High': 40.17, 'Open': 39.75, 'LastPrice': 40.15, 'Symbol': 'AAT', 'Change': 0.0899999999999963, 'MSDate': 42710.6680555556, 'Status': 'SUCCESS', 'ChangePercent': 0.224663005491753}
AAU
{'Volume': 0, 'ChangePercentYTD': 0, 'Timestamp': None, 'Low': 0, 'ChangeYTD': 0, 'MarketCap': 0, 'Name': 'Almaden Minerals Ltd', 'High': 0, 'Open': 0, 'LastPrice': 0, 'Symbol': 'AAU', 'Change': 0, 'MSDate': 0, 'Status': 'Failure|APP_SPECIFIC_ERROR', 'ChangePercent': 0}
AAV
{'Volume': 263397, 'ChangePercentYTD': 44.6850393700787, 'Timestamp': 'Tue Dec 6 16:02:00 UTC-05:00 2016', 'Low': 7.275, 'ChangeYTD': 5.08, 'MarketCap': 1357148100, 'Name': 'Advantage Oil & Gas Ltd', 'High': 7.425, 'Open': 7.3, 'LastPrice': 7.35, 'Symbol': 'AAV', 'Change': 0, 'MSDate': 42710.6680555556, 'Status': 'SUCCESS', 'ChangePercent': 0}
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
KeyboardInterrupt                         Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-51-e80a20c1d1bd> in <module>()
      9             stprc.write(str(quotesym.json()))
     10 
---> 11     time.sleep(1)
     12         #elif ValueError:
     13         #    pass

KeyboardInterrupt: 
In [ ]:
#http://dev.markitondemand.com/MODApis/Api/v2/Quote/json?symbol=AAPL

eceret

In [25]:
import csv
import json
import getpass
import requests

ECE Ret

Parse csv file of New Zealand Early Childhood Services from Ministry of Education. Saves the files as a json file for each centre. The name is the ID of the centre.

https://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/data-services/directories/early-childhood-services

In [13]:
myusr = getpass.getuser()
In [14]:
#centlis = list()
In [15]:
#with open('/home/pi/Downloads/Directory-ECE-Current.csv', 'r') as ececur:
#    spamreader = csv.reader(ececur, delimiter=' ', quotechar='|')
#    for row in spamreader:
        #print (', '.join(row))
#        centlis.append(', '.join(row))
In [16]:
with open('/home/{}/Downloads/Directory-ECE-Current.csv'.format(myusr), 'r') as eceblah:
    reader = csv.DictReader(eceblah)
    
    for row in reader:
        #print(row['Name'])
        #diclis = dict({row['ID'] : row})
        #print(json.dumps(diclis))
        with open('/home/{}/ececentres/{}.json'.format(myusr, row['ID']), 'w') as ececen:
            ececen.write(json.dumps(row))
        
In [17]:
#centrelis
In [18]:
#lencen = len(centlis)
In [19]:
#lencen
In [20]:
#centen
In [21]:
#centen = centlis[10]
In [22]:
#cspli = centen.split(',')
In [23]:
#cspli[0:4]
In [24]:
#for lc in range(0, lencen):
#    print(centlis[lc])

creativecommonsjson

Creative Commons JSON

Returns json instead of xml from creative commons api.

flask api that returns cc license depending on what licence is requested.

add svg/eps along with current png.

88x31 image currently - add 88x15 images.

add public domain/cc zero to the api

In [2]:
import requests
import json
import xmltodict
from flask import Flask
from flask_restful import Resource, Api
In [113]:
app = Flask(__name__)
api = Api(app)

#CCBY CCBYNCSA CCBYSA CCBYND CCBYNCND CCBYND CCZERO CCPUBDOMAIN

class ccby(Resource):
    def get(self):
        ccdev = requests.get('http://api.creativecommons.org/rest/dev/license/standard/get?commercial=y&derivatives=y')
        xmpar = xmltodict.parse(ccdev.text)
        ccabtlic = xmpar['result']['rdf']['rdf:RDF']['License']['@rdf:about']
        cchtmtxt = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][1]['#text']
        ccimglic = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][0]['img']['@src']
        licdic = dict({'url' : ccabtlic, 'text' : cchtmtxt, 'img' :
        dict({'fullbutton' : dict({'png' : ccimglic, 'svg' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/88x31/svg/by.svg'}),
             'halfbutton' : dict({'png' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/80x15/png/by.png',
                                 'svg' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/80x15/svg/by.svg'})})}) 
        return licdic
    
class ccbync(Resource):
    def get(self):
        ccdev = requests.get('http://api.creativecommons.org/rest/dev/license/standard/get?commercial=n&derivatives=y')
        xmpar = xmltodict.parse(ccdev.text)
        ccabtlic = xmpar['result']['rdf']['rdf:RDF']['License']['@rdf:about']
        cchtmtxt = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][1]['#text']
        ccimglic = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][0]['img']['@src']
        licdic = dict({'url' : ccabtlic, 'text' : cchtmtxt, 'img' :
        dict({'fullbutton' : dict({'png' : ccimglic, 'svg' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/88x31/svg/by-nc.svg'}),
             'halfbutton' : dict({'png' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/80x15/png/by-nc.png',
                                 'svg' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/80x15/svg/by-nc.svg'})})}) 
        return licdic
    
class ccbyncsa(Resource):
    def get(self):
        ccdev = requests.get('http://api.creativecommons.org/rest/dev/details?license-uri=http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/')
        xmpar = xmltodict.parse(ccdev.text)
        ccabtlic = xmpar['result']['rdf']['rdf:RDF']['License']['@rdf:about']
        cchtmtxt = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][1]['#text']
        ccimglic = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][0]['img']['@src']
        licdic = dict({'url' : ccabtlic, 'text' : cchtmtxt, 'img' :
        dict({'fullbutton' : dict({'png' : ccimglic, 'svg' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/88x31/svg/by-nc-sa.svg'}),
             'halfbutton' : dict({'png' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/80x15/png/by-nc-sa.png',
                                 'svg' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/80x15/svg/by-nc-sa.svg'})})}) 
        return licdic

class ccbysa(Resource):
    def get(self):
        ccdev = requests.get('http://api.creativecommons.org/rest/dev/details?license-uri=http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/')
        xmpar = xmltodict.parse(ccdev.text)
        ccabtlic = xmpar['result']['rdf']['rdf:RDF']['License']['@rdf:about']
        cchtmtxt = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][1]['#text']
        ccimglic = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][0]['img']['@src']
        licdic = dict({'url' : ccabtlic, 'text' : cchtmtxt, 'img' : dict({'png' : ccimglic, 'svg' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/88x31/svg/by-sa.svg'})})
        return licdic
        
class ccbync(Resource):
    def get(self):
        ccdev = requests.get('http://api.creativecommons.org/rest/dev/license/standard/get?commercial=n&derivatives=y')
        xmpar = xmltodict.parse(ccdev.text)
        ccabtlic = xmpar['result']['rdf']['rdf:RDF']['License']['@rdf:about']
        cchtmtxt = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][1]['#text']
        ccimglic = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][0]['img']['@src']
        licdic = dict({'url' : ccabtlic, 'text' : cchtmtxt, 'img' :
        dict({'fullbutton' : dict({'png' : ccimglic, 'svg' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/88x31/svg/by-nc.svg'}),
             'halfbutton' : dict({'png' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/80x15/png/by-nc.png',
                                 'svg' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/80x15/svg/by-nc.svg'})})}) 
        return(licdic)

    
class ccbyncnd(Resource):
    def get(self):
        ccdev = requests.get('http://api.creativecommons.org/rest/dev/license/standard/get?commercial=n&derivatives=n')
        xmpar = xmltodict.parse(ccdev.text)
        ccabtlic = xmpar['result']['rdf']['rdf:RDF']['License']['@rdf:about']
        cchtmtxt = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][1]['#text']
        ccimglic = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][0]['img']['@src']
        licdic = dict({'url' : ccabtlic, 'text' : cchtmtxt, 'img' :
        dict({'fullbutton' : dict({'png' : ccimglic, 'svg' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/88x31/svg/by-nc-nd.svg'}),
             'halfbutton' : dict({'png' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/80x15/png/by-nc-nd.png',
                                 'svg' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/80x15/svg/by-nc-nd.svg'})})}) 
        return licdic
    
class ccbynd(Resource):
    def get(self):
        ccdev = requests.get('http://api.creativecommons.org/rest/dev/license/standard/get?commercial=y&derivatives=n')
        xmpar = xmltodict.parse(ccdev.text)
        ccabtlic = xmpar['result']['rdf']['rdf:RDF']['License']['@rdf:about']
        cchtmtxt = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][1]['#text']
        ccimglic = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][0]['img']['@src']
        licdic = dict({'url' : ccabtlic, 'text' : cchtmtxt, 'img' :
        dict({'fullbutton' : dict({'png' : ccimglic, 'svg' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/88x31/svg/nd.svg'}),
             'halfbutton' : dict({'png' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/80x15/png/by-nd.png',
                                 'svg' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/80x15/svg/by-nd.svg'})})}) 
        return licdic
    
class cczero(Resource):
    def get(self):
        ccdev = requests.get('http://api.creativecommons.org/rest/dev/details?license-uri=http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/')
        xmpar = xmltodict.parse(ccdev.text)
        ccabtlic = xmpar['result']['rdf']['rdf:RDF']['License']['@rdf:about']
        cchtmtxt = xmpar['result']['license-name']
        ccimglic = xmpar['result']['html']['p']['a']['img']['@src']
        licdic = dict({'url' : ccabtlic, 'text' : cchtmtxt, 'img' :
        dict({'fullbutton' : dict({'png' : ccimglic, 'svg' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/88x31/svg/cc-zero.svg'}),
             'halfbutton' : dict({'png' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/80x15/png/cc-zero.png',
                                 'svg' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/80x15/svg/cc-zero.svg'})})}) 
        return licdic

class ccpubdom(Resource):
    def get(self):
        ccdev = requests.get('http://api.creativecommons.org/rest/dev/details?license-uri=http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/')
        xmpar = xmltodict.parse(ccdev.text)
        ccabtlic = xmpar['result']['rdf']['rdf:RDF']['License']['@rdf:about']
        cchtmtxt = xmpar['result']['license-name']
        ccimglic = xmpar['result']['html']['p']['a']['img']['@src']
        licdic = dict({'url' : ccabtlic, 'text' : cchtmtxt, 'img' :
        dict({'fullbutton' : dict({'png' : ccimglic, 'svg' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/88x31/svg/cc-publicdomain.svg'}),
             'halfbutton' : dict({'png' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/80x15/png/cc-publicdomain.png',
                                 'svg' : 'http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/80x15/svg/cc-publicdomain.svg'})})}) 
        
        return licdic
    
api.add_resource(ccby, '/by')

api.add_resource(ccbync, '/bync')

api.add_resource(ccbynd, '/bynd')

api.add_resource(ccbyncnd, '/byncnd')

api.add_resource(ccbysa, '/bysa')
                 
api.add_resource(ccbyncsa, '/byncsa')

api.add_resource(cczero, '/zero')

api.add_resource(ccpubdom, '/publicdomain')

if __name__ == '__main__':
    app.run(host = '0.0.0.0')
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
OSError                                   Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-113-222dde2a7eb2> in <module>()
     12 
     13 if __name__ == '__main__':
---> 14     app.run(host = '0.0.0.0')

/usr/local/lib/python3.4/dist-packages/flask/app.py in run(self, host, port, debug, **options)
    841         options.setdefault('passthrough_errors', True)
    842         try:
--> 843             run_simple(host, port, self, **options)
    844         finally:
    845             # reset the first request information if the development server

/usr/local/lib/python3.4/dist-packages/werkzeug/serving.py in run_simple(hostname, port, application, use_reloader, use_debugger, use_evalex, extra_files, reloader_interval, reloader_type, threaded, processes, request_handler, static_files, passthrough_errors, ssl_context)
    692                           reloader_type)
    693     else:
--> 694         inner()
    695 
    696 

/usr/local/lib/python3.4/dist-packages/werkzeug/serving.py in inner()
    654                           processes, request_handler,
    655                           passthrough_errors, ssl_context,
--> 656                           fd=fd)
    657         if fd is None:
    658             log_startup(srv.socket)

/usr/local/lib/python3.4/dist-packages/werkzeug/serving.py in make_server(host, port, app, threaded, processes, request_handler, passthrough_errors, ssl_context, fd)
    548     else:
    549         return BaseWSGIServer(host, port, app, request_handler,
--> 550                               passthrough_errors, ssl_context, fd=fd)
    551 
    552 

/usr/local/lib/python3.4/dist-packages/werkzeug/serving.py in __init__(self, host, port, app, handler, passthrough_errors, ssl_context, fd)
    462                                       socket.SOCK_STREAM)
    463             port = 0
--> 464         HTTPServer.__init__(self, (host, int(port)), handler)
    465         self.app = app
    466         self.passthrough_errors = passthrough_errors

/usr/lib/python3.4/socketserver.py in __init__(self, server_address, RequestHandlerClass, bind_and_activate)
    427                                     self.socket_type)
    428         if bind_and_activate:
--> 429             self.server_bind()
    430             self.server_activate()
    431 

/usr/lib/python3.4/http/server.py in server_bind(self)
    131     def server_bind(self):
    132         """Override server_bind to store the server name."""
--> 133         socketserver.TCPServer.server_bind(self)
    134         host, port = self.socket.getsockname()[:2]
    135         self.server_name = socket.getfqdn(host)

/usr/lib/python3.4/socketserver.py in server_bind(self)
    438         if self.allow_reuse_address:
    439             self.socket.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_REUSEADDR, 1)
--> 440         self.socket.bind(self.server_address)
    441         self.server_address = self.socket.getsockname()
    442 

OSError: [Errno 98] Address already in use
In [3]:
#licstand = requests.get('http://api.creativecommons.org/rest/1.5/license/standard')
In [7]:
#dictlic = xmltodict.parse(licstand.text)
In [21]:
#lenfield = len(dictlic['licenseclass']['field'])
In [36]:
#for lenf in range(0, lenfield):
#    print(dictlic['licenseclass']['field'][lenf]['label'])
    
    #print(dictlic['licenseclass']['field'][lenf]['@id'])
    
    #print(dictlic['licenseclass']['field'][lenf])
    
    #print(dictlic['licenseclass']['field'][lenf]['description'])
OrderedDict([('@xml:lang', 'en'), ('#text', 'Allow commercial uses of your work?')])
OrderedDict([('@xml:lang', 'en'), ('#text', 'Allow modifications of your work?')])
OrderedDict([('@xml:lang', 'en'), ('#text', 'Jurisdiction of your license')])
In [ ]:
#ShareAlike
In [134]:
#ccdev = requests.get('http://api.creativecommons.org/rest/dev/license/standard/get?commercial=n&derivatives=y')
In [135]:
#xmpar = xmltodict.parse(ccdev.text)
In [136]:
#xmpar['result']['rdf']['rdf:RDF']
Out[136]:
OrderedDict([('@xmlns', 'http://creativecommons.org/ns#'),
             ('@xmlns:rdf', 'http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#'),
             ('Work',
              OrderedDict([('@xmlns:dc', 'http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/'),
                           ('@rdf:about', ''),
                           ('license',
                            OrderedDict([('@rdf:resource',
                                          'http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/')]))])),
             ('License',
              OrderedDict([('@rdf:about',
                            'http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/'),
                           ('permits',
                            [OrderedDict([('@rdf:resource',
                                           'http://creativecommons.org/ns#DerivativeWorks')]),
                             OrderedDict([('@rdf:resource',
                                           'http://creativecommons.org/ns#Distribution')]),
                             OrderedDict([('@rdf:resource',
                                           'http://creativecommons.org/ns#Reproduction')])]),
                           ('requires',
                            [OrderedDict([('@rdf:resource',
                                           'http://creativecommons.org/ns#Attribution')]),
                             OrderedDict([('@rdf:resource',
                                           'http://creativecommons.org/ns#Notice')])])]))])
In [128]:
#xmpar['result']['rdf']['rdf:RDF']['@xmlns']
Out[128]:
'http://creativecommons.org/ns#'
In [129]:
#xmpar['result']['rdf']['rdf:RDF']['Work']
Out[129]:
OrderedDict([('@xmlns:dc', 'http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/'),
             ('@rdf:about', ''),
             ('license',
              OrderedDict([('@rdf:resource',
                            'http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/')]))])
In [130]:
#xmpar['result']['rdf']['rdf:RDF']['License']
Out[130]:
OrderedDict([('@rdf:about', 'http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/'),
             ('permits',
              [OrderedDict([('@rdf:resource',
                             'http://creativecommons.org/ns#DerivativeWorks')]),
               OrderedDict([('@rdf:resource',
                             'http://creativecommons.org/ns#Distribution')]),
               OrderedDict([('@rdf:resource',
                             'http://creativecommons.org/ns#Reproduction')])]),
             ('requires',
              [OrderedDict([('@rdf:resource',
                             'http://creativecommons.org/ns#Attribution')]),
               OrderedDict([('@rdf:resource',
                             'http://creativecommons.org/ns#Notice')])])])
In [120]:
#ccabtlic = xmpar['result']['rdf']['rdf:RDF']['License']['@rdf:about']
In [121]:
#ccabtlic
Out[121]:
'http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/'
In [92]:
#for perm in xmpar['result']['rdf']['rdf:RDF']['License']['permits']:
#    print(perm['@rdf:resource'])
http://creativecommons.org/ns#DerivativeWorks
http://creativecommons.org/ns#Distribution
http://creativecommons.org/ns#Reproduction
In [93]:
#xmpar['result']['html']['#text']
Out[93]:
'This work is licensed under a .'
In [107]:
#cchtmtxt = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][1]['#text']
In [108]:
#ccimglic = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][0]['img']['@src']
In [109]:
#http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/presskit/buttons/88x31/svg/by.svg
In [111]:
#licdic = dict({'licurl' : ccabtlic, 'lictext' : cchtmtxt, 'ccimg' : ccimglic})
In [112]:
#licdic
Out[112]:
{'ccimg': 'http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by/4.0/88x31.png',
 'lictext': 'Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License',
 'licurl': 'http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/'}
In [138]:
#ccdev = requests.get('http://api.creativecommons.org/rest/dev/details?license-uri=http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/')
In [141]:
#reqccsa.text

#xmpar = xmltodict.parse(reqccsa.text)
#ccabtlic = xmpar['result']['rdf']['rdf:RDF']['License']['@rdf:about']
#cchtmtxt = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][1]['#text']
#ccimglic = xmpar['result']['html']['a'][0]['img']['@src']
#licdic = dict({'licurl' : ccabtlic, 'lictext' : cchtmtxt, 'ccimg' : ccimglic})
In [142]:
#licdic
Out[142]:
{'ccimg': 'http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-sa/4.0/88x31.png',
 'lictext': 'Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License',
 'licurl': 'http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/'}
In [ ]:
#http://api.creativecommons.org/rest/dev/simple/chooser
In [ ]:
#http://api.creativecommons.org/rest/dev/details?license-uri=creativecommons.org
    
#http://api.creativecommons.org/rest/dev/details?license-uri=http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

trumpquotegif

trump quote gif

mashup of trump trump quotes and gifs

Hillary Clinton Email Archive API. Merge with Trump Quotes, giphy and natural language toolkit.

In [ ]:
 
In [2]:
import giphypop
import random
import requests
import json
import getpass
import arrow
import nltk
In [3]:
#nltk.download()
In [4]:
from nltk.book import *
*** Introductory Examples for the NLTK Book ***
Loading text1, ..., text9 and sent1, ..., sent9
Type the name of the text or sentence to view it.
Type: 'texts()' or 'sents()' to list the materials.
text1: Moby Dick by Herman Melville 1851
text2: Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen 1811
text3: The Book of Genesis
text4: Inaugural Address Corpus
text5: Chat Corpus
text6: Monty Python and the Holy Grail
text7: Wall Street Journal
text8: Personals Corpus
text9: The Man Who Was Thursday by G . K . Chesterton 1908
In [7]:
text2.concordance('love')
Displaying 25 of 77 matches:
priety of going , and her own tender love for all her three children determine
es ." " I believe you are right , my love ; it will be better that there shoul
 . It implies everything amiable . I love him already ." " I think you will li
sentiment of approbation inferior to love ." " You may esteem him ." " I have 
n what it was to separate esteem and love ." Mrs . Dashwood now took pains to 
oner did she perceive any symptom of love in his behaviour to Elinor , than sh
 how shall we do without her ?" " My love , it will be scarcely a separation .
ise . Edward is very amiable , and I love him tenderly . But yet -- he is not 
ll never see a man whom I can really love . I require so much ! He must have a
ry possible charm ." " Remember , my love , that you are not seventeen . It is
f I do not now . When you tell me to love him as a brother , I shall no more s
hat Colonel Brandon was very much in love with Marianne Dashwood . She rather 
e were ever animated enough to be in love , must have long outlived every sens
hirty - five anything near enough to love , to make him a desirable companion 
roach would have been spared ." " My love ," said her mother , " you must not 
pect that the misery of disappointed love had already been known to him . This
 most melancholy order of disastrous love . CHAPTER 12 As Elinor and Marianne 
hen she considered what Marianne ' s love for him was , a quarrel seemed almos
ctory way ;-- but you , Elinor , who love to doubt where you can -- it will no
 man whom we have all such reason to love , and no reason in the world to thin
ded as he must be of your sister ' s love , should leave her , and leave her p
cannot think that . He must and does love her I am sure ." " But with a strang
 I believe not ," cried Elinor . " I love Willoughby , sincerely love him ; an
or . " I love Willoughby , sincerely love him ; and suspicion of his integrity
deed a man could not very well be in love with either of her daughters , witho
In [8]:
#ransam = random.sample(theful, 10)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
NameError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-8-82b8afc1dad2> in <module>()
----> 1 ransam = random.sample(theful, 10)

NameError: name 'theful' is not defined
In [ ]:
#ransam
In [41]:
#len(brown.words())
Out[41]:
1161192
In [8]:
ranshuf[50]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
NameError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-8-12983a53247d> in <module>()
----> 1 ranshuf[50]

NameError: name 'ranshuf' is not defined
In [9]:
random.choice(brown.words())
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
NameError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-9-be21d6df7981> in <module>()
----> 1 random.choice(brown.words())

NameError: name 'brown' is not defined
In [10]:
from nltk.corpus import brown
In [11]:
for bro in brown.words():
    print(bro)
The
Fulton
County
Grand
Jury
said
Friday
an
investigation
of
Atlanta's
recent
primary
election
produced
``
no
evidence
''
that
any
irregularities
took
place
.
The
jury
further
said
in
term-end
presentments
that
the
City
Executive
Committee
,
which
had
over-all
charge
of
the
election
,
``
deserves
the
praise
and
thanks
of
the
City
of
Atlanta
''
for
the
manner
in
which
the
election
was
conducted
.
The
September-October
term
jury
had
been
charged
by
Fulton
Superior
Court
Judge
Durwood
Pye
to
investigate
reports
of
possible
``
irregularities
''
in
the
hard-fought
primary
which
was
won
by
Mayor-nominate
Ivan
Allen
Jr.
.
``
Only
a
relative
handful
of
such
reports
was
received
''
,
the
jury
said
,
``
considering
the
widespread
interest
in
the
election
,
the
number
of
voters
and
the
size
of
this
city
''
.
The
jury
said
it
did
find
that
many
of
Georgia's
registration
and
election
laws
``
are
outmoded
or
inadequate
and
often
ambiguous
''
.
It
recommended
that
Fulton
legislators
act
``
to
have
these
laws
studied
and
revised
to
the
end
of
modernizing
and
improving
them
''
.
The
grand
jury
commented
on
a
number
of
other
topics
,
among
them
the
Atlanta
and
Fulton
County
purchasing
departments
which
it
said
``
are
well
operated
and
follow
generally
accepted
practices
which
inure
to
the
best
interest
of
both
governments
''
.
Merger
proposed
However
,
the
jury
said
it
believes
``
these
two
offices
should
be
combined
to
achieve
greater
efficiency
and
reduce
the
cost
of
administration
''
.
The
City
Purchasing
Department
,
the
jury
said
,
``
is
lacking
in
experienced
clerical
personnel
as
a
result
of
city
personnel
policies
''
.
It
urged
that
the
city
``
take
steps
to
remedy
''
this
problem
.
Implementation
of
Georgia's
automobile
title
law
was
also
recommended
by
the
outgoing
jury
.
It
urged
that
the
next
Legislature
``
provide
enabling
funds
and
re-set
the
effective
date
so
that
an
orderly
implementation
of
the
law
may
be
effected
''
.
The
grand
jury
took
a
swipe
at
the
State
Welfare
Department's
handling
of
federal
funds
granted
for
child
welfare
services
in
foster
homes
.
``
This
is
one
of
the
major
items
in
the
Fulton
County
general
assistance
program
''
,
the
jury
said
,
but
the
State
Welfare
Department
``
has
seen
fit
to
distribute
these
funds
through
the
welfare
departments
of
all
the
counties
in
the
state
with
the
exception
of
Fulton
County
,
which
receives
none
of
this
money
.
The
jurors
said
they
realize
``
a
proportionate
distribution
of
these
funds
might
disable
this
program
in
our
less
populous
counties
''
.
Nevertheless
,
``
we
feel
that
in
the
future
Fulton
County
should
receive
some
portion
of
these
available
funds
''
,
the
jurors
said
.
``
Failure
to
do
this
will
continue
to
place
a
disproportionate
burden
''
on
Fulton
taxpayers
.
The
jury
also
commented
on
the
Fulton
ordinary's
court
which
has
been
under
fire
for
its
practices
in
the
appointment
of
appraisers
,
guardians
and
administrators
and
the
awarding
of
fees
and
compensation
.
Wards
protected
The
jury
said
it
found
the
court
``
has
incorporated
into
its
operating
procedures
the
recommendations
''
of
two
previous
grand
juries
,
the
Atlanta
Bar
Association
and
an
interim
citizens
committee
.
``
These
actions
should
serve
to
protect
in
fact
and
in
effect
the
court's
wards
from
undue
costs
and
its
appointed
and
elected
servants
from
unmeritorious
criticisms
''
,
the
jury
said
.
Regarding
Atlanta's
new
multi-million-dollar
airport
,
the
jury
recommended
``
that
when
the
new
management
takes
charge
Jan.
1
the
airport
be
operated
in
a
manner
that
will
eliminate
political
influences
''
.
The
jury
did
not
elaborate
,
but
it
added
that
``
there
should
be
periodic
surveillance
of
the
pricing
practices
of
the
concessionaires
for
the
purpose
of
keeping
the
prices
reasonable
''
.
Ask
jail
deputies
On
other
matters
,
the
jury
recommended
that
:
(
1
)
Four
additional
deputies
be
employed
at
the
Fulton
County
Jail
and
``
a
doctor
,
medical
intern
or
extern
be
employed
for
night
and
weekend
duty
at
the
jail
''
.
(
2
)
Fulton
legislators
``
work
with
city
officials
to
pass
enabling
legislation
that
will
permit
the
establishment
of
a
fair
and
equitable
''
pension
plan
for
city
employes
.
The
jury
praised
the
administration
and
operation
of
the
Atlanta
Police
Department
,
the
Fulton
Tax
Commissioner's
Office
,
the
Bellwood
and
Alpharetta
prison
farms
,
Grady
Hospital
and
the
Fulton
Health
Department
.
Mayor
William
B.
Hartsfield
filed
suit
for
divorce
from
his
wife
,
Pearl
Williams
Hartsfield
,
in
Fulton
Superior
Court
Friday
.
His
petition
charged
mental
cruelty
.
The
couple
was
married
Aug.
2
,
1913
.
They
have
a
son
,
William
Berry
Jr.
,
and
a
daughter
,
Mrs.
J.
M.
Cheshire
of
Griffin
.
Attorneys
for
the
mayor
said
that
an
amicable
property
settlement
has
been
agreed
upon
.
The
petition
listed
the
mayor's
occupation
as
``
attorney
''
and
his
age
as
71
.
It
listed
his
wife's
age
as
74
and
place
of
birth
as
Opelika
,
Ala.
.
The
petition
said
that
the
couple
has
not
lived
together
as
man
and
wife
for
more
than
a
year
.
The
Hartsfield
home
is
at
637
E.
Pelham
Rd.
Aj
.
Henry
L.
Bowden
was
listed
on
the
petition
as
the
mayor's
attorney
.
Hartsfield
has
been
mayor
of
Atlanta
,
with
exception
of
one
brief
interlude
,
since
1937
.
His
political
career
goes
back
to
his
election
to
city
council
in
1923
.
The
mayor's
present
term
of
office
expires
Jan.
1
.
He
will
be
succeeded
by
Ivan
Allen
Jr.
,
who
became
a
candidate
in
the
Sept.
13
primary
after
Mayor
Hartsfield
announced
that
he
would
not
run
for
reelection
.
Georgia
Republicans
are
getting
strong
encouragement
to
enter
a
candidate
in
the
1962
governor's
race
,
a
top
official
said
Wednesday
.
Robert
Snodgrass
,
state
GOP
chairman
,
said
a
meeting
held
Tuesday
night
in
Blue
Ridge
brought
enthusiastic
responses
from
the
audience
.
State
Party
Chairman
James
W.
Dorsey
added
that
enthusiasm
was
picking
up
for
a
state
rally
to
be
held
Sept.
8
in
Savannah
at
which
newly
elected
Texas
Sen.
John
Tower
will
be
the
featured
speaker
.
In
the
Blue
Ridge
meeting
,
the
audience
was
warned
that
entering
a
candidate
for
governor
would
force
it
to
take
petitions
out
into
voting
precincts
to
obtain
the
signatures
of
registered
voters
.
Despite
the
warning
,
there
was
a
unanimous
vote
to
enter
a
candidate
,
according
to
Republicans
who
attended
.
When
the
crowd
was
asked
whether
it
wanted
to
wait
one
more
term
to
make
the
race
,
it
voted
no
--
and
there
were
no
dissents
.
The
largest
hurdle
the
Republicans
would
have
to
face
is
a
state
law
which
says
that
before
making
a
first
race
,
one
of
two
alternative
courses
must
be
taken
:
1
Five
per
cent
of
the
voters
in
each
county
must
sign
petitions
requesting
that
the
Republicans
be
allowed
to
place
names
of
candidates
on
the
general
election
ballot
,
or
2
The
Republicans
must
hold
a
primary
under
the
county
unit
system
--
a
system
which
the
party
opposes
in
its
platform
.
Sam
Caldwell
,
State
Highway
Department
public
relations
director
,
resigned
Tuesday
to
work
for
Lt.
Gov.
Garland
Byrd's
campaign
.
Caldwell's
resignation
had
been
expected
for
some
time
.
He
will
be
succeeded
by
Rob
Ledford
of
Gainesville
,
who
has
been
an
assistant
more
than
three
years
.
When
the
gubernatorial
campaign
starts
,
Caldwell
is
expected
to
become
a
campaign
coordinator
for
Byrd
.
The
Georgia
Legislature
will
wind
up
its
1961
session
Monday
and
head
for
home
--
where
some
of
the
highway
bond
money
it
approved
will
follow
shortly
.
Before
adjournment
Monday
afternoon
,
the
Senate
is
expected
to
approve
a
study
of
the
number
of
legislators
allotted
to
rural
and
urban
areas
to
determine
what
adjustments
should
be
made
.
Gov.
Vandiver
is
expected
to
make
the
traditional
visit
to
both
chambers
as
they
work
toward
adjournment
.
Vandiver
likely
will
mention
the
$100
million
highway
bond
issue
approved
earlier
in
the
session
as
his
first
priority
item
.
Construction
bonds
Meanwhile
,
it
was
learned
the
State
Highway
Department
is
very
near
being
ready
to
issue
the
first
$30
million
worth
of
highway
reconstruction
bonds
.
The
bond
issue
will
go
to
the
state
courts
for
a
friendly
test
suit
to
test
the
validity
of
the
act
,
and
then
the
sales
will
begin
and
contracts
let
for
repair
work
on
some
of
Georgia's
most
heavily
traveled
highways
.
A
Highway
Department
source
said
there
also
is
a
plan
there
to
issue
some
$3
million
to
$4
million
worth
of
Rural
Roads
Authority
bonds
for
rural
road
construction
work
.
A
revolving
fund
The
department
apparently
intends
to
make
the
Rural
Roads
Authority
a
revolving
fund
under
which
new
bonds
would
be
issued
every
time
a
portion
of
the
old
ones
are
paid
off
by
tax
authorities
.
Vandiver
opened
his
race
for
governor
in
1958
with
a
battle
in
the
Legislature
against
the
issuance
of
$50
million
worth
of
additional
rural
roads
bonds
proposed
by
then
Gov.
Marvin
Griffin
.
The
Highway
Department
source
told
The
Constitution
,
however
,
that
Vandiver
has
not
been
consulted
yet
about
the
plans
to
issue
the
new
rural
roads
bonds
.
Schley
County
Rep.
B.
D.
Pelham
will
offer
a
resolution
Monday
in
the
House
to
rescind
the
body's
action
of
Friday
in
voting
itself
a
$10
per
day
increase
in
expense
allowances
.
Pelham
said
Sunday
night
there
was
research
being
done
on
whether
the
``
quickie
''
vote
on
the
increase
can
be
repealed
outright
or
whether
notice
would
have
to
first
be
given
that
reconsideration
of
the
action
would
be
sought
.
While
emphasizing
that
technical
details
were
not
fully
worked
out
,
Pelham
said
his
resolution
would
seek
to
set
aside
the
privilege
resolution
which
the
House
voted
through
87-31
.
A
similar
resolution
passed
in
the
Senate
by
a
vote
of
29-5
.
As
of
Sunday
night
,
there
was
no
word
of
a
resolution
being
offered
there
to
rescind
the
action
.
Pelham
pointed
out
that
Georgia
voters
last
November
rejected
a
constitutional
amendment
to
allow
legislators
to
vote
on
pay
raises
for
future
Legislature
sessions
.
A
veteran
Jackson
County
legislator
will
ask
the
Georgia
House
Monday
to
back
federal
aid
to
education
,
something
it
has
consistently
opposed
in
the
past
.
Rep.
Mac
Barber
of
Commerce
is
asking
the
House
in
a
privilege
resolution
to
``
endorse
increased
federal
support
for
public
education
,
provided
that
such
funds
be
received
and
expended
''
as
state
funds
.
Barber
,
who
is
in
his
13th
year
as
a
legislator
,
said
there
``
are
some
members
of
our
congressional
delegation
in
Washington
who
would
like
to
see
it
(
the
resolution
)
passed
''
.
But
he
added
that
none
of
Georgia's
congressmen
specifically
asked
him
to
offer
the
resolution
.
The
resolution
,
which
Barber
tossed
into
the
House
hopper
Friday
,
will
be
formally
read
Monday
.
It
says
that
``
in
the
event
Congress
does
provide
this
increase
in
federal
funds
''
,
the
State
Board
of
Education
should
be
directed
to
``
give
priority
''
to
teacher
pay
raises
.
Colquitt
--
After
a
long
,
hot
controversy
,
Miller
County
has
a
new
school
superintendent
,
elected
,
as
a
policeman
put
it
,
in
the
``
coolest
election
I
ever
saw
in
this
county
''
.
The
new
school
superintendent
is
Harry
Davis
,
a
veteran
agriculture
teacher
,
who
defeated
Felix
Bush
,
a
school
principal
and
chairman
of
the
Miller
County
Democratic
Executive
Committee
.
Davis
received
1,119
votes
in
Saturday's
election
,
and
Bush
got
402
.
Ordinary
Carey
Williams
,
armed
with
a
pistol
,
stood
by
at
the
polls
to
insure
order
.
``
This
was
the
coolest
,
calmest
election
I
ever
saw
''
,
Colquitt
Policeman
Tom
Williams
said
.
``
Being
at
the
polls
was
just
like
being
at
church
.
I
didn't
smell
a
drop
of
liquor
,
and
we
didn't
have
a
bit
of
trouble
''
.
The
campaign
leading
to
the
election
was
not
so
quiet
,
however
.
It
was
marked
by
controversy
,
anonymous
midnight
phone
calls
and
veiled
threats
of
violence
.
The
former
county
school
superintendent
,
George
P.
Callan
,
shot
himself
to
death
March
18
,
four
days
after
he
resigned
his
post
in
a
dispute
with
the
county
school
board
.
During
the
election
campaign
,
both
candidates
,
Davis
and
Bush
,
reportedly
received
anonymous
telephone
calls
.
Ordinary
Williams
said
he
,
too
,
was
subjected
to
anonymous
calls
soon
after
he
scheduled
the
election
.
Many
local
citizens
feared
that
there
would
be
irregularities
at
the
polls
,
and
Williams
got
himself
a
permit
to
carry
a
gun
and
promised
an
orderly
election
.
Sheriff
Felix
Tabb
said
the
ordinary
apparently
made
good
his
promise
.
``
Everything
went
real
smooth
''
,
the
sheriff
said
.
``
There
wasn't
a
bit
of
trouble
''
.
Austin
,
Texas
--
Committee
approval
of
Gov.
Price
Daniel's
``
abandoned
property
''
act
seemed
certain
Thursday
despite
the
adamant
protests
of
Texas
bankers
.
Daniel
personally
led
the
fight
for
the
measure
,
which
he
had
watered
down
considerably
since
its
rejection
by
two
previous
Legislatures
,
in
a
public
hearing
before
the
House
Committee
on
Revenue
and
Taxation
.
Under
committee
rules
,
it
went
automatically
to
a
subcommittee
for
one
week
.
But
questions
with
which
committee
members
taunted
bankers
appearing
as
witnesses
left
little
doubt
that
they
will
recommend
passage
of
it
.
Daniel
termed
``
extremely
conservative
''
his
estimate
that
it
would
produce
17
million
dollars
to
help
erase
an
anticipated
deficit
of
63
million
dollars
at
the
end
of
the
current
fiscal
year
next
Aug.
31
.
He
told
the
committee
the
measure
would
merely
provide
means
of
enforcing
the
escheat
law
which
has
been
on
the
books
``
since
Texas
was
a
republic
''
.
It
permits
the
state
to
take
over
bank
accounts
,
stocks
and
other
personal
property
of
persons
missing
for
seven
years
or
more
.
The
bill
,
which
Daniel
said
he
drafted
personally
,
would
force
banks
,
insurance
firms
,
pipeline
companies
and
other
corporations
to
report
such
property
to
the
state
treasurer
.
The
escheat
law
cannot
be
enforced
now
because
it
is
almost
impossible
to
locate
such
property
,
Daniel
declared
.
Dewey
Lawrence
,
a
Tyler
lawyer
representing
the
Texas
Bankers
Association
,
sounded
the
opposition
keynote
when
he
said
it
would
force
banks
to
violate
their
contractual
obligations
with
depositors
and
undermine
the
confidence
of
bank
customers
.
``
If
you
destroy
confidence
in
banks
,
you
do
something
to
the
economy
''
,
he
said
.
``
You
take
out
of
circulation
many
millions
of
dollars
''
.
Rep.
Charles
E.
Hughes
of
Sherman
,
sponsor
of
the
bill
,
said
a
failure
to
enact
it
would
amount
``
to
making
a
gift
out
of
the
taxpayers'
pockets
to
banks
,
insurance
and
pipeline
companies
''
.
His
contention
was
denied
by
several
bankers
,
including
Scott
Hudson
of
Sherman
,
Gaynor
B.
Jones
of
Houston
,
J.
B.
Brady
of
Harlingen
and
Howard
Cox
of
Austin
.
Cox
argued
that
the
bill
is
``
probably
unconstitutional
''
since
,
he
said
,
it
would
impair
contracts
.
He
also
complained
that
not
enough
notice
was
given
on
the
hearing
,
since
the
bill
was
introduced
only
last
Monday
.
Austin
,
Texas
--
Senators
unanimously
approved
Thursday
the
bill
of
Sen.
George
Parkhouse
of
Dallas
authorizing
establishment
of
day
schools
for
the
deaf
in
Dallas
and
the
four
other
largest
counties
.
The
bill
is
designed
to
provide
special
schooling
for
more
deaf
students
in
the
scholastic
age
at
a
reduced
cost
to
the
state
.
There
was
no
debate
as
the
Senate
passed
the
bill
on
to
the
House
.
It
would
authorize
the
Texas
Education
Agency
to
establish
county-wide
day
schools
for
the
deaf
in
counties
of
300,000
or
more
population
,
require
deaf
children
between
6
and
13
years
of
age
to
attend
the
day
schools
,
permitting
older
ones
to
attend
the
residential
Texas
School
for
the
Deaf
here
.
Operating
budget
for
the
day
schools
in
the
five
counties
of
Dallas
,
Harris
,
Bexar
,
Tarrant
and
El
Paso
would
be
$451,500
,
which
would
be
a
savings
of
$157,460
yearly
after
the
first
year's
capital
outlay
of
$88,000
was
absorbed
,
Parkhouse
told
the
Senate
.
The
TEA
estimated
there
would
be
182
scholastics
to
attend
the
day
school
in
Dallas
County
,
saving
them
from
coming
to
Austin
to
live
in
the
state
deaf
school
.
Dallas
may
get
to
hear
a
debate
on
horse
race
parimutuels
soon
between
Reps.
V.
E.
(
Red
)
Berry
and
Joe
Ratcliff
.
While
details
are
still
to
be
worked
out
,
Ratcliff
said
he
expects
to
tell
home
folks
in
Dallas
why
he
thinks
Berry's
proposed
constitutional
amendment
should
be
rejected
.
``
We're
getting
more
'
pro
'
letters
than
'
con
'
on
horse
race
betting
''
,
said
Ratcliff
.
``
But
I
believe
if
people
were
better
informed
on
this
question
,
most
of
them
would
oppose
it
also
.
I'm
willing
to
stake
my
political
career
on
it
''
.
Rep.
Berry
,
an
ex-gambler
from
San
Antonio
,
got
elected
on
his
advocacy
of
betting
on
the
ponies
.
A
House
committee
which
heard
his
local
option
proposal
is
expected
to
give
it
a
favorable
report
,
although
the
resolution
faces
hard
sledding
later
.
The
house
passed
finally
,
and
sent
to
the
Senate
,
a
bill
extending
the
State
Health
Department's
authority
to
give
planning
assistance
to
cities
.
The
senate
quickly
whipped
through
its
meager
fare
of
House
bills
approved
by
committees
,
passing
the
three
on
the
calendar
.
One
validated
acts
of
school
districts
.
Another
enlarged
authority
of
the
Beaumont
Navigation
District
.
The
third
amended
the
enabling
act
for
creation
of
the
Lamar
county
Hospital
District
,
for
which
a
special
constitutional
amendment
previously
was
adopted
.
Without
dissent
,
senators
passed
a
bill
by
Sen.
A.
R.
Schwartz
of
Galveston
authorizing
establishment
in
the
future
of
a
school
for
the
mentally
retarded
in
the
Gulf
Coast
district
.
Money
for
its
construction
will
be
sought
later
on
but
in
the
meantime
the
State
Hospital
board
can
accept
gifts
and
donations
of
a
site
.
Two
tax
revision
bills
were
passed
.
One
,
by
Sen.
Louis
Crump
of
San
Saba
,
would
aid
more
than
17,000
retailers
who
pay
a
group
of
miscellaneous
excise
taxes
by
eliminating
the
requirement
that
each
return
be
notarized
.
Instead
,
retailers
would
sign
a
certificate
of
correctness
,
violation
of
which
would
carry
a
penalty
of
one
to
five
years
in
prison
,
plus
a
$1,000
fine
.
It
was
one
of
a
series
of
recommendations
by
the
Texas
Research
League
.
The
other
bill
,
by
Sen.
A.
M.
Aikin
Jr.
of
Paris
,
would
relieve
real
estate
brokers
,
who
pay
their
own
annual
licensing
fee
,
from
the
$12
annual
occupation
license
on
brokers
in
such
as
stocks
and
bonds
.
Natural
gas
public
utility
companies
would
be
given
the
right
of
eminent
domain
,
under
a
bill
by
Sen.
Frank
Owen
3
,
of
El
Paso
,
to
acquire
sites
for
underground
storage
reservoirs
for
gas
.
Marshall
Formby
of
Plainview
,
former
chairman
of
the
Texas
Highway
Commission
,
suggested
a
plan
to
fill
by
appointment
future
vacancies
in
the
Legislature
and
Congress
,
eliminating
the
need
for
costly
special
elections
.
Under
Formby's
plan
,
an
appointee
would
be
selected
by
a
board
composed
of
the
governor
,
lieutenant
governor
,
speaker
of
the
House
,
attorney
general
and
chief
justice
of
the
Texas
Supreme
Court
.
Austin
,
Texas
--
State
representatives
decided
Thursday
against
taking
a
poll
on
what
kind
of
taxes
Texans
would
prefer
to
pay
.
An
adverse
vote
of
81
to
65
kept
in
the
State
Affairs
Committee
a
bill
which
would
order
the
referendum
on
the
April
4
ballot
,
when
Texas
votes
on
a
U.S.
senator
.
Rep.
Wesley
Roberts
of
Seminole
,
sponsor
of
the
poll
idea
,
said
that
further
delay
in
the
committee
can
kill
the
bill
.
The
West
Texan
reported
that
he
had
finally
gotten
Chairman
Bill
Hollowell
of
the
committee
to
set
it
for
public
hearing
on
Feb.
22
.
The
proposal
would
have
to
receive
final
legislative
approval
,
by
two-thirds
majorities
,
before
March
1
to
be
printed
on
the
April
4
ballot
,
Roberts
said
.
Opponents
generally
argued
that
the
ballot
couldn't
give
enough
information
about
tax
proposals
for
the
voters
to
make
an
intelligent
choice
.
All
Dallas
members
voted
with
Roberts
,
except
Rep.
Bill
Jones
,
who
was
absent
.
Austin
,
Texas
--
Paradise
lost
to
the
alleged
water
needs
of
Texas'
big
cities
Thursday
.
Rep.
James
Cotten
of
Weatherford
insisted
that
a
water
development
bill
passed
by
the
Texas
House
of
Representatives
was
an
effort
by
big
cities
like
Dallas
and
Fort
Worth
to
cover
up
places
like
Paradise
,
a
Wise
County
hamlet
of
250
people
.
When
the
shouting
ended
,
the
bill
passed
,
114
to
4
,
sending
it
to
the
Senate
,
where
a
similar
proposal
is
being
sponsored
by
Sen.
George
Parkhouse
of
Dallas
.
Most
of
the
fire
was
directed
by
Cotten
against
Dallas
and
Sen.
Parkhouse
.
The
bill
would
increase
from
$5,000,000
to
$15,000,000
the
maximum
loan
the
state
could
make
to
a
local
water
project
.
Cotten
construed
this
as
a
veiled
effort
by
Parkhouse
to
help
Dallas
and
other
large
cities
get
money
which
Cotten
felt
could
better
be
spent
providing
water
for
rural
Texas
.
Statements
by
other
legislators
that
Dallas
is
paying
for
all
its
water
program
by
local
bonds
,
and
that
less
populous
places
would
benefit
most
by
the
pending
bill
,
did
not
sway
Cotten's
attack
.
The
bill's
defenders
were
mostly
small-town
legislators
like
J.
W.
Buchanan
of
Dumas
,
Eligio
(
Kika
)
De
La
Garza
of
Mission
,
Sam
F.
Collins
of
Newton
and
Joe
Chapman
of
Sulphur
Springs
.
``
This
is
a
poor
boy's
bill
''
,
said
Chapman
.
``
Dallas
and
Fort
Worth
can
vote
bonds
.
This
would
help
the
little
peanut
districts
''
.
Austin
,
Texas
--
A
Houston
teacher
,
now
serving
in
the
Legislature
,
proposed
Thursday
a
law
reducing
the
time
spent
learning
``
educational
methods
''
.
Rep.
Henry
C.
Grover
,
who
teaches
history
in
the
Houston
public
schools
,
would
reduce
from
24
to
12
semester
hours
the
so-called
``
teaching
methods
''
courses
required
to
obtain
a
junior
or
senior
high
school
teaching
certificate
.
A
normal
year's
work
in
college
is
30
semester
hours
.
Grover
also
would
require
junior-senior
high
teachers
to
have
at
least
24
semester
hours
credit
in
the
subject
they
are
teaching
.
The
remainder
of
the
4-year
college
requirement
would
be
in
general
subjects
.
``
A
person
with
a
master's
degree
in
physics
,
chemistry
,
math
or
English
,
yet
who
has
not
taken
Education
courses
,
is
not
permitted
to
teach
in
the
public
schools
''
,
said
Grover
.
College
teachers
in
Texas
are
not
required
to
have
the
Education
courses
.
Fifty-three
of
the
150
representatives
immediately
joined
Grover
as
co-signers
of
the
proposal
.
Paris
,
Texas
(
sp.
)
--
The
board
of
regents
of
Paris
Junior
College
has
named
Dr.
Clarence
Charles
Clark
of
Hays
,
Kan.
as
the
school's
new
president
.
Dr.
Clark
will
succeed
Dr.
J.
R.
McLemore
,
who
will
retire
at
the
close
of
the
present
school
term
.
Dr.
Clark
holds
an
earned
Doctor
of
Education
degree
from
the
University
of
Oklahoma
.
He
also
received
a
Master
of
Science
degree
from
Texas
A
&
I
College
and
a
Bachelor
of
Science
degree
from
Southwestern
State
College
,
Weatherford
,
Okla.
.
In
addition
,
Dr.
Clark
has
studied
at
Rhode
Island
State
College
and
Massachusetts
Institute
of
Technology
.
During
his
college
career
,
Dr.
Clark
was
captain
of
his
basketball
team
and
was
a
football
letterman
.
Dr.
Clark
has
served
as
teacher
and
principal
in
Oklahoma
high
schools
,
as
teacher
and
athletic
director
at
Raymondville
,
Texas
,
High
School
,
as
an
instructor
at
the
University
of
Oklahoma
,
and
as
an
associate
professor
of
education
at
Fort
Hays
,
Kan.
,
State
College
.
He
has
served
as
a
border
patrolman
and
was
in
the
Signal
Corps
of
the
U.S.
Army
.
Denton
,
Texas
(
sp.
)
--
Principals
of
the
13
schools
in
the
Denton
Independent
School
District
have
been
re-elected
for
the
1961-62
session
upon
the
recommendation
of
Supt.
Chester
O.
Strickland
.
State
and
federal
legislation
against
racial
discrimination
in
employment
was
called
for
yesterday
in
a
report
of
a
``
blue
ribbon
''
citizens
committee
on
the
aid
to
dependent
children
program
.
The
report
,
culminating
a
year
long
study
of
the
ADC
program
in
Cook
county
by
a
New
York
City
welfare
consulting
firm
,
listed
10
long
range
recommendations
designed
to
reduce
the
soaring
ADC
case
load
.
The
report
called
racial
discrimination
in
employment
``
one
of
the
most
serious
causes
of
family
breakdown
,
desertion
,
and
ADC
dependency
''
.
``
Must
solve
problem
''
The
monthly
cost
of
ADC
to
more
than
100,000
recipients
in
the
county
is
4.4
million
dollars
,
said
C.
Virgil
Martin
,
president
of
Carson
Pirie
Scott
&
Co.
,
committee
chairman
.
``
We
must
solve
the
problems
which
have
forced
these
people
to
depend
upon
ADC
for
subsistence
''
,
Martin
said
.
The
volume
of
ADC
cases
will
decrease
,
Martin
reported
,
when
the
community
is
able
to
deal
effectively
with
two
problems
:
Relatively
limited
skills
and
discrimination
in
employment
because
of
color
.
These
,
he
said
,
are
``
two
of
the
principal
underlying
causes
for
family
breakups
leading
to
ADC
''
.
Calls
for
extension
Other
recommendations
made
by
the
committee
are
:
Extension
of
the
ADC
program
to
all
children
in
need
living
with
any
relatives
,
including
both
parents
,
as
a
means
of
preserving
family
unity
.
Research
projects
as
soon
as
possible
on
the
causes
and
prevention
of
dependency
and
illegitimacy
.
Several
defendants
in
the
Summerdale
police
burglary
trial
made
statements
indicating
their
guilt
at
the
time
of
their
arrest
,
Judge
James
B.
Parsons
was
told
in
Criminal
court
yesterday
.
The
disclosure
by
Charles
Bellows
,
chief
defense
counsel
,
startled
observers
and
was
viewed
as
the
prelude
to
a
quarrel
between
the
six
attorneys
representing
the
eight
former
policemen
now
on
trial
.
Bellows
made
the
disclosure
when
he
asked
Judge
Parsons
to
grant
his
client
,
Alan
Clements
,
30
,
a
separate
trial
.
Bellows
made
the
request
while
the
all-woman
jury
was
out
of
the
courtroom
.
Fears
prejudicial
aspects
``
The
statements
may
be
highly
prejudicial
to
my
client
''
,
Bellows
told
the
court
.
``
Some
of
the
defendants
strongly
indicated
they
knew
they
were
receiving
stolen
property
.
It
is
impossible
to
get
a
fair
trial
when
some
of
the
defendants
made
statements
involving
themselves
and
others
''
.
Judge
Parsons
leaned
over
the
bench
and
inquired
,
``
You
mean
some
of
the
defendants
made
statements
admitting
this
''
?
?
``
Yes
,
your
honor
''
,
replied
Bellows
.
``
What
this
amounts
to
,
if
true
,
is
that
there
will
be
a
free-for-all
fight
in
this
case
.
There
is
a
conflict
among
the
defendants
''
.
Washington
,
July
24
--
President
Kennedy
today
pushed
aside
other
White
House
business
to
devote
all
his
time
and
attention
to
working
on
the
Berlin
crisis
address
he
will
deliver
tomorrow
night
to
the
American
people
over
nationwide
television
and
radio
.
The
President
spent
much
of
the
week-end
at
his
summer
home
on
Cape
Cod
writing
the
first
drafts
of
portions
of
the
address
with
the
help
of
White
House
aids
in
Washington
with
whom
he
talked
by
telephone
.
Shortly
after
the
Chief
Executive
returned
to
Washington
in
midmorning
from
Hyannis
Port
,
Mass.
,
a
White
House
spokesman
said
the
address
text
still
had
``
quite
a
way
to
go
''
toward
completion
.
Decisions
are
made
Asked
to
elaborate
,
Pierre
Salinger
,
White
House
press
secretary
,
replied
,
``
I
would
say
it's
got
to
go
thru
several
more
drafts
''
.
Salinger
said
the
work
President
Kennedy
,
advisers
,
and
members
of
his
staff
were
doing
on
the
address
involved
composition
and
wording
,
rather
than
last
minute
decisions
on
administration
plans
to
meet
the
latest
Berlin
crisis
precipitated
by
Russia's
demands
and
proposals
for
the
city
.
The
last
10
cases
in
the
investigation
of
the
Nov.
8
election
were
dismissed
yesterday
by
Acting
Judge
John
M.
Karns
,
who
charged
that
the
prosecution
obtained
evidence
``
by
unfair
and
fundamentally
illegal
means
''
.
Karns
said
that
the
cases
involved
a
matter
``
of
even
greater
significance
than
the
guilt
or
innocence
''
of
the
50
persons
.
He
said
evidence
was
obtained
``
in
violation
of
the
legal
rights
of
citizens
''
.
Karns'
ruling
pertained
to
eight
of
the
10
cases
.
In
the
two
other
cases
he
ruled
that
the
state
had
been
``
unable
to
make
a
case
''
.
Contempt
proceedings
originally
had
been
brought
against
677
persons
in
133
precincts
by
Morris
J.
Wexler
,
special
prosecutor
.
Issue
jury
subpoenas
Wexler
admitted
in
earlier
court
hearings
that
he
issued
grand
jury
subpenas
to
about
200
persons
involved
in
the
election
investigation
,
questioned
the
individuals
in
the
Criminal
courts
building
,
but
did
not
take
them
before
the
grand
jury
.
Mayer
Goldberg
,
attorney
for
election
judges
in
the
58th
precinct
of
the
23d
ward
,
argued
this
procedure
constituted
intimidation
.
Wexler
has
denied
repeatedly
that
coercion
was
used
in
questioning
.
Karns
said
it
was
a
``
wrongful
act
''
for
Wexler
to
take
statements
``
privately
and
outside
of
the
grand
jury
room
''
.
He
said
this
constituted
a
``
very
serious
misuse
''
of
the
Criminal
court
processes
.
``
Actually
,
the
abuse
of
the
process
may
have
constituted
a
contempt
of
the
Criminal
court
of
Cook
county
,
altho
vindication
of
the
authority
of
that
court
is
not
the
function
of
this
court
''
,
said
Karns
,
who
is
a
City
judge
in
East
St.
Louis
sitting
in
Cook
County
court
.
Faced
seven
cases
Karns
had
been
scheduled
this
week
to
hear
seven
cases
involving
35
persons
.
Wexler
had
charged
the
precinct
judges
in
these
cases
with
``
complementary
''
miscount
of
the
vote
,
in
which
votes
would
be
taken
from
one
candidate
and
given
to
another
.
The
cases
involved
judges
in
the
33d
,
24th
,
and
42d
precincts
of
the
31st
ward
,
the
21st
and
28th
precincts
of
the
29th
ward
,
the
18th
precinct
of
the
4th
ward
,
and
the
9th
precinct
of
the
23d
ward
.
The
case
of
the
judges
in
the
58th
precinct
of
the
23d
ward
had
been
heard
previously
and
taken
under
advisement
by
Karns
.
Two
other
cases
also
were
under
advisement
.
Claims
precedent
lacking
After
reading
his
statement
discharging
the
23d
ward
case
,
Karns
told
Wexler
that
if
the
seven
cases
scheduled
for
trial
also
involved
persons
who
had
been
subpenaed
,
he
would
dismiss
them
.
Washington
,
Feb.
9
--
President
Kennedy
today
proposed
a
mammoth
new
medical
care
program
whereby
social
security
taxes
on
70
million
American
workers
would
be
raised
to
pay
the
hospital
and
some
other
medical
bills
of
14.2
million
Americans
over
65
who
are
covered
by
social
security
or
railroad
retirement
programs
.
The
President
,
in
a
special
message
to
Congress
,
tied
in
with
his
aged
care
plan
requests
for
large
federal
grants
to
finance
medical
and
dental
scholarships
,
build
20
new
medical
and
20
new
dental
schools
,
and
expand
child
health
care
and
general
medical
research
.
The
aged
care
plan
,
similar
to
one
the
President
sponsored
last
year
as
a
senator
,
a
fight
on
Capitol
hill
.
It
was
defeated
in
Congress
last
year
.
Cost
up
to
$37
a
year
It
would
be
financed
by
boosting
the
social
security
payroll
tax
by
as
much
as
$37
a
year
for
each
of
the
workers
now
paying
such
taxes
.
The
social
security
payroll
tax
is
now
6
per
cent
--
3
per
cent
on
each
worker
and
employer
--
on
the
first
$4,800
of
pay
per
year
.
The
Kennedy
plan
alone
would
boost
the
base
to
$5,000
a
year
and
the
payroll
tax
to
6.5
per
cent
--
3.25
per
cent
each
.
Similar
payroll
tax
boosts
would
be
imposed
on
those
under
the
railroad
retirement
system
.
The
payroll
tax
would
actually
rise
to
7.5
per
cent
starting
Jan.
1
,
1963
,
if
the
plan
is
approved
,
because
the
levy
is
already
scheduled
to
go
up
by
1
per
cent
on
that
date
to
pay
for
other
social
security
costs
.
Outlays
would
increase
Officials
estimated
the
annual
tax
boost
for
the
medical
plan
would
amount
to
1.5
billion
dollars
and
that
medical
benefits
paid
out
would
run
1
billion
or
more
in
the
first
year
,
1963
.
Both
figures
would
go
higher
in
later
years
.
Other
parts
of
the
Kennedy
health
plan
would
entail
federal
grants
of
750
million
to
1
billion
dollars
over
the
next
10
years
.
These
would
be
paid
for
out
of
general
,
not
payroll
,
taxes
.
Nursing
home
care
The
aged
care
plan
carries
these
benefits
for
persons
over
65
who
are
under
the
social
security
and
railroad
retirement
systems
:
1
Full
payment
of
hospital
bills
for
stays
up
to
90
days
for
each
illness
,
except
that
the
patient
would
pay
$10
a
day
of
the
cost
for
the
first
nine
days
.
2
Full
payment
of
nursing
home
bills
for
up
to
180
days
following
discharge
from
a
hospital
.
A
patient
could
receive
up
to
300
days
paid-for
nursing
home
care
under
a
``
unit
formula
''
allowing
more
of
such
care
for
those
who
use
none
or
only
part
of
the
hospital-care
credit
.
3
Hospital
outpatient
clinic
diagnostic
service
for
all
costs
in
excess
of
$20
a
patient
.
4
Community
visiting
nurse
services
at
home
for
up
to
240
days
an
illness
.
The
President
noted
that
Congress
last
year
passed
a
law
providing
grants
to
states
to
help
pay
medical
bills
of
the
needy
aged
.
Calls
proposal
modest
He
said
his
plan
is
designed
to
``
meet
the
needs
of
those
millions
who
have
no
wish
to
receive
care
at
the
taxpayers'
expense
,
but
who
are
nevertheless
staggered
by
the
drain
on
their
savings
--
or
those
of
their
children
--
caused
by
an
extended
hospital
stay
''
.
``
This
is
a
very
modest
proposal
cut
to
meet
absolutely
essential
needs
''
,
he
said
,
``
and
with
sufficient
'
deductible
'
requirements
to
discourage
any
malingering
or
unnecessary
overcrowding
of
our
hospitals
.
``
This
is
not
a
program
of
socialized
medicine
.
It
is
a
program
of
prepayment
of
health
costs
with
absolute
freedom
of
choice
guaranteed
.
Every
person
will
choose
his
own
doctor
and
hospital
''
.
Wouldn't
pay
doctors
The
plan
does
not
cover
doctor
bills
.
They
would
still
be
paid
by
the
patient
.
Apart
from
the
aged
care
plan
the
President's
most
ambitious
and
costly
proposals
were
for
federal
scholarships
,
and
grants
to
build
or
enlarge
medical
and
dental
schools
.
The
President
said
the
nation's
92
medical
and
47
dental
schools
cannot
now
handle
the
student
load
needed
to
meet
the
rising
need
for
health
care
.
Moreover
,
he
said
,
many
qualified
young
people
are
not
going
into
medicine
and
dentistry
because
they
can't
afford
the
schooling
costs
.
Contributions
to
schools
The
scholarship
plan
would
provide
federal
contributions
to
each
medical
and
dental
school
equal
to
$1,500
a
year
for
one-fourth
of
the
first
year
students
.
The
schools
could
use
the
money
to
pay
4-year
scholarships
,
based
on
need
,
of
up
to
$2,000
a
year
per
student
.
In
addition
,
the
government
would
pay
a
$1,000
``
cost
of
education
''
grant
to
the
schools
for
each
$1,500
in
scholarship
grants
.
Officials
estimated
the
combined
programs
would
cost
5.1
million
dollars
the
first
year
and
would
go
up
to
21
millions
by
1966
.
The
President
recommended
federal
``
matching
grants
''
totaling
700
million
dollars
in
10
years
for
constructing
new
medical
and
dental
schools
or
enlarging
the
capacity
of
existing
ones
.
More
for
nursing
homes
In
the
area
of
``
community
health
services
''
,
the
President
called
for
doubling
the
present
10
million
dollar
a
year
federal
grants
for
nursing
home
construction
.
He
asked
for
another
10
million
dollar
``
initial
''
appropriation
for
``
stimulatory
grants
''
to
states
to
improve
nursing
homes
.
He
further
proposed
grants
of
an
unspecified
sum
for
experimental
hospitals
.
In
the
child
health
field
,
the
President
said
he
will
recommend
later
an
increase
in
funds
for
programs
under
the
children's
bureau
.
He
also
asked
Congress
to
approve
establishment
of
a
national
child
health
institute
.
Asks
research
funds
The
President
said
he
will
ask
Congress
to
increase
grants
to
states
for
vocational
rehabilitation
.
He
did
not
say
by
how
much
.
For
medical
research
he
asked
a
20
million
dollar
a
year
increase
,
from
30
to
50
millions
,
in
matching
grants
for
building
research
facilities
.
The
President
said
he
will
also
propose
increasing
,
by
an
unspecified
amount
,
the
540
million
dollars
in
the
1961-62
budget
for
direct
government
research
in
medicine
.
The
President
said
his
proposals
combine
the
``
indispensable
elements
in
a
sound
health
program
--
people
,
knowledge
,
services
,
facilities
,
and
the
means
to
pay
for
them
''
.
Reaction
as
expected
Congressional
reaction
to
the
message
was
along
expected
lines
.
Legislators
who
last
year
opposed
placing
aged-care
under
the
social
security
system
criticized
the
President's
plan
.
Those
who
backed
a
similar
plan
last
year
hailed
the
message
.
Senate
Republican
Leader
Dirksen
(
Ill.
)
and
House
Republican
Leader
Charles
Halleck
(
Ind.
)
said
the
message
did
not
persuade
them
to
change
their
opposition
to
compulsory
medical
insurance
.
Halleck
said
the
voluntary
care
plan
enacted
last
year
should
be
given
a
fair
trial
first
.
House
Speaker
Sam
Rayburn
(
D.
,
Tex.
)
called
the
Kennedy
program
``
a
mighty
fine
thing
''
,
but
made
no
prediction
on
its
fate
in
the
House
.
Washington
,
Feb.
9
--
Acting
hastily
under
White
House
pressure
,
the
Senate
tonight
confirmed
Robert
C.
Weaver
as
the
nation's
federal
housing
chief
.
Only
11
senators
were
on
the
floor
and
there
was
no
record
vote
.
A
number
of
scattered
``
ayes
''
and
``
noes
''
was
heard
.
Customary
Senate
rules
were
ignored
in
order
to
speed
approval
of
the
Negro
leader
as
administrator
of
the
housing
and
home
finance
agency
.
In
the
last
eight
years
,
all
Presidential
appointments
,
including
those
of
cabinet
rank
,
have
been
denied
immediate
action
because
of
a
Senate
rule
requiring
at
least
a
24
hour
delay
after
they
are
reported
to
the
floor
.
Enforce
by
demand
The
rule
was
enforced
by
demand
of
Sen.
Wayne
Morse
(
D.
,
Ore.
)
in
connection
with
President
Eisenhower's
cabinet
selections
in
1953
and
President
Kennedy's
in
1961
.
Oslo
The
most
positive
element
to
emerge
from
the
Oslo
meeting
of
North
Atlantic
Treaty
Organization
Foreign
Ministers
has
been
the
freer
,
franker
,
and
wider
discussions
,
animated
by
much
better
mutual
understanding
than
in
past
meetings
.
This
has
been
a
working
session
of
an
organization
that
,
by
its
very
nature
,
can
only
proceed
along
its
route
step
by
step
and
without
dramatic
changes
.
In
Oslo
,
the
ministers
have
met
in
a
climate
of
candor
,
and
made
a
genuine
attempt
to
get
information
and
understanding
one
another's
problems
.
This
atmosphere
of
understanding
has
been
particularly
noticeable
where
relations
are
concerned
between
the
``
colonialist
''
powers
and
those
who
have
never
,
or
not
for
a
long
time
,
had
such
problems
.
The
nightmare
of
a
clash
between
those
in
trouble
in
Africa
,
exacerbated
by
the
difficulties
,
changes
,
and
tragedies
facing
them
,
and
other
allies
who
intellectually
and
emotionally
disapprove
of
the
circumstances
that
have
brought
these
troubles
about
,
has
been
conspicuous
by
its
absence
.
Explosion
avoided
In
the
case
of
Portugal
,
which
a
few
weeks
ago
was
rumored
ready
to
walk
out
of
the
NATO
Council
should
critics
of
its
Angola
policy
prove
harsh
,
there
has
been
a
noticeable
relaxation
of
tension
.
The
general
,
remarkably
courteous
,
explanation
has
left
basic
positions
unchanged
,
but
there
has
been
no
explosion
in
the
council
.
There
should
even
be
no
more
bitter
surprises
in
the
UN
General
Assembly
as
to
NATO
members'
votes
,
since
a
new
ad
hoc
NATO
committee
has
been
set
up
so
that
in
the
future
such
topics
as
Angola
will
be
discussed
in
advance
.
Canada
alone
has
been
somewhat
out
of
step
with
the
Oslo
attempt
to
get
all
the
allied
cars
back
on
the
track
behind
the
NATO
locomotive
.
Even
Norway
,
despite
daily
but
limited
manifestations
against
atomic
arms
in
the
heart
of
this
northernmost
capital
of
the
alliance
,
is
today
closer
to
the
NATO
line
.
On
the
negative
side
of
the
balance
sheet
must
be
set
some
disappointment
that
the
United
States
leadership
has
not
been
as
much
in
evidence
as
hoped
for
.
One
diplomat
described
the
tenor
of
Secretary
of
State
Dean
Rusk's
speeches
as
``
inconclusive
''
.
But
he
hastened
to
add
that
,
if
United
States
policies
were
not
always
clear
,
despite
Mr.
Rusk's
analysis
of
the
various
global
danger
points
and
setbacks
for
the
West
,
this
may
merely
mean
the
new
administration
has
not
yet
firmly
fixed
its
policy
.
Exploratory
mood
A
certain
vagueness
may
also
be
caused
by
tactical
appreciation
of
the
fact
that
the
present
council
meeting
is
a
semipublic
affair
,
with
no
fewer
than
six
Soviet
correspondents
accredited
.
The
impression
has
nevertheless
been
given
during
these
three
days
,
despite
Mr.
Rusk's
personal
popularity
,
that
the
United
States
delegation
came
to
Oslo
in
a
somewhat
tentative
and
exploratory
frame
of
mind
,
more
ready
to
listen
and
learn
than
to
enunciate
firm
policy
on
a
global
scale
with
detailed
application
to
individual
danger
spots
.
The
Secretary
of
State
himself
,
in
his
first
speech
,
gave
some
idea
of
the
tremendous
march
of
events
inside
and
outside
the
United
States
that
has
preoccupied
the
new
administration
in
the
past
four
months
.
But
where
the
core
of
NATO
is
concerned
,
the
Secretary
of
State
has
not
only
reiterated
the
United
States'
profound
attachment
to
the
alliance
,
``
cornerstone
''
of
its
foreign
policy
,
but
has
announced
that
five
nuclear
submarines
will
eventually
be
at
NATO's
disposal
in
European
waters
.
The
Secretary
of
State
has
also
solemnly
repeated
a
warning
to
the
Soviet
Union
that
the
United
States
will
not
stand
for
another
setback
in
Berlin
,
an
affirmation
once
again
taken
up
by
the
council
as
a
whole
.
Conflict
surveyed
The
secretary's
greatest
achievement
is
perhaps
the
rekindling
of
NATO
realization
that
East-West
friction
,
wherever
it
take
place
around
the
globe
,
is
in
essence
the
general
conflict
between
two
entirely
different
societies
,
and
must
be
treated
as
such
without
regard
to
geographical
distance
or
lack
of
apparent
connection
.
The
annual
spring
meeting
has
given
an
impetus
in
three
main
directions
:
more
,
deeper
,
and
more
timely
political
consultation
within
the
alliance
,
the
use
of
the
Organization
for
Economic
Cooperation
and
Development
(
when
ratified
)
as
a
method
of
coordinating
aid
to
the
underdeveloped
countries
,
and
the
need
for
strengthening
conventional
forces
as
well
as
the
maintenance
of
the
nuclear
deterrent
.
This
increase
in
the
``
threshold
''
,
as
the
conventional
forces
strengthening
is
called
,
will
prove
one
of
the
alliance's
most
difficult
problems
in
the
months
to
come
.
Each
ally
will
have
to
carry
out
obligations
long
since
laid
down
,
but
never
completely
fulfilled
.
Washington
The
Kennedy
administration
moves
haltingly
toward
a
Geneva
conference
on
Laos
just
as
serious
debate
over
its
foreign
policy
erupts
for
the
first
time
.
There
is
little
optimism
here
that
the
Communists
will
be
any
more
docile
at
the
conference
table
than
they
were
in
military
actions
on
the
ground
in
Laos
.
The
United
States
,
State
Department
officials
explain
,
now
is
mainly
interested
in
setting
up
an
international
inspection
system
which
will
prevent
Laos
from
being
used
as
a
base
for
Communist
attacks
on
neighboring
Thailand
and
South
Viet
Nam
.
They
count
on
the
aid
of
the
neutral
countries
attending
the
Geneva
conference
to
achieve
this
.
The
United
States
hopes
that
any
future
Lao
Cabinet
would
not
become
Communist
dominated
.
But
it
is
apparent
that
no
acceptable
formula
has
been
found
to
prevent
such
a
possibility
.
Policies
modified
The
inclination
here
is
to
accept
a
de
facto
cease-fire
in
Laos
,
rather
than
continue
to
insist
on
a
verification
of
the
cease-fire
by
the
international
control
commission
before
participating
in
the
Geneva
conference
.
This
is
another
of
the
modifications
of
policy
on
Laos
that
the
Kennedy
administration
has
felt
compelled
to
make
.
It
excuses
these
actions
as
being
the
chain
reaction
to
basic
errors
made
in
the
previous
administration
.
Its
spokesmen
insist
that
there
has
not
been
time
enough
to
institute
reforms
in
military
and
economic
aid
policies
in
the
critical
areas
.
But
with
the
months
moving
on
--
and
the
immediate
confrontations
with
the
Communists
showing
no
gain
for
the
free
world
--
the
question
arises
:
How
effective
have
Kennedy
administration
first
foreign
policy
decisions
been
in
dealing
with
Communist
aggression
?
?
Former
Vice-President
Richard
M.
Nixon
in
Detroit
called
for
a
firmer
and
tougher
policy
toward
the
Soviet
Union
.
He
was
critical
of
what
he
feels
is
President
Kennedy's
tendency
to
be
too
conciliatory
.
GOP
restrained
It
does
not
take
a
Gallup
poll
to
find
out
that
most
Republicans
in
Congress
feel
this
understates
the
situation
as
Republicans
see
it
.
They
can
hardly
restrain
themselves
from
raising
the
question
of
whether
Republicans
,
if
they
had
been
in
power
,
would
have
made
``
amateurish
and
monumental
blunders
''
in
Cuba
.
One
Republican
senator
told
this
correspondent
that
he
was
constantly
being
asked
why
he
didn't
attack
the
Kennedy
administration
on
this
score
.
His
reply
,
he
said
,
was
that
he
agreed
to
the
need
for
unity
in
the
country
now
.
But
he
further
said
that
it
was
better
politics
to
let
others
question
the
wisdom
of
administration
policies
first
.
The
Republicans
some
weeks
ago
served
notice
through
Senator
Thruston
B.
Morton
(
R
)
of
Kentucky
,
chairman
of
the
Republican
National
Committee
,
that
the
Kennedy
administration
would
be
held
responsible
if
the
outcome
in
Laos
was
a
coalition
government
susceptible
of
Communist
domination
.
Kennedy
administration
policies
also
have
been
assailed
now
from
another
direction
by
70
Harvard
,
Boston
University
,
Brandeis
,
and
Massachusetts
Institute
of
Technology
educators
.
Detente
urged
This
group
pleads
with
the
administration
to
``
give
no
further
support
for
the
invasion
of
Cuba
by
exile
groups
''
.
It
recommends
that
the
United
States
``
seek
instead
to
detach
the
Castro
regime
from
the
Communist
bloc
by
working
for
a
diplomatic
detente
and
a
resumption
of
trade
relations
;
;
and
concentrate
its
constructive
efforts
on
eliminating
in
other
parts
of
Latin
America
the
social
conditions
on
which
totalitarian
nationalism
feeds
''
.
Mr.
Nixon
,
for
his
part
,
would
oppose
intervention
in
Cuba
without
specific
provocation
.
But
he
did
recommend
that
President
Kennedy
state
clearly
that
if
Communist
countries
shipped
any
further
arms
to
Cuba
that
it
would
not
be
tolerated
.
Until
the
Cuban
fiasco
and
the
Communist
military
victories
in
Laos
,
almost
any
observer
would
have
said
that
President
Kennedy
had
blended
a
program
that
respected
,
generally
,
the
opinions
voiced
both
by
Mr.
Nixon
and
the
professors
.
Aid
plans
revamped
Very
early
in
his
administration
he
informed
the
Kremlin
through
diplomatic
channels
,
a
high
official
source
disclosed
,
that
the
new
administration
would
react
even
tougher
than
the
Eisenhower
administration
would
during
the
formative
period
of
the
administration
.
Strenuous
efforts
were
made
to
remove
pin
pricking
from
administration
statements
.
Policies
on
nuclear
test
ban
negotiations
were
reviewed
and
changed
.
But
thus
far
there
has
been
no
response
in
kind
.
Foreign
aid
programs
were
revamped
to
give
greater
emphasis
to
economic
aid
and
to
encourage
political
reform
in
recipient
nations
.
In
Laos
,
the
administration
looked
at
the
Eisenhower
administration
efforts
to
show
determination
by
sailing
a
naval
fleet
into
Southeast
Asian
waters
as
a
useless
gesture
.
Again
and
again
it
asked
the
Communists
to
``
freeze
''
the
military
situation
in
Laos
.
But
the
Communists
aided
the
Pathet
Lao
at
an
even
faster
rate
.
And
after
several
correspondents
went
into
Pathet
Lao
territory
and
exposed
the
huge
build-up
,
administration
spokesmen
acclaimed
them
for
performing
a
``
great
service
''
and
laid
the
matter
before
the
Southeast
Asia
Treaty
Organization
.
SEATO
was
steamed
up
and
prepared
contingency
plans
for
coping
with
the
military
losses
in
Laos
.
But
the
Communists
never
gave
sufficient
provocation
at
any
one
time
for
the
United
States
to
want
to
risk
a
limited
or
an
all-out
war
over
Laos
.
(
Some
SEATO
nations
disagreed
,
however
.
)
There
was
the
further
complication
that
the
administration
had
very
early
concluded
that
Laos
was
ill
suited
to
be
an
ally
,
unlike
its
more
determined
neighbors
,
Thailand
and
South
Viet
Nam
.
The
administration
declared
itself
in
favor
of
a
neutralized
Laos
.
The
pro-Western
government
,
which
the
United
States
had
helped
in
a
revolt
against
the
Souvanna
Phouma
``
neutralist
''
government
,
never
did
appear
to
spark
much
fighting
spirit
in
the
Royal
Lao
Army
.
There
certainly
was
not
any
more
energy
displayed
after
it
was
clear
the
United
States
would
not
back
the
pro-Western
government
to
the
hilt
.
If
the
administration
ever
had
any
ideas
that
it
could
find
an
acceptable
alternative
to
Prince
Souvanna
Phouma
,
whom
it
felt
was
too
trusting
of
Communists
,
it
gradually
had
to
relinquish
them
.
One
factor
was
the
statement
of
Senator
J.
W.
Fulbright
(
D
)
of
Arkansas
,
chairman
of
the
Senate
Foreign
Relations
Committee
.
He
declared
on
March
25
that
the
United
States
had
erred
a
year
and
a
half
ago
by
``
encouraging
the
removal
''
of
Prince
Souvanna
.
Washington
The
White
House
is
taking
extraordinary
steps
to
check
the
rapid
growth
of
juvenile
delinquency
in
the
United
States
.
The
President
is
deeply
concerned
over
this
problem
and
its
effect
upon
the
``
vitality
of
the
nation
''
.
In
an
important
assertion
of
national
leadership
in
this
field
,
he
has
issued
an
executive
order
establishing
the
President's
committee
on
Juvenile
Delinquency
and
Crime
,
to
be
supported
and
assisted
by
a
Citizens
Advisory
Council
of
recognized
authorities
on
juvenile
problems
.
The
President
asks
the
support
and
cooperation
of
Congress
in
his
efforts
through
the
enactment
of
legislation
to
provide
federal
grants
to
states
for
specified
efforts
in
combating
this
disturbing
crime
trend
.
Offenses
multiply
The
President
has
also
called
upon
the
Attorney
General
,
the
Secretary
of
Health
,
Education
and
Welfare
,
and
the
Secretary
of
Labor
to
coordinate
their
efforts
``
in
the
development
of
a
program
of
federal
leadership
to
assist
states
and
local
communities
in
their
efforts
to
cope
with
the
problem
.
Simultaneously
the
President
announced
Thursday
the
appointment
of
David
L.
Hackett
,
a
special
assistant
to
the
Attorney
General
,
as
executive
director
of
the
new
Committee
on
Juvenile
Delinquency
and
Youth
Crime
.
His
sense
of
urgency
in
this
matter
stems
from
the
fact
that
court
cases
and
juvenile
arrests
have
more
than
doubled
since
1948
,
each
year
showing
an
increase
in
offenders
.
Among
arrests
reported
by
the
Federal
Bureau
of
Investigation
in
1959
,
about
half
for
burglary
and
larceny
involved
persons
under
18
years
of
age
.
East
Providence
should
organize
its
civil
defense
setup
and
begin
by
appointing
a
full-time
director
,
Raymond
H.
Hawksley
,
the
present
city
CD
head
,
believes
.
Mr.
Hawksley
said
yesterday
he
would
be
willing
to
go
before
the
city
council
``
or
anyone
else
locally
''
to
outline
his
proposal
at
the
earliest
possible
time
.
East
Providence
now
has
no
civil
defense
program
.
Mr.
Hawksley
,
the
state's
general
treasurer
,
has
been
a
part-time
CD
director
in
the
city
for
the
last
nine
years
.
He
is
not
interested
in
being
named
a
full-time
director
.
Noting
that
President
Kennedy
has
handed
the
Defense
Department
the
major
responsibility
for
the
nation's
civil
defense
program
,
Mr.
Hawksley
said
the
federal
government
would
pay
half
the
salary
of
a
full-time
local
director
.
He
expressed
the
opinion
the
city
could
hire
a
CD
director
for
about
$3,500
a
year
and
would
only
have
to
put
up
half
that
amount
on
a
matching
fund
basis
to
defray
the
salary
costs
.
Mr.
Hawksley
said
he
believed
there
are
a
number
of
qualified
city
residents
who
would
be
willing
to
take
the
full-time
CD
job
.
One
of
these
men
is
former
Fire
Chief
John
A.
Laughlin
,
he
said
.
Along
with
a
director
,
the
city
should
provide
a
CD
headquarters
so
that
pertinent
information
about
the
local
organization
would
be
centralized
.
Mr.
Hawksley
said
.
One
advantage
that
would
come
to
the
city
in
having
a
full-time
director
,
he
said
,
is
that
East
Providence
would
become
eligible
to
apply
to
the
federal
government
for
financial
aid
in
purchasing
equipment
needed
for
a
sound
civil
defense
program
.
Matching
funds
also
can
be
obtained
for
procurement
of
such
items
as
radios
,
sirens
and
rescue
trucks
,
he
said
.
Mr.
Hawksley
believes
that
East
Providence
could
use
two
more
rescue
trucks
,
similar
to
the
CD
vehicle
obtained
several
years
ago
and
now
detailed
to
the
Central
Fire
Station
.
He
would
assign
one
of
the
rescue
trucks
to
the
Riverside
section
of
the
city
and
the
other
to
the
Rumford
area
.
Speaking
of
the
present
status
of
civil
defense
in
the
city
,
Mr.
Hawksley
said
he
would
be
willing
to
bet
that
not
more
than
one
person
in
a
hundred
would
know
what
to
do
or
where
to
go
in
the
event
of
an
enemy
attack
.
The
Narragansett
Race
Track
grounds
is
one
assembly
point
,
he
said
,
and
a
drive-in
theater
in
Seekonk
would
be
another
.
Riverside
residents
would
go
to
the
Seekonk
assembly
point
.
Mr.
Hawksley
said
he
was
not
critical
of
city
residents
for
not
knowing
what
to
do
or
where
to
assemble
in
case
of
an
air
attack
.
Such
vital
information
,
he
said
,
has
to
be
made
available
to
the
public
frequently
and
at
regular
intervals
for
residents
to
know
.
If
the
city
council
fails
to
consider
appointment
of
a
full-time
CD
director
,
Mr.
Hawksley
said
,
then
he
plans
to
call
a
meeting
early
in
September
so
that
a
civil
defense
organization
will
be
developed
locally
.
One
of
the
first
things
he
would
do
,
he
said
,
would
be
to
organize
classes
in
first
aid
.
Other
steps
would
be
developed
after
information
drifts
down
to
the
local
level
from
the
federal
government
.
Rhode
Island
is
going
to
examine
its
Sunday
sales
law
with
possible
revisions
in
mind
.
Governor
Notte
said
last
night
he
plans
to
name
a
committee
to
make
the
study
and
come
up
with
recommendations
for
possible
changes
in
time
for
the
next
session
of
the
General
Assembly
.
The
governor's
move
into
the
so-called
``
blue
law
''
controversy
came
in
the
form
of
a
letter
to
Miss
Mary
R.
Grant
,
deputy
city
clerk
of
Central
Falls
.
A
copy
was
released
to
the
press
.
Mr.
Notte
was
responding
to
a
resolution
adopted
by
the
Central
Falls
City
Council
on
July
10
and
sent
to
the
state
house
by
Miss
Grant
.
The
resolution
urges
the
governor
to
have
a
complete
study
of
the
Sunday
sales
laws
made
with
an
eye
to
their
revision
at
the
next
session
of
the
legislature
.
While
the
city
council
suggested
that
the
Legislative
Council
might
perform
the
review
,
Mr.
Notte
said
that
instead
he
will
take
up
the
matter
with
Atty.
Gen.
J.
Joseph
Nugent
to
get
``
the
benefit
of
his
views
''
.
He
will
then
appoint
the
study
committee
with
Mr.
Nugent's
cooperation
,
the
governor
said
.
``
I
would
expect
the
proposed
committee
to
hold
public
hearings
''
,
Mr.
Notte
said
,
``
to
obtain
the
views
of
the
general
public
and
religious
,
labor
and
special-interest
groups
affected
by
these
laws
''
.
The
governor
wrote
Miss
Grant
that
he
has
been
concerned
for
some
time
``
with
the
continuous
problem
which
confronts
our
local
and
state
law
enforcement
officers
as
a
result
of
the
laws
regulating
Sunday
sales
''
.
The
attorney
general
has
advised
local
police
that
it
is
their
duty
to
enforce
the
blue
laws
.
Should
there
be
evidence
they
are
shirking
,
he
has
said
,
the
state
police
will
step
into
the
situation
.
There
has
been
more
activity
across
the
state
line
in
Massachusetts
than
in
Rhode
Island
in
recent
weeks
toward
enforcement
of
the
Sunday
sales
laws
.
The
statutes
,
similar
in
both
the
Bay
State
and
Rhode
Island
and
dating
back
in
some
instances
to
colonial
times
,
severely
limit
the
types
of
merchandise
that
may
be
sold
on
the
Sabbath
.
The
Central
Falls
City
Council
expressed
concern
especially
that
more
foods
be
placed
on
the
eligible
list
and
that
neighborhood
grocery
and
variety
stores
be
allowed
to
do
business
on
Sunday
.
The
only
day
they
``
have
a
chance
to
compete
with
large
supermarkets
is
on
Sunday
''
,
the
council's
resolution
said
.
The
small
shops
``
must
be
retained
,
for
they
provide
essential
service
to
the
community
''
,
according
to
the
resolution
,
which
added
that
they
``
also
are
the
source
of
livelihood
for
thousands
of
our
neighbors
''
.
It
declares
that
Sunday
sales
licenses
provide
``
great
revenue
''
to
the
local
government
.
The
council
advised
the
governor
that
``
large
supermarkets
,
factory
outlets
and
department
stores
not
be
allowed
to
do
business
''
on
Sunday
.
They
``
operate
on
a
volume
basis
''
,
it
was
contended
,
``
and
are
not
essential
to
provide
the
more
limited
but
vital
shopping
needs
of
the
community
''
.
Liberals
and
conservatives
in
both
parties
--
Democratic
and
Republican
--
should
divorce
themselves
and
form
two
independent
parties
,
George
H.
Reama
,
nationally
known
labor-management
expert
,
said
here
yesterday
.
Mr.
Reama
told
the
Rotary
Club
of
Providence
at
its
luncheon
at
the
Sheraton-Biltmore
Hotel
that
about
half
of
the
people
in
the
country
want
the
``
welfare
''
type
of
government
and
the
other
half
want
a
free
enterprise
system
.
He
suggested
that
a
regrouping
of
forces
might
allow
the
average
voter
a
better
pull
at
the
right
lever
for
him
on
election
day
.
He
said
he
was
``
confessing
that
I
was
a
member
of
the
Socialist
Party
in
1910
''
.
That
,
he
added
,
was
when
he
was
``
a
very
young
man
,
a
machinist
and
toolmaker
by
trade
.
``
That
was
before
I
studied
law
.
Some
of
my
fellow
workers
were
grooming
me
for
an
office
in
the
Socialist
Party
.
The
lawyer
with
whom
I
studied
law
steered
me
off
the
Socialist
track
.
He
steered
me
to
the
right
track
--
the
free
enterprise
track
''
.
He
said
that
when
he
was
a
Socialist
in
1910
,
the
party
called
for
government
operation
of
all
utilities
and
the
pooling
of
all
resources
.
He
suggested
that
without
the
Socialist
Party
ever
gaining
a
national
victory
,
most
of
its
original
program
has
come
to
pass
under
both
major
parties
.
Mr.
Reama
,
who
retired
as
vice
president
of
the
American
Screw
Co.
in
1955
said
,
``
Both
parties
in
the
last
election
told
us
that
we
need
a
five
per
cent
growth
in
the
gross
national
product
--
but
neither
told
us
how
to
achieve
it
''
.
He
said
he
favors
wage
increases
for
workers
--
``
but
manufacturers
are
caught
in
a
profit
squeeze
''
--
and
raises
should
only
come
when
the
public
is
conditioned
to
higher
prices
,
he
added
.
Indicating
the
way
in
which
he
has
turned
his
back
on
his
1910
philosophy
,
Mr.
Reama
said
:
``
A
Socialist
is
a
person
who
believes
in
dividing
everything
he
does
not
own
''
.
Mr.
Reama
,
far
from
really
being
retired
,
is
engaged
in
industrial
relations
counseling
.
A
petition
bearing
the
signatures
of
more
than
1,700
Johnston
taxpayers
was
presented
to
the
town
council
last
night
as
what
is
hoped
will
be
the
first
step
in
obtaining
a
home
rule
charter
for
the
town
.
William
A.
Martinelli
,
chairman
of
the
Citizens
Group
of
Johnston
,
transferred
the
petitions
from
his
left
hand
to
his
right
hand
after
the
council
voted
to
accept
them
at
the
suggestion
of
Council
President
Raymond
Fortin
Sr.
.
The
law
which
governs
home
rule
charter
petitions
states
that
they
must
be
referred
to
the
chairman
of
the
board
of
canvassers
for
verification
of
the
signatures
within
10
days
and
Mr.
Martinelli
happens
to
hold
that
post
.
Mr.
Martinelli
explained
that
there
should
be
more
than
enough
signatures
to
assure
the
scheduling
of
a
vote
on
the
home
rule
charter
and
possible
election
of
a
nine
member
charter
commission
within
70
days
.
He
explained
that
by
law
the
council
must
establish
procedures
for
a
vote
on
the
issue
within
60
days
after
the
board
of
canvassers
completes
its
work
.
A
difference
of
opinion
arose
between
Mr.
Martinelli
and
John
P.
Bourcier
,
town
solicitor
,
over
the
exact
manner
in
which
the
vote
is
handled
.
Mr.
Martinelli
has
,
in
recent
weeks
,
been
of
the
opinion
that
a
special
town
meeting
would
be
called
for
the
vote
,
while
Mr.
Bourcier
said
that
a
special
election
might
be
called
instead
.
Mr.
Bourcier
said
that
he
had
consulted
several
Superior
Court
justices
in
the
last
week
and
received
opinions
favoring
both
procedures
.
He
assured
Mr.
Martinelli
and
the
council
that
he
would
study
the
correct
method
and
report
back
to
the
council
as
soon
as
possible
.
Mr.
Martinelli
said
yesterday
that
the
Citizens
Group
of
Johnston
will
meet
again
July
24
to
plan
further
strategy
in
the
charter
movement
.
He
said
that
the
group
has
no
candidates
for
the
charter
commission
in
mind
at
present
,
but
that
it
will
undoubtedly
endorse
candidates
when
the
time
comes
.
``
After
inspiring
this
,
I
think
we
should
certainly
follow
through
on
it
''
,
he
declared
.
``
It
has
become
our
responsibility
and
I
hope
that
the
Citizens
Group
will
spearhead
the
movement
''
.
He
said
he
would
not
be
surprised
if
some
of
the
more
than
30
members
of
the
group
are
interested
in
running
on
the
required
non-partisan
ballot
for
posts
on
the
charter
commission
.
``
Our
most
immediate
goal
is
to
increase
public
awareness
of
the
movement
''
,
he
indicated
,
``
and
to
tell
them
what
this
will
mean
for
the
town
''
.
He
expects
that
if
the
present
timetable
is
followed
a
vote
will
be
scheduled
during
the
last
week
in
September
.
Some
opposition
to
the
home
rule
movement
started
to
be
heard
yesterday
,
with
spokesmen
for
the
town's
insurgent
Democratic
leadership
speaking
out
against
the
home
rule
charter
in
favor
of
the
model
municipal
league
charter
.
Increasing
opposition
can
be
expected
in
coming
weeks
,
it
was
indicated
.
Misunderstanding
of
the
real
meaning
of
a
home
rule
charter
was
cited
as
a
factor
which
has
caused
the
Citizens
Group
to
obtain
signatures
under
what
were
termed
``
false
pretenses
''
.
Several
signers
affixed
their
names
,
it
was
learned
,
after
being
told
that
no
tax
increase
would
be
possible
without
consent
of
the
General
Assembly
and
that
a
provision
could
be
included
in
the
charter
to
have
the
town
take
over
the
Johnston
Sanitary
District
sewer
system
.
Action
on
a
new
ordinance
permitting
motorists
who
plead
guilty
to
minor
traffic
offenses
to
pay
fines
at
the
local
police
station
may
be
taken
at
Monday's
special
North
Providence
Town
Council
meeting
.
Council
president
Frank
SanAntonio
said
yesterday
he
may
ask
the
council
to
formally
request
Town
Solicitor
Michael
A.
Abatuno
to
draft
the
ordinance
.
At
the
last
session
of
the
General
Assembly
,
the
town
was
authorized
to
adopt
such
an
ordinance
as
a
means
of
making
enforcement
of
minor
offenses
more
effective
.
Nothing
has
been
done
yet
to
take
advantage
of
the
enabling
legislation
.
At
present
all
offenses
must
be
taken
to
Sixth
District
Court
for
disposition
.
Local
police
have
hesitated
to
prosecute
them
because
of
the
heavy
court
costs
involved
even
for
the
simplest
offense
.
Plainfield
--
James
P.
Mitchell
and
Sen.
Walter
H.
Jones
R-Bergen
,
last
night
disagreed
on
the
value
of
using
as
a
campaign
issue
a
remark
by
Richard
J.
Hughes
,
Democratic
gubernatorial
candidate
,
that
the
GOP
is
``
Campaigning
on
the
carcass
of
Eisenhower
Republicanism
''
.
Mitchell
was
for
using
it
,
Jones
against
,
and
Sen.
Wayne
Dumont
Jr.
R-Warren
did
not
mention
it
when
the
three
Republican
gubernatorial
candidates
spoke
at
staggered
intervals
before
100
persons
at
the
Park
Hotel
.
The
controversial
remark
was
first
made
Sunday
by
Hughes
at
a
Westfield
Young
Democratic
Club
cocktail
party
at
the
Scotch
Plains
Country
Club
.
It
was
greeted
with
a
chorus
of
boos
by
500
women
in
Trenton
Monday
at
a
forum
of
the
State
Federation
of
Women's
Clubs
.
Hughes
said
Monday
,
``
It
is
the
apparent
intention
of
the
Republican
Party
to
campaign
on
the
carcass
of
what
they
call
Eisenhower
Republicanism
,
but
the
heart
stopped
beating
and
the
lifeblood
congealed
after
Eisenhower
retired
.
Now
he's
gone
,
the
Republican
Party
is
not
going
to
be
able
to
sell
the
tattered
remains
to
the
people
of
the
state
''
.
Sunday
he
had
added
,
``
We
can
love
Eisenhower
the
man
,
even
if
we
considered
him
a
mediocre
president
but
there
is
nothing
left
of
the
Republican
Party
without
his
leadership
''
.
Mitchell
said
the
statement
should
become
a
major
issue
in
the
primary
and
the
fall
campaign
.
``
How
can
a
man
with
any
degree
of
common
decency
charge
this
''
?
?
He
asked
.
The
former
secretary
of
labor
said
he
was
proud
to
be
an
Eisenhower
Republican
``
and
proud
to
have
absorbed
his
philosophy
''
while
working
in
his
adminstration
.
Mitchell
said
the
closeness
of
the
outcome
in
last
fall's
Presidential
election
did
not
mean
that
Eisenhower
Republicanism
was
a
dead
issue
.
Regrets
attack
Jones
said
he
regretted
Hughes
had
made
a
personal
attack
on
a
past
president
.
``
He
is
wrong
to
inject
Eisenhower
into
this
campaign
''
,
he
said
,
``
because
the
primary
is
being
waged
on
state
issues
and
I
will
not
be
forced
into
re-arguing
an
old
national
campaign
''
.
The
audience
last
night
did
not
respond
with
either
applause
or
boos
to
mention
of
Hughes'
remark
.
Dumont
spoke
on
the
merit
of
having
an
open
primary
.
He
then
launched
into
what
the
issues
should
be
in
the
campaign
.
State
aid
to
schools
,
the
continuance
of
railroad
passenger
service
,
the
proper
uses
of
surplus
funds
of
the
Port
of
New
York
Authority
,
and
making
New
Jersey
attractive
to
new
industry
.
Decries
joblessness
Mitchell
decried
the
high
rate
of
unemployment
in
the
state
and
said
the
Meyner
administration
and
the
Republican-controlled
State
Senate
``
Must
share
the
blame
for
this
''
.
Noting
that
Plainfield
last
year
had
lost
the
Mack
Truck
Co.
plant
,
he
said
industry
will
not
come
into
this
state
until
there
is
tax
reform
.
``
But
I
am
not
in
favor
of
a
sales
or
state
income
tax
at
this
time
''
,
Mitchell
said
.
Jones
,
unhappy
that
the
candidates
were
limited
to
eight
minutes
for
a
speech
and
no
audience
questions
,
saved
his
barbs
for
Mitchell
.
He
said
Mitchell
is
against
the
centralization
of
government
in
Washington
but
looks
to
the
Kennedy
Administration
for
aid
to
meet
New
Jersey
school
and
transportation
crises
.
``
He
calls
for
help
while
saying
he
is
against
centralization
,
but
you
can't
have
it
both
ways
''
,
Jones
said
.
The
state
is
now
faced
with
the
immediate
question
of
raising
new
taxes
whether
on
utilities
,
real
estate
or
motor
vehicles
,
he
said
,
``
and
I
challenge
Mitchell
to
tell
the
people
where
he
stands
on
the
tax
issue
''
.
Defends
Ike
Earlier
,
Mitchell
said
in
a
statement
:
``
I
think
that
all
Americans
will
resent
deeply
the
statements
made
about
President
Eisenhower
by
Richard
J.
Hughes
.
His
reference
to
'
discredited
carcass
'
or
'
tattered
remains
'
of
the
president's
leadership
is
an
insult
to
the
man
who
led
our
forces
to
victory
in
the
greatest
war
in
all
history
,
to
the
man
who
was
twice
elected
overwhelmingly
by
the
American
people
as
president
of
the
United
States
,
and
who
has
been
the
symbol
to
the
world
of
the
peace-loving
intentions
of
the
free
nations
.
``
I
find
it
hard
to
understand
how
anyone
seeking
a
position
in
public
life
could
demonstrate
such
poor
judgment
and
bad
taste
.
``
Such
a
vicious
statement
can
only
have
its
origin
in
the
desire
of
a
new
political
candidate
to
try
to
make
his
name
known
by
condemning
a
man
of
world
stature
.
It
can
only
rebound
to
Mr.
Hughes'
discredit
''
.
Sees
Jones
ahead
Sen.
Charles
W.
Sandman
,
R-Cape
May
,
said
today
Jones
will
run
well
ahead
of
his
GOP
opponents
for
the
gubernatorial
nomination
.
Sandman
,
state
campaign
chairman
for
Jones
,
was
addressing
a
meeting
in
the
Military
Park
Hotel
,
Newark
,
of
Essex
County
leaders
and
campaign
managers
for
Jones
.
Sandman
told
the
gathering
that
reports
from
workers
on
a
local
level
all
over
the
state
indicate
that
Jones
will
be
chosen
the
Republican
Party's
nominee
with
the
largest
majority
given
a
candidate
in
recent
years
.
Sandman
said
:
``
The
announcement
that
Sen.
Clifford
Case
Aj
,
has
decided
to
spend
all
his
available
time
campaigning
for
Mr.
Mitchell
is
a
dead
giveaway
.
It
is
a
desperate
effort
to
prop
up
a
sagging
candidate
who
has
proven
he
cannot
answer
any
questions
about
New
Jersey's
problems
.
``
We
have
witnessed
in
this
campaign
the
effort
to
project
Mr.
Mitchell
as
the
image
of
a
unity
candidate
from
Washington
.
That
failed
.
``
We
are
now
witnessing
an
effort
to
transfer
to
Mr.
Mitchell
some
of
the
glow
of
Sen.
Case's
candidacy
of
last
year
.
That
,
too
,
will
fail
''
.
Sandman
announced
the
appointment
of
Mrs.
Harriet
Copeland
Greenfield
of
330
Woodland
Ave.
,
Westfield
,
as
state
chairman
of
the
Republican
Women
for
Jones
Committee
.
Mrs.
Greenfield
is
president
of
the
Westfield
Women's
Republican
Club
and
is
a
Westfield
county
committeewoman
.
County
Supervisor
Weldon
R.
Sheets
,
who
is
a
candidate
for
the
Democratic
gubernatorial
nomination
,
today
called
for
an
end
to
paper
ballots
in
those
counties
in
the
state
which
still
use
them
.
The
proposal
,
Sheets
said
,
represents
part
of
his
program
for
election
reforms
necessary
to
make
democracy
in
New
Jersey
more
than
a
``
lip
service
word
''
.
Sheets
said
that
his
proposed
law
would
offer
state
financing
aid
for
the
purchase
of
voting
machines
,
enabling
counties
to
repay
the
loan
over
a
10-year
period
without
interest
or
charge
.
Sheets
added
that
he
would
ask
for
exclusive
use
of
voting
machines
in
the
state
by
January
,
1964
.
Although
he
pointed
out
that
mandatory
legislation
impinging
on
home
rule
is
basically
distasteful
,
he
added
that
the
vital
interest
in
election
results
transcended
county
lines
.
The
candidacy
of
Mayor
James
J.
Sheeran
of
West
Orange
,
for
the
Republican
nomination
for
sheriff
of
Essex
County
,
was
supported
today
by
Edward
W.
Roos
,
West
Orange
public
safety
commissioner
.
Sheeran
,
a
lawyer
and
former
FBI
man
is
running
against
the
Republican
organization's
candidate
,
Freeholder
William
MacDonald
,
for
the
vacancy
left
by
the
resignation
of
Neil
Duffy
,
now
a
member
of
the
State
Board
of
Tax
Appeals
.
``
My
experience
as
public
safety
commissioner
''
,
Roos
said
,
``
has
shown
me
that
the
office
of
sheriff
is
best
filled
by
a
man
with
law
enforcement
experience
,
and
preferably
one
who
is
a
lawyer
.
Jim
Sheeran
fits
that
description
''
.
Trenton
--
William
J.
Seidel
,
state
fire
warden
in
the
Department
of
Conservation
and
Economic
Development
,
has
retired
after
36
years
of
service
.
A
citation
from
Conservation
Commissioner
Salvatore
A.
Bontempo
credits
his
supervision
with
a
reduction
in
the
number
of
forest
fires
in
the
state
.
Seidel
joined
the
department
in
1925
as
a
division
fire
warden
after
graduation
in
1921
from
the
University
of
Michigan
with
a
degree
in
forestry
and
employment
with
private
lumber
companies
.
In
October
1944
,
he
was
appointed
state
warden
and
chief
of
the
Forest
Fire
Section
.
Under
his
supervision
,
the
state
fire-fighting
agency
developed
such
techniques
as
plowing
of
fire
lines
and
established
a
fleet
of
tractor
plows
and
tractor
units
for
fire
fighting
.
He
also
expanded
and
modernized
the
radio
system
with
a
central
control
station
.
He
introduced
regular
briefing
sessions
for
district
fire
wardens
and
first
aid
training
for
section
wardens
.
He
is
credited
with
setting
up
an
annual
co-operative
fire
prevention
program
in
co-operation
with
the
Red
Cross
and
State
Department
of
Education
.
Boonton
--
Richard
J.
Hughes
made
his
Morris
County
debut
in
his
bid
for
the
Democratic
gubernatorial
nomination
here
last
night
with
a
pledge
``
to
carry
the
issues
to
every
corner
of
the
state
''
.
He
promised
nearly
200
Democratic
county
committee
members
at
the
meeting
in
the
Puddingstone
Inn
:
``
When
I
come
back
here
after
the
November
election
you'll
think
,
'
You're
my
man
--
you're
the
kind
of
governor
we're
glad
we
elected
'
''
.
He
said
,
``
We
Democrats
must
resolve
our
issues
on
the
test
of
what
is
right
and
just
,
and
not
what
is
expedient
at
the
time
''
.
Attacks
Republicans
In
his
only
attack
on
the
Republicans
,
Hughes
said
,
``
The
three
Republican
candidates
for
governor
are
tripping
over
their
feet
for
popular
slogans
to
win
the
primary
.
But
we'll
have
a
liberal
,
well
planned
,
forward
looking
,
honest
platform
.
We'll
not
talk
out
of
one
side
of
our
mouth
in
Morris
County
and
out
of
the
other
side
in
Hudson
.
``
We'll
take
the
truth
to
the
people
,
and
the
people
will
like
the
truth
and
elect
their
candidate
and
party
in
November
''
.
He
said
,
``
You
can
see
signs
of
the
Republicans'
feeble
attack
on
the
Meyner
administration
.
But
I
shall
campaign
on
the
Meyner
record
to
meet
the
needs
of
the
years
ahead
''
.
He
urged
New
Jersey
to
``
become
a
full
partner
in
the
courageous
actions
of
President
Kennedy
''
.
He
called
for
a
greater
attraction
of
industry
and
a
stop
to
the
piracy
of
industry
by
Southern
states
,
and
a
strong
fight
against
discrimination
in
business
and
industry
.
``
We
must
keep
the
bloodstream
of
New
Jersey
clean
''
,
the
former
Superior
Court
judge
said
.
``
To
prevent
hoodlums
from
infiltrating
the
state
as
they
did
in
the
Republican
administration
in
the
early
1940s
''
.
Calling
the
Democrats
the
``
party
that
lives
,
breathes
and
thinks
for
the
good
of
the
people
''
,
Hughes
asked
,
``
a
representative
Democratic
vote
in
the
primary
for
a
springboard
toward
victory
in
November
''
.
Hughes
supported
Gov.
Meyner's
``
Green
Acres
''
plan
for
saving
large
tracts
of
open
land
from
the
onrush
of
urban
development
.
He
said
legislation
for
a
$60
million
bond
issue
to
underwrite
the
program
is
expected
to
be
introduced
Monday
.
Conservation
plan
The
plan
will
provide
$45
million
for
purchase
of
open
land
by
the
state
.
The
other
$15
million
is
to
be
alloted
to
municipalities
on
a
matching
fund
basis
.
Hughes
said
,
``
This
is
not
a
plan
to
conquer
space
--
but
to
conserve
it
''
,
pointing
out
the
state
population
has
increased
125,000
each
year
since
1950
.
He
said
``
Morris
County
is
rapidly
changing
and
unless
steps
are
taken
to
preserve
the
green
areas
,
there
will
be
no
land
left
to
preserve
''
.
Hughes
would
not
comment
on
tax
reforms
or
other
issues
in
which
the
Republican
candidates
are
involved
.
He
said
no
matter
what
stand
he
takes
it
would
be
misconstrued
that
he
was
sympathetic
to
one
or
the
other
of
the
Republicans
.
``
After
the
primary
''
,
he
promised
,
``
I'll
be
explicit
on
where
I
stand
to
bring
you
a
strong
,
dynamic
administration
.
I'm
not
afraid
to
tangle
with
the
Republican
nominee
''
.
Trenton
--
Fifteen
members
of
the
Republican
State
Committee
who
are
retiring
--
voluntarily
--
this
year
were
honored
yesterday
by
their
colleagues
.
The
outgoing
members
,
whose
four-year
terms
will
expire
a
week
after
the
April
18
primary
election
,
received
carved
wooden
elephants
,
complete
with
ivory
tusks
,
to
remember
the
state
committee
by
.
There
may
be
other
1961
state
committee
retirements
come
April
18
,
but
they
will
be
leaving
by
choice
of
the
Republican
voters
.
A
special
presentation
was
made
to
Mrs.
Geraldine
Thompson
of
Red
Bank
,
who
is
stepping
down
after
35
years
on
the
committee
.
She
also
was
the
original
GOP
national
committeewoman
from
New
Jersey
in
the
early
1920s
following
adoption
of
the
women's
suffrage
amendment
.
She
served
one
four-year
term
on
the
national
committee
.
Resentment
welled
up
yesterday
among
Democratic
district
leaders
and
some
county
leaders
at
reports
that
Mayor
Wagner
had
decided
to
seek
a
third
term
with
Paul
R.
Screvane
and
Abraham
D.
Beame
as
running
mates
.
At
the
same
time
reaction
among
anti-organization
Democratic
leaders
and
in
the
Liberal
party
to
the
Mayor's
reported
plan
was
generally
favorable
.
Some
anti-organization
Democrats
saw
in
the
program
an
opportunity
to
end
the
bitter
internal
fight
within
the
Democratic
party
that
has
been
going
on
for
the
last
three
years
.
The
resentment
among
Democratic
organization
leaders
to
the
reported
Wagner
plan
was
directed
particularly
at
the
Mayor's
efforts
to
name
his
own
running
mates
without
consulting
the
leaders
.
Some
viewed
this
attempt
as
evidence
that
Mr.
Wagner
regarded
himself
as
bigger
than
the
party
.
Opposition
reported
Some
Democratic
district
and
county
leaders
are
reported
trying
to
induce
State
Controller
Arthur
Levitt
of
Brooklyn
to
oppose
Mr.
Wagner
for
the
Mayoral
nomination
in
the
Sept.
7
Democratic
primary
.
These
contend
there
is
a
serious
question
as
to
whether
Mr.
Wagner
has
the
confidence
of
the
Democratic
rank
and
file
in
the
city
.
Their
view
is
that
last-minute
changes
the
Mayor
is
proposing
to
make
in
the
Democratic
ticket
only
emphasize
the
weakness
of
his
performance
as
Mayor
.
In
an
apparent
effort
to
head
off
such
a
rival
primary
slate
,
Mr.
Wagner
talked
by
telephone
yesterday
with
Representative
Charles
A.
Buckley
,
the
Bronx
Democratic
leader
,
and
with
Joseph
T.
Sharkey
,
the
Brooklyn
Democratic
leader
.
Mayor
visits
Buckley
As
usual
,
he
made
no
attempt
to
get
in
touch
with
Carmine
G.
De
Sapio
,
the
Manhattan
leader
.
He
is
publicly
on
record
as
believing
Mr.
De
Sapio
should
be
replaced
for
the
good
of
the
party
.
Last
night
the
Mayor
visited
Mr.
Buckley
at
the
Bronx
leader's
home
for
a
discussion
of
the
situation
.
Apparently
he
believes
Mr.
Buckley
holds
the
key
to
the
Democratic
organization's
acceptance
of
his
choices
for
running
mates
without
a
struggle
.
In
talks
with
Mr.
Buckley
last
week
in
Washington
,
the
Mayor
apparently
received
the
Bronx
leader's
assent
to
dropping
Controller
Lawrence
E.
Gerosa
,
who
lives
in
the
Bronx
,
from
this
year's
ticket
.
But
Mr.
Buckley
seems
to
have
assumed
he
would
be
given
the
right
to
pick
Mr.
Gerosa's
successor
.
Screvane
and
Beame
hailed
The
Mayor
declined
in
two
interviews
with
reporters
yesterday
to
confirm
or
deny
the
reports
that
he
had
decided
to
run
and
wanted
Mr.
Screvane
,
who
lives
in
Queens
,
to
replace
Abe
Stark
,
the
incumbent
,
as
the
candidate
for
President
of
the
City
Council
and
Mr.
Beame
,
who
lives
in
Brooklyn
,
to
replace
Mr.
Gerosa
as
the
candidate
for
Controller
.
The
Mayor
spoke
yesterday
at
the
United
Irish
Counties
Feis
on
the
Hunter
College
Campus
in
the
Bronx
.
After
his
speech
,
reporters
asked
him
about
the
report
of
his
political
intentions
,
published
in
yesterday's
New
York
Times
.
The
Mayor
said
:
``
It
didn't
come
from
me
.
But
as
I
have
said
before
,
if
I
announce
my
candidacy
,
I
will
have
something
definite
to
say
about
running
mates
''
.
Boston
,
June
16
--
A
wave
of
public
resentment
against
corruption
in
government
is
rising
in
Massachusetts
.
There
is
a
tangible
feeling
in
the
air
of
revulsion
toward
politics
.
The
taxi
driver
taking
the
visitor
from
the
airport
remarks
that
politicians
in
the
state
are
``
all
the
same
''
.
``
It's
'
See
Joe
,
see
Jim
'
''
,
he
says
.
``
The
hand
is
out
''
.
A
political
scientist
writes
of
the
growth
of
``
alienated
voters
''
,
who
``
believe
that
voting
is
useless
because
politicians
or
those
who
influence
politicians
are
corrupt
,
selfish
and
beyond
popular
control
.
These
voters
view
the
political
process
as
a
secret
conspiracy
,
the
object
of
which
is
to
plunder
them
''
.
Corruption
is
hardly
a
recent
development
in
the
city
and
state
that
were
widely
identified
as
the
locale
of
Edwin
O'Connor's
novel
,
``
The
Last
Hurrah
''
.
But
there
are
reasons
for
the
current
spotlight
on
the
subject
.
A
succession
of
highly
publicized
scandals
has
aroused
the
public
within
the
last
year
.
Graft
in
the
construction
of
highways
and
other
public
works
has
brought
on
state
and
Federal
investigations
.
And
the
election
of
President
Kennedy
has
attracted
new
attention
to
the
ethical
climate
of
his
home
state
.
A
reader
of
the
Boston
newspapers
can
hardly
escape
the
impression
that
petty
chicanery
,
or
worse
,
is
the
norm
in
Massachusetts
public
life
.
Day
after
day
some
new
episode
is
reported
.
The
state
Public
Works
Department
is
accused
of
having
spent
$8,555
to
build
a
private
beach
for
a
state
judge
on
his
waterfront
property
.
An
assistant
attorney
general
is
directed
to
investigate
.
Washington
,
June
18
--
Congress
starts
another
week
tomorrow
with
sharply
contrasting
forecasts
for
the
two
chambers
.
In
the
Senate
,
several
bills
are
expected
to
pass
without
any
major
conflict
or
opposition
.
In
the
House
,
the
Southern-Republican
coalition
is
expected
to
make
another
major
stand
in
opposition
to
the
Administration's
housing
bill
,
while
more
jockeying
is
expected
in
an
attempt
to
advance
the
aid-to-education
bill
.
The
housing
bill
is
now
in
the
House
Rules
Committee
.
It
is
expected
to
be
reported
out
Tuesday
,
but
this
is
a
little
uncertain
.
The
panel's
action
depends
on
the
return
of
Representative
James
W.
Trimble
,
Democrat
of
Arkansas
,
who
has
been
siding
with
Speaker
Sam
Rayburn's
forces
in
the
Rules
Committee
in
moving
bills
to
the
floor
.
Mr.
Trimble
has
been
in
the
hospital
but
is
expected
back
Tuesday
.
Leadership
is
hopeful
The
housing
bill
is
expected
to
encounter
strong
opposition
by
the
coalition
of
Southern
Democrats
and
conservative
Republicans
.
The
Democratic
leadership
,
however
,
hopes
to
pass
it
sometime
this
week
.
The
$6,100,000,000
measure
,
which
was
passed
last
Monday
by
the
Senate
,
provides
for
forty-year
mortgages
at
low
down-payments
for
moderate-income
families
.
It
also
provides
for
funds
to
clear
slums
and
help
colleges
build
dormitories
.
The
education
bill
appears
to
be
temporarily
stalled
in
the
Rules
Committee
,
where
two
Northern
Democratic
members
who
usually
vote
with
the
Administration
are
balking
because
of
the
religious
controversy
.
They
are
James
J.
Delaney
of
Queens
and
Thomas
P.
O'Neill
Jr.
of
Massachusetts
.
Three
groups
to
meet
What
could
rescue
the
bill
would
be
some
quick
progress
on
a
bill
amending
the
National
Defense
Education
Act
of
1958
.
This
would
provide
for
long-term
Federal
loans
for
construction
of
parochial
and
other
private-school
facilities
for
teaching
science
,
languages
and
mathematics
.
Mr.
Delaney
and
Mr.
O'Neill
are
not
willing
to
vote
on
the
public-school
measure
until
the
defense
education
bill
clears
the
House
Education
and
Labor
Committee
.
About
half
of
all
Peace
Corps
projects
assigned
to
voluntary
agencies
will
be
carried
out
by
religious
groups
,
according
to
an
official
of
the
corps
.
In
the
$40,000,000
budget
that
has
been
submitted
for
Congressional
approval
,
$26,000,000
would
be
spent
through
universities
and
private
voluntary
agencies
.
Twelve
projects
proposed
by
private
groups
are
at
the
contract-negotiation
stage
,
Gordon
Boyce
,
director
of
relations
with
the
voluntary
agencies
,
said
in
a
Washington
interview
.
Six
of
these
were
proposed
by
religious
groups
.
They
will
be
for
teaching
,
agriculture
and
community
development
in
Southeast
Asia
,
Africa
,
the
Middle
East
and
Latin
America
.
Question
raised
Interviews
with
several
church
leaders
have
disclosed
that
this
development
has
raised
the
question
whether
the
Peace
Corps
will
be
able
to
prevent
confusion
for
church
and
state
over
methods
,
means
and
goals
.
There
are
a
number
of
ways
this
could
happen
,
the
churchmen
pointed
out
,
and
here
is
an
example
:
Last
month
in
Ghana
an
American
missionary
discovered
when
he
came
to
pay
his
hotel
bill
that
the
usual
rate
had
been
doubled
.
When
he
protested
,
the
hotel
owner
said
:
``
Why
do
you
worry
?
?
The
U.
S.
Government
is
paying
for
it
.
The
U.
S.
Government
pays
for
all
its
overseas
workers
''
.
Missionary
explains
``
I
don't
work
for
the
Government
''
,
the
American
said
.
``
I'm
a
missionary
''
.
The
hotel
owner
shrugged
.
``
Same
thing
''
,
he
said
.
And
then
,
some
churchmen
remarked
,
there
is
a
more
classical
church-state
problem
:
Can
religious
agencies
use
Government
funds
and
Peace
Corps
personnel
in
their
projects
and
still
preserve
the
constitutional
requirement
on
separation
of
church
and
state
?
?
R.
Sargent
Shriver
Jr.
,
director
of
the
corps
,
is
certain
that
they
can
.
No
religious
group
,
he
declared
in
an
interview
,
will
receive
Peace
Corps
funds
unless
it
forswears
all
proselytizing
on
the
project
it
proposes
.
Moscow
,
June
18
--
At
a
gay
party
in
the
Kremlin
for
President
Sukarno
of
Indonesia
,
Premier
Khrushchev
pulled
out
his
pockets
and
said
,
beaming
:
``
Look
,
he
took
everything
I
had
''
!
!
Mr.
Khrushchev
was
jesting
in
the
expansive
mood
of
the
successful
banker
.
Indonesia
is
one
of
the
twenty
under-developed
countries
of
Asia
,
Africa
and
Latin
America
that
are
receiving
Soviet
aid
.
The
Soviet
Union
and
other
members
of
the
Communist
bloc
are
rapidly
expanding
their
economic
,
technical
and
military
assistance
to
the
uncommitted
nations
.
The
Communist
countries
allocated
more
than
$1,000,000,000
in
economic
aid
alone
last
year
,
according
to
Western
estimates
.
This
was
the
biggest
annual
outlay
since
the
Communist
program
for
the
under-developed
countries
made
its
modest
beginning
in
1954
.
In
1960
more
than
6,000
Communist
technicians
were
present
in
those
countries
.
United
Nations
,
N.
Y.
,
June
18
--
A
committee
of
experts
has
recommended
that
a
country's
population
be
considered
in
the
distribution
of
professional
posts
at
the
United
Nations
.
This
was
disclosed
today
by
a
responsible
source
amid
intensified
efforts
by
the
Soviet
Union
to
gain
a
greater
role
in
the
staff
and
operation
of
the
United
Nations
.
One
effect
of
the
proposal
,
which
puts
a
premium
on
population
instead
of
economic
strength
,
as
in
the
past
,
would
be
to
take
jobs
from
European
nations
and
give
more
to
such
countries
as
India
.
India
is
the
most
populous
United
Nations
member
with
more
than
400,000,000
inhabitants
.
The
new
formula
for
filling
staff
positions
in
the
Secretariat
is
one
of
a
number
of
recommendations
made
by
a
panel
of
eight
in
a
long
and
detailed
report
.
The
report
was
completed
after
nearly
eighteen
months
of
work
on
the
question
of
the
organization
of
the
United
Nations
.
Formula
is
due
this
week
The
Advisory
Committee
on
Administrative
and
Budgetary
Questions
is
expected
to
receive
the
report
this
week
.
The
jobs
formula
is
understood
to
follow
these
lines
:
Each
of
the
organization's
ninety-nine
members
would
get
two
professional
posts
,
such
as
political
affairs
officer
,
a
department
head
or
an
economist
,
to
start
.
Each
member
would
get
one
post
for
each
10,000,000
people
in
its
population
up
to
150,000,000
people
or
a
maximum
of
fifteen
posts
.
Each
member
with
a
population
above
150,000,000
would
get
one
additional
post
for
each
additional
30,000,000
people
up
to
an
unspecified
cut-off
point
.
Geneva
,
June
18
--
The
three
leaders
of
Laos
agreed
today
to
begin
negotiations
tomorrow
on
forming
a
coalition
government
that
would
unite
the
war-ridden
kingdom
.
The
decision
was
made
in
Zurich
by
Prince
Boun
Oum
,
Premier
of
the
pro-Western
royal
Government
;
;
Prince
Souvanna
Phouma
,
leader
of
the
nation's
neutralists
and
recognized
as
Premier
by
the
Communist
bloc
,
and
Prince
Souphanouvong
,
head
of
the
pro-Communist
Pathet
Lao
forces
.
The
latter
two
are
half-brothers
.
Their
joint
statement
was
welcomed
by
the
Western
delegations
who
will
attend
tomorrow
the
nineteenth
plenary
session
of
the
fourteen-nation
conference
on
the
future
of
Laos
.
An
agreement
among
the
Princes
on
a
coalition
government
would
ease
their
task
,
diplomats
conceded
.
But
no
one
was
overly
optimistic
.
Tactics
studied
in
Geneva
W.
Averell
Harriman
of
the
United
States
,
Malcolm
MacDonald
of
Britain
,
Maurice
Couve
De
Murville
,
France's
Foreign
Minister
,
and
Howard
C.
Green
,
Canada's
Minister
of
External
Affairs
,
concluded
,
meanwhile
,
a
round
of
consultations
here
on
future
tactics
in
the
conference
.
The
pace
of
the
talks
has
slowed
with
each
passing
week
.
Princess
Moune
,
Prince
Souvanna
Phouma's
young
daughter
,
read
the
Princes'
statement
.
They
had
a
two-hour
luncheon
together
in
``
an
atmosphere
of
cordial
understanding
and
relaxation
''
,
she
said
.
The
three
Laotians
agreed
upon
a
six-point
agenda
for
their
talks
,
which
are
to
last
three
days
.
The
Princess
said
it
was
too
early
to
say
what
would
be
decided
if
no
agreement
was
reached
after
three
days
.
To
deal
with
principles
The
meetings
in
Zurich
,
the
statement
said
,
would
deal
only
with
principles
that
would
guide
the
three
factors
in
their
search
for
a
coalition
Government
.
Appointment
of
William
S.
Pfaff
Jr.
,
41
,
as
promotion
manager
of
The
Times-Picayune
Publishing
Company
was
announced
Saturday
by
John
F.
Tims
,
president
of
the
company
.
Pfaff
succeeds
Martin
Burke
,
who
resigned
.
The
new
promotion
manager
has
been
employed
by
the
company
since
January
,
1946
,
as
a
commercial
artist
in
the
advertising
department
.
He
is
a
native
of
New
Orleans
and
attended
Allen
Elementary
school
,
Fortier
High
school
and
Soule
business
college
.
From
June
,
1942
,
until
December
,
1945
,
Pfaff
served
in
the
Army
Air
Corps
.
While
in
the
service
he
attended
radio
school
at
Scott
Field
in
Belleville
,
Ill.
.
Before
entering
the
service
,
Pfaff
for
five
years
did
clerical
work
with
a
general
merchandising
and
wholesale
firm
in
New
Orleans
.
He
is
married
to
the
former
Audrey
Knecht
and
has
a
daughter
,
Karol
,
13
.
They
reside
at
4911
Miles
Dr.
.
Washington
--
Thousands
of
bleacher-type
seats
are
being
erected
along
Pennsylvania
Avenue
between
the
Capitol
and
the
White
House
for
the
big
inaugural
parade
on
Jan.
20
.
Assuming
the
weather
is
halfway
decent
that
day
,
hundreds
of
thousands
of
persons
will
mass
along
this
thoroughfare
as
President
John
F.
Kennedy
and
retiring
President
Dwight
D.
Eisenhower
leave
Capitol
Hill
following
the
oath-taking
ceremonies
and
ride
down
this
historic
ceremonial
route
.
Pennsylvania
Avenue
,
named
for
one
of
the
original
13
states
,
perhaps
is
not
the
most
impressive
street
in
the
District
of
Columbia
from
a
commercial
standpoint
.
But
from
a
historic
viewpoint
none
can
approach
it
.
Many
buildings
Within
view
of
the
avenue
are
some
of
the
United
States
government's
tremendous
buildings
,
plus
shrines
and
monuments
.
Of
course
,
1600
Pennsylvania
,
the
White
House
,
is
the
most
famous
address
of
the
free
world
.
Within
an
easy
walk
from
Capitol
Hill
where
Pennsylvania
Avenue
comes
together
with
Constitution
Avenue
,
begins
a
series
of
great
federal
buildings
,
some
a
block
long
and
all
about
seven-stories
high
.
Great
chapters
of
history
have
been
recorded
along
the
avenue
,
now
about
169
years
old
.
In
the
early
spring
of
1913
a
few
hundred
thousand
persons
turned
out
to
watch
5000
women
parade
.
They
were
the
suffragettes
and
they
wanted
to
vote
.
In
the
1920
presidential
election
they
had
that
right
and
many
of
them
did
vote
for
the
first
time
.
Seats
on
square
Along
this
avenue
which
saw
marching
soldiers
from
the
War
Between
the
States
returning
in
1865
is
the
National
Archives
building
where
hundreds
of
thousands
of
this
country's
most
valuable
records
are
kept
.
Also
the
department
of
justice
building
is
located
where
J.
Edgar
Hoover
presides
over
the
federal
bureau
of
investigation
.
Street
car
tracks
run
down
the
center
of
Pennsylvania
,
powered
with
lines
that
are
underground
.
Many
spectators
will
be
occupying
seats
and
vantage
points
bordering
Lafayette
Square
,
opposite
the
White
House
.
In
this
historic
square
are
several
statues
,
but
the
one
that
stands
out
over
the
others
is
that
of
Gen.
Andrew
Jackson
,
hero
of
the
Battle
of
New
Orleans
.
Moving
past
the
presidential
viewing
stand
and
Lafayette
Square
will
be
at
least
40
marching
units
.
About
16,000
military
members
of
all
branches
of
the
armed
forces
will
take
part
in
the
parade
.
Division
one
of
the
parade
will
be
the
service
academies
.
Division
two
will
include
the
representations
of
Massachusetts
and
Texas
,
the
respective
states
of
the
President
and
of
Vice-President
L.
B.
Johnson
.
Then
will
come
nine
other
states
in
the
order
of
their
admission
to
the
union
.
Division
three
will
be
headed
by
the
Marines
followed
by
12
states
;
;
division
four
will
be
headed
by
the
Navy
,
followed
by
11
states
;
;
division
five
,
by
the
Air
Force
followed
by
11
states
.
Division
six
will
be
headed
by
the
Coast
Guard
,
followed
by
the
reserve
forces
of
all
services
,
five
states
,
Puerto
Rico
,
the
Virgin
Islands
,
Guam
,
American
Samoa
,
the
trust
territories
and
the
Canal
Zone
.
Jackson
,
Miss.
--
What
does
1961
offer
in
political
and
governmental
developments
in
Mississippi
?
?
Even
for
those
who
have
been
observing
the
political
scene
a
long
time
,
no
script
from
the
past
is
worth
very
much
in
gazing
into
the
state's
immediate
political
future
.
This
is
largely
because
of
the
unpredictability
of
the
man
who
operates
the
helm
of
the
state
government
and
is
the
elected
leader
of
its
two
million
inhabitants
--
Gov.
Ross
Barnett
.
Barnett
,
who
came
into
office
with
no
previous
experience
in
public
administration
,
has
surrounded
himself
with
confusion
which
not
only
keeps
his
foes
guessing
but
his
friends
as
well
.
Consequently
,
it
is
uncertain
after
nearly
12
months
in
office
just
which
direction
the
Barnett
administration
will
take
in
the
coming
year
.
Could
be
scramble
Some
predict
the
administration
will
settle
down
during
1961
and
iron
out
the
rough
edges
which
it
has
had
thus
far
.
The
builtin
headache
of
the
Barnett
regime
thus
far
has
been
the
steady
stream
of
job-seekers
and
others
who
feel
they
were
given
commitments
by
Barnett
at
some
stage
of
his
eight-year
quest
for
the
governor's
office
.
There
are
many
who
predict
that
should
Barnett
decide
to
call
the
Legislature
back
into
special
session
,
it
will
really
throw
his
administration
into
a
scramble
.
Certainly
nobody
will
predict
that
the
next
time
the
lawmakers
come
back
together
Barnett
will
be
able
to
enjoy
a
re-enactment
of
the
strange
but
successful
``
honeymoon
''
he
had
in
the
1960
legislative
session
.
If
Barnett
doesn't
call
a
special
session
in
1961
,
it
will
be
the
first
year
in
the
last
decade
that
the
Legislature
has
not
met
in
regular
or
special
session
.
The
odds
favor
a
special
session
,
more
than
likely
early
in
the
year
.
Districts
issue
Legislators
always
get
restless
for
a
special
session
(
whether
for
the
companionship
or
the
$22.50
per
diem
is
not
certain
)
and
if
they
start
agitating
.
Barnett
is
not
expected
to
be
able
to
withstand
the
pressure
.
The
issue
which
may
make
it
necessary
to
have
a
session
is
the
highly
sensitive
problem
of
cutting
the
state's
congressional
districts
from
six
to
five
to
eliminate
one
congressional
seat
.
With
eyes
focused
on
the
third
congressional
district
,
the
historic
Delta
district
,
and
Congressman
Frank
E.
Smith
as
the
one
most
likely
to
go
,
the
redistricting
battle
will
put
to
a
test
the
longstanding
power
which
lawmakers
from
the
Delta
have
held
in
the
Legislature
.
Mississippi's
relations
with
the
national
Democratic
party
will
be
at
a
crossroads
during
1961
,
with
the
first
Democratic
president
in
eight
years
in
the
White
House
.
Split
badly
during
the
recent
presidential
election
into
almost
equally
divided
camps
of
party
loyalists
and
independents
,
the
Democratic
party
in
Mississippi
is
currently
a
wreck
.
And
there
has
been
no
effort
since
the
election
to
pull
it
back
together
.
Future
clouded
Barnett
,
as
the
titular
head
of
the
Democratic
party
,
apparently
must
make
the
move
to
reestablish
relations
with
the
national
Democratic
party
or
see
a
movement
come
from
the
loyalist
ranks
to
completely
bypass
him
as
a
party
functionary
.
With
a
Democratic
administration
,
party
patronage
would
normally
begin
to
flow
to
Mississippi
if
it
had
held
its
Democratic
solidarity
in
the
November
election
.
Now
,
the
picture
is
clouded
,
and
even
US
Sens.
James
O.
Eastland
and
John
C.
Stennis
,
who
remained
loyal
to
the
ticket
,
are
uncertain
of
their
status
.
Reports
are
that
it
is
more
than
probable
that
the
four
congressmen
from
Mississippi
who
did
not
support
the
party
ticket
will
be
stripped
of
the
usual
patronage
which
flows
to
congressmen
.
Baton
Rouge
,
La.
--
The
Gov.
Jimmie
H.
Davis
administration
appears
to
face
a
difficult
year
in
1961
,
with
the
governor's
theme
of
peace
and
harmony
subjected
to
severe
stresses
.
The
year
will
probably
start
out
with
segregation
still
the
most
troublesome
issue
.
But
it
might
give
way
shortly
to
another
vexing
issue
--
that
of
finances
in
state
government
.
The
transition
from
segregation
to
finances
might
already
be
in
progress
,
in
the
form
of
an
administration
proposal
to
hike
the
state
sales
tax
from
2
per
cent
to
3
per
cent
.
The
administration
has
said
the
sales
tax
proposal
is
merely
part
of
the
segregation
strategy
,
since
the
revenues
from
the
increase
would
be
dedicated
to
a
grant
in
aid
program
.
But
the
tardiness
of
the
administration
in
making
the
dedication
has
caused
legislators
to
suspect
the
tax
bill
was
related
more
directly
to
an
over-all
shortage
of
cash
than
to
segregation
.
Legislators
weary
Indeed
,
the
administration's
curious
position
on
the
sales
tax
was
a
major
factor
in
contributing
to
its
defeat
.
The
administration
could
not
say
why
$28
million
was
needed
for
a
grant-in-aid
program
.
The
effectiveness
of
the
governor
in
clearing
up
some
of
the
inconsistencies
revolving
about
the
sales
tax
bill
may
play
a
part
in
determining
whether
it
can
muster
the
required
two-thirds
vote
.
The
tax
bill
will
be
up
for
reconsideration
Wednesday
in
the
House
when
the
Legislature
reconvenes
.
Davis
may
use
the
tax
bill
as
a
means
to
effect
a
transition
from
special
sessions
of
the
Legislature
to
normalcy
.
If
it
fails
to
pass
,
he
can
throw
up
his
hands
and
say
the
Legislature
would
not
support
him
in
his
efforts
to
prevent
integration
.
He
could
terminate
special
sessions
of
the
Legislature
.
Actually
,
Davis
would
have
to
toss
in
the
towel
soon
anyway
.
Many
legislators
are
already
weary
and
frustrated
over
the
so-far
losing
battle
to
block
token
integration
.
This
is
not
the
sort
of
thing
most
politicos
would
care
to
acknowledge
publicly
.
They
would
like
to
convey
the
notion
something
is
being
done
,
even
though
it
is
something
they
know
to
be
ineffectual
.
Underlying
concern
Passage
of
the
sales
tax
measure
would
also
give
Davis
the
means
to
effect
a
transition
.
He
could
tell
the
Legislature
they
had
provided
the
needed
funds
to
carry
on
the
battle
.
Then
he
could
tell
them
to
go
home
,
while
the
administration
continued
to
wage
the
battle
with
the
$28
million
in
extra
revenues
the
sales
tax
measure
would
bring
in
over
an
eight
months
period
.
It
is
difficult
to
be
certain
how
the
administration
views
that
$28
million
,
since
the
views
of
one
leader
may
not
be
the
same
as
the
views
of
another
one
.
But
if
the
administration
should
find
it
does
not
need
the
$28
million
for
a
grant-in-aid
program
,
a
not
unlikely
conclusion
,
it
could
very
well
seek
a
way
to
use
the
money
for
other
purposes
.
This
would
be
in
perfect
consonance
with
the
underlying
concern
in
the
administration
--
the
shortage
of
cash
.
It
could
become
an
acute
problem
in
the
coming
fiscal
year
.
If
the
administration
does
not
succeed
in
passing
the
sales
tax
bill
,
or
any
other
tax
bill
,
it
could
very
well
be
faced
this
spring
at
the
fiscal
session
of
the
Legislature
with
an
interesting
dilemma
.
Since
the
constitution
forbids
introduction
of
a
tax
bill
at
a
fiscal
session
,
the
administration
will
either
have
to
cut
down
expenses
or
inflate
its
estimates
of
anticipated
revenues
.
Constant
problem
In
either
case
,
it
could
call
a
special
session
of
the
Legislature
later
in
1961
to
make
another
stab
at
raising
additional
revenues
through
a
tax
raiser
.
The
prospect
of
cutting
back
spending
is
an
unpleasant
one
for
any
governor
.
It
is
one
that
most
try
to
avoid
,
as
long
as
they
can
see
an
alternative
approach
to
the
problem
.
But
if
all
alternatives
should
be
clearly
blocked
off
,
it
can
be
expected
the
Davis
administration
will
take
steps
to
trim
spending
at
the
spring
session
of
the
state
Legislature
.
This
might
be
done
to
arouse
those
who
have
been
squeezed
out
by
the
trims
to
exert
pressure
on
the
Legislature
,
so
it
would
be
more
receptive
to
a
tax
proposal
later
in
the
year
.
A
constant
problem
confronting
Davis
on
any
proposals
for
new
taxes
will
be
the
charge
by
his
foes
that
he
has
not
tried
to
economize
.
Any
tax
bill
also
will
revive
allegations
that
some
of
his
followers
have
been
using
their
administration
affiliations
imprudently
to
profit
themselves
.
The
new
year
might
see
some
house-cleaning
,
either
genuine
or
token
,
depending
upon
developments
,
to
give
Davis
an
opportunity
to
combat
some
of
these
criticisms
.
City
Controller
Alexander
Hemphill
charged
Tuesday
that
the
bids
on
the
Frankford
Elevated
repair
project
were
rigged
to
the
advantage
of
a
private
contracting
company
which
had
``
an
inside
track
''
with
the
city
.
Estimates
of
the
city's
loss
in
the
$344,000
job
have
ranged
as
high
as
$200,000
.
Shortcuts
unnoticed
Hemphill
said
that
the
Hughes
Steel
Erection
Co.
contracted
to
do
the
work
at
an
impossibly
low
cost
with
a
bid
that
was
far
less
than
the
``
legitimate
''
bids
of
competing
contractors
.
The
Hughes
concern
then
took
``
shortcuts
''
on
the
project
but
got
paid
anyway
,
Hemphill
said
.
The
Controller's
charge
of
rigging
was
the
latest
development
in
an
investigation
which
also
brought
these
disclosures
Tuesday
:
The
city
has
sued
for
the
full
amount
of
the
$172,400
performance
bond
covering
the
contract
.
The
Philadelphia
Transportation
Co.
is
investigating
the
part
its
organization
played
in
reviewing
the
project
.
The
signature
of
Harold
V.
Varani
,
former
director
of
architecture
and
engineering
in
the
Department
of
Public
Property
,
appeared
on
payment
vouchers
certifying
work
on
the
project
.
Varani
has
been
fired
on
charges
of
accepting
gifts
from
the
contractor
.
Managing
Director
Donald
C.
Wagner
has
agreed
to
cooperate
fully
with
Hemphill
after
a
period
of
sharp
disagreement
on
the
matter
.
The
announcement
that
the
city
would
sue
for
recovery
on
the
performance
bond
was
made
by
City
Solicitor
David
Berger
at
a
press
conference
following
a
meeting
in
the
morning
with
Wagner
and
other
officials
of
the
city
and
the
PTC
as
well
as
representatives
of
an
engineering
firm
that
was
pulled
off
the
El
project
before
its
completion
in
1959
.
Concern
bankrupt
The
Hughes
company
and
the
Consolidated
Industries
,
Inc.
,
both
of
3646
N.
2d
St.
,
filed
for
reorganization
under
the
Federal
bankruptcy
law
.
On
Monday
,
the
Hughes
concern
was
formally
declared
bankrupt
after
its
directors
indicated
they
could
not
draw
up
a
plan
for
reorganization
.
Business
relations
between
the
companies
and
city
have
been
under
investigation
by
Hemphill
and
District
Attorney
James
C.
Crumlish
,
Jr.
.
Intervenes
in
case
The
suit
was
filed
later
in
the
day
in
Common
Pleas
Court
7
against
the
Hughes
company
and
two
bonding
firms
.
Travelers
Indemnity
Co.
and
the
Continental
Casualty
Co.
.
At
Berger's
direction
,
the
city
also
intervened
in
the
Hughes
bankruptcy
case
in
U.
S.
District
Court
in
a
move
preliminary
to
filing
a
claim
there
.
``
I
am
taking
the
position
that
the
contract
was
clearly
violated
''
,
Berger
said
.
The
contract
violations
mostly
involve
failure
to
perform
rehabilitation
work
on
expansion
joints
along
the
El
track
.
The
contract
called
for
overhauling
of
102
joints
.
The
city
paid
for
work
on
75
,
of
which
no
more
than
21
were
repaired
,
Hemphill
charged
.
Wide
range
in
bids
Hemphill
said
the
Hughes
concern
contracted
to
do
the
repairs
at
a
cost
of
$500
for
each
joint
.
The
bid
from
A.
Belanger
and
Sons
of
Cambridge
,
Mass.
,
which
listed
the
same
officers
as
Hughes
,
was
$600
per
joint
.
But
,
Hemphill
added
,
bids
from
other
contractors
ranged
from
$2400
to
$3100
per
joint
.
Berger's
decision
to
sue
for
the
full
amount
of
the
performance
bond
was
questioned
by
Wagner
in
the
morning
press
conference
.
Wagner
said
the
city
paid
only
$37,500
to
the
Hughes
company
.
``
We
won't
know
the
full
amount
until
we
get
a
full
report
''
,
Wagner
said
.
``
We
can
claim
on
the
maximum
amount
of
the
bond
''
,
Berger
said
.
Wagner
replied
,
``
Can't
you
just
see
the
headline
:
'
City
Hooked
for
$172,000
'
''
?
?
'
know
enough
to
sue
'
Berger
insisted
that
``
we
know
enough
to
sue
for
the
full
amount
''
.
Douglas
M.
Pratt
,
president
of
the
PTC
,
who
attended
the
meeting
,
said
the
transit
company
is
reviewing
the
work
on
the
El
.
``
We
want
to
find
out
who
knew
about
it
''
,
Pratt
said
.
``
Certain
people
must
have
known
about
it
''
.
``
The
PTC
is
investigating
the
whole
matter
''
,
Pratt
said
.
Samuel
D.
Goodis
,
representing
the
Philadelphia
Hotel
Association
,
objected
on
Tuesday
to
a
proposed
boost
by
the
city
in
licensing
fees
,
saying
that
occupancy
rates
in
major
hotels
here
ranged
from
48
to
74
percent
last
year
.
Goodis
voiced
his
objection
before
City
Council's
Finance
Committee
.
For
hotels
with
1000
rooms
,
the
increased
license
fee
would
mean
an
expense
of
$5000
a
year
,
Goodis
said
.
Testifies
at
hearing
His
testimony
came
during
a
hearing
on
a
bill
raising
fees
for
a
wide
variety
of
licenses
,
permits
and
city
services
.
The
new
fees
are
expected
to
raise
an
additional
$740,000
in
the
remainder
of
1961
and
$2,330,000
more
a
year
after
that
.
The
ordinance
would
increase
the
fee
for
rooming
houses
,
hotels
and
multi-family
dwellings
to
$5
a
room
.
The
cost
of
a
license
now
is
$2
,
with
an
annual
renewal
fee
of
$1
.
Goodis
said
that
single
rooms
account
for
95
percent
of
the
accomodations
in
some
hotels
.
Revenue
estimated
The
city
expects
the
higher
rooming
house
,
hotel
and
apartment
house
fees
to
bring
in
an
additional
$457,000
a
year
.
The
increase
also
was
opposed
by
Leonard
Kaplan
,
spokesman
for
the
Home
Builders
Association
of
Philadelphia
,
on
behalf
of
association
members
who
operate
apartment
houses
.
A
proposal
to
raise
dog
license
fees
drew
an
objection
from
Councilwoman
Virginia
Knauer
,
who
formerly
raised
pedigreed
dogs
.
The
ordinance
would
increase
fees
from
$1
for
males
and
$2
for
females
to
a
flat
$5
a
dog
.
Commissioner
replies
Mrs.
Knauer
said
she
did
not
think
dog
owners
should
be
penalized
for
the
city's
services
to
animal
care
.
In
reply
,
Deputy
Police
Commissioner
Howard
R.
Leary
said
that
the
city
spends
more
than
$115,000
annually
to
license
and
regulate
dogs
but
collects
only
$43,000
in
fees
.
He
reported
that
the
city's
contributions
for
animal
care
included
$67,000
to
the
Women's
S.P.C.A.
;
;
$15,000
to
pay
six
policemen
assigned
as
dog
catchers
and
$15,000
to
investigate
dog
bites
.
Backs
higher
fees
City
Finance
Director
Richard
J.
McConnell
indorsed
the
higher
fees
,
which
,
he
said
,
had
been
under
study
for
more
than
a
year
.
The
city
is
not
adequately
compensated
for
the
services
covered
by
the
fees
,
he
said
.
The
new
fee
schedule
also
was
supported
by
Commissioner
of
Licenses
and
Inspections
Barnet
Lieberman
and
Health
Commissioner
Eugene
A.
Gillis
.
Petitions
asking
for
a
jail
term
for
Norristown
attorney
Julian
W.
Barnard
will
be
presented
to
the
Montgomery
County
Court
Friday
,
it
was
disclosed
Tuesday
by
Horace
A.
Davenport
,
counsel
for
the
widow
of
the
man
killed
last
Nov.
1
by
Barnard's
hit-run
car
.
The
petitions
will
be
presented
in
open
court
to
President
Judge
William
F.
Dannehower
,
Davenport
said
.
Barnard
,
who
pleaded
no
defense
to
manslaughter
and
hit-run
charges
,
was
fined
$500
by
Judge
Warren
K.
Hess
,
and
placed
on
two
years'
probation
providing
he
does
not
drive
during
that
time
.
He
was
caught
driving
the
day
after
the
sentence
was
pronounced
and
given
a
warning
.
Victim
of
the
accident
was
Robert
Lee
Stansbery
,
39
.
His
widow
started
the
circulation
of
petitions
after
Barnard
was
reprimanded
for
violating
the
probation
.
The
City
Planning
Commission
on
Tuesday
approved
agreements
between
two
redevelopers
and
the
Redevelopment
Authority
for
the
purchase
of
land
in
the
$300,000,000
Eastwick
Redevelopment
Area
project
.
The
commission
also
approved
a
novel
plan
that
would
eliminate
traffic
hazards
for
pedestrians
in
the
project
.
One
of
the
agreements
calls
for
the
New
Eastwick
Corp.
to
purchase
a
1311
acre
tract
for
$12,192,865
.
The
tract
is
bounded
by
Island
Ave.
,
Dicks
Ave.
,
61st
St.
,
and
Eastwick
Ave.
.
Four
parks
planned
It
is
designated
as
Stage
1
Residential
on
the
Redevelopment
Authority's
master
plan
and
will
feature
row
houses
,
garden
apartments
,
four
small
parks
,
schools
,
churches
,
a
shopping
center
and
several
small
clusters
of
stores
.
The
corporation
was
formed
by
the
Reynolds
Metal
Co.
and
the
Samuel
A.
and
Henry
A.
Berger
firm
,
a
Philadelphia
builder
,
for
work
in
the
project
.
The
second
agreement
permits
the
authority
to
sell
a
520-acre
tract
west
of
Stage
1
Residential
to
Philadelphia
Builders
Eastwick
Corp.
,
a
firm
composed
of
10
Philadelphia
area
builders
,
which
is
interested
in
developing
part
of
the
project
.
Would
bar
vehicles
The
plan
for
eliminating
traffic
hazards
for
pedestrians
was
developed
by
Dr.
Constantinos
A.
Doxiadis
,
former
Minister
of
Reconstruction
in
Greece
and
a
consulting
planner
for
the
New
Eastwick
Corp.
.
The
plan
calls
for
dividing
the
project
into
16
sectors
which
would
be
barred
to
vehicular
traffic
.
It
provides
for
a
series
of
landscaped
walkways
and
a
central
esplanade
that
would
eventually
run
through
the
center
of
the
entire
two-and-a-half-mile
length
of
the
project
.
The
esplanade
eliminates
Grovers
Ave.
,
which
on
original
plans
ran
through
the
center
of
the
development
.
The
esplanade
would
feature
pedestrian
bridges
over
roads
in
the
project
.
Kansas
City
,
Mo.
,
Feb.
9
(
UPI
)
--
The
president
of
the
Kansas
City
local
of
the
International
Association
of
Fire
Fighters
was
severly
injured
today
when
a
bomb
tore
his
car
apart
as
he
left
home
for
work
.
Battalion
Chief
Stanton
M.
Gladden
,
42
,
the
central
figure
in
a
representation
dispute
between
the
fire
fighters
association
and
the
teamsters
union
,
suffered
multiple
fractures
of
both
ankles
.
He
was
in
Baptist
Memorial
hospital
.
Ignition
sets
off
blast
The
battalion
chief
said
he
had
just
gotten
into
his
1958
model
automobile
to
move
it
from
the
driveway
of
his
home
so
that
he
could
take
his
other
car
to
work
.
``
I'd
just
turned
on
the
ignition
when
there
was
a
big
flash
and
I
was
lying
on
the
driveway
''
,
he
said
.
Gladden's
wife
and
two
of
his
sons
,
John
,
17
,
and
Jim
,
13
,
were
inside
the
house
.
The
younger
boy
said
the
blast
knocked
him
out
of
bed
and
against
the
wall
.
Hood
flies
over
house
The
explosion
sent
the
hood
of
the
car
flying
over
the
roof
of
the
house
.
The
left
front
wheel
landed
100
feet
away
.
Police
laboratory
technicians
said
the
explosive
device
,
containing
either
TNT
or
nitroglycerine
,
was
apparently
placed
under
the
left
front
wheel
.
It
was
first
believed
the
bomb
was
rigged
to
the
car's
starter
.
Gladden
had
been
the
target
of
threatening
telephone
calls
in
recent
months
and
reportedly
received
one
last
night
.
The
fire
department
here
has
been
torn
for
months
by
dissension
involving
top
personnel
and
the
fight
between
the
fire
fighters
association
and
the
teamsters
union
.
Led
fight
on
teamsters
Gladden
has
been
an
outspoken
critic
of
the
present
city
administration
and
led
his
union's
battle
against
the
teamsters
,
which
began
organizing
city
firemen
in
1959
.
The
fire
fighters
association
here
offered
a
$5,000
reward
for
information
leading
to
the
arrest
of
the
person
or
persons
responsible
for
the
bombing
.
A
$500
reward
was
offered
by
the
association's
local
in
Kansas
City
,
Kas.
.
The
association
said
it
would
post
24
hour
guards
at
Gladden's
home
and
at
those
of
James
Mining
and
Eugene
Shiflett
.
Mining
is
secretary-treasurer
of
the
local
and
Shiflett
is
a
member
of
its
executive
committee
.
Both
have
been
active
in
the
association
.
Ankara
,
Turkey
,
Oct.
24
(
AP
)
--
Turkish
political
leaders
bowed
today
to
military
pressure
and
agreed
to
form
an
emergency
national
front
government
with
Gen.
Cemal
Gursel
as
president
.
An
agreement
between
the
leaders
of
four
parties
which
contested
indecisive
elections
on
Oct.
15
was
reached
after
almost
18
hours
of
political
bargaining
under
the
threat
of
an
army
coup
d'etat
.
By-passing
the
military
junta
which
has
ruled
Turkey
since
the
overthrow
of
Premier
Adnan
Menderes
17
months
ago
,
the
army
general
staff
,
led
by
Gen.
Cedvet
Sunay
,
had
set
a
deadline
for
the
parties
to
join
in
a
national
coalition
government
.
The
army
leaders
threatened
to
form
a
new
military
government
if
the
parties
failed
to
sign
an
eight
point
protocol
agreeing
on
Gen.
Gursel
as
president
.
Gen.
Gursel
has
headed
the
military
junta
the
last
17
months
.
The
military
also
had
demanded
pledges
that
there
would
be
no
changes
in
the
laws
passed
by
the
junta
and
no
leaders
of
the
Menderes
regime
now
in
prison
would
be
pardoned
.
Party
leaders
came
out
of
the
final
meeting
apparently
satisfied
and
stated
that
complete
agreement
had
been
reached
on
a
solution
to
the
crisis
created
by
the
elections
which
left
no
party
with
enough
strength
to
form
a
government
on
its
own
.
Vincent
G.
Ierulli
has
been
appointed
temporary
assistant
district
attorney
,
it
was
announced
Monday
by
Charles
E.
Raymond
,
District
Attorney
.
Ierulli
will
replace
Desmond
D.
Connall
who
has
been
called
to
active
military
service
but
is
expected
back
on
the
job
by
March
31
.
Ierulli
,
29
,
has
been
practicing
in
Portland
since
November
,
1959
.
He
is
a
graduate
of
Portland
University
and
the
Northwestern
College
of
Law
.
He
is
married
and
the
father
of
three
children
.
Helping
foreign
countries
to
build
a
sound
political
structure
is
more
important
than
aiding
them
economically
,
E.
M.
Martin
,
assistant
secretary
of
state
for
economic
affairs
told
members
of
the
World
Affairs
Council
Monday
night
.
Martin
,
who
has
been
in
office
in
Washington
,
D.
C.
,
for
13
months
spoke
at
the
council's
annual
meeting
at
the
Multnomah
Hotel
.
He
told
some
350
persons
that
the
United
States'
challenge
was
to
help
countries
build
their
own
societies
their
own
ways
,
following
their
own
paths
.
``
We
must
persuade
them
to
enjoy
a
way
of
life
which
,
if
not
identical
,
is
congenial
with
ours
''
,
he
said
but
adding
that
if
they
do
not
develop
the
kind
of
society
they
themselves
want
it
will
lack
ritiuality
and
loyalty
.
Patience
needed
Insuring
that
the
countries
have
a
freedom
of
choice
,
he
said
,
was
the
biggest
detriment
to
the
Soviet
Union
.
He
cited
East
Germany
where
after
15
years
of
Soviet
rule
it
has
become
necessary
to
build
a
wall
to
keep
the
people
in
,
and
added
,
``
so
long
as
people
rebel
,
we
must
not
give
up
''
.
Martin
called
for
patience
on
the
part
of
Americans
.
``
The
countries
are
trying
to
build
in
a
decade
the
kind
of
society
we
took
a
century
to
build
''
,
he
said
.
By
leaving
our
doors
open
the
United
States
gives
other
peoples
the
opportunity
to
see
us
and
to
compare
,
he
said
.
Individual
help
best
``
We
have
no
reason
to
fear
failure
,
but
we
must
be
extraordinarily
patient
''
,
the
assistant
secretary
said
.
Economically
,
Martin
said
,
the
United
States
could
best
help
foreign
countries
by
helping
them
help
themselves
.
Private
business
is
more
effective
than
government
aid
,
he
explained
,
because
individuals
are
able
to
work
with
the
people
themselves
.
The
United
States
must
plan
to
absorb
the
exported
goods
of
the
country
,
at
what
he
termed
a
``
social
cost
''
.
Martin
said
the
government
has
been
working
to
establish
firmer
prices
on
primary
products
which
may
involve
the
total
income
of
one
country
.
The
Portland
school
board
was
asked
Monday
to
take
a
positive
stand
towards
developing
and
coordinating
with
Portland's
civil
defense
more
plans
for
the
city's
schools
in
event
of
attack
.
But
there
seemed
to
be
some
difference
of
opinion
as
to
how
far
the
board
should
go
,
and
whose
advice
it
should
follow
.
The
board
members
,
after
hearing
the
coordination
plea
from
Mrs.
Ralph
H.
Molvar
,
1409
SW
Maplecrest
Dr.
,
said
they
thought
they
had
already
been
cooperating
.
Chairman
C.
Richard
Mears
pointed
out
that
perhaps
this
was
not
strictly
a
school
board
problem
,
in
case
of
atomic
attack
,
but
that
the
board
would
cooperate
so
far
as
possible
to
get
the
children
to
where
the
parents
wanted
them
to
go
.
Dr.
Melvin
W.
Barnes
,
superintendent
,
said
he
thought
the
schools
were
waiting
for
some
leadership
,
perhaps
on
the
national
level
,
to
make
sure
that
whatever
steps
of
planning
they
took
would
``
be
more
fruitful
''
,
and
that
he
had
found
that
other
school
districts
were
not
as
far
along
in
their
planning
as
this
district
.
``
Los
Angeles
has
said
they
would
send
the
children
to
their
homes
in
case
of
disaster
''
,
he
said
.
``
Nobody
really
expects
to
evacuate
.
I
think
everybody
is
agreed
that
we
need
to
hear
some
voice
on
the
national
level
that
would
make
some
sense
and
in
which
we
would
have
some
confidence
in
following
.
Mrs.
Molvar
,
who
kept
reiterating
her
request
that
they
``
please
take
a
stand
''
,
said
,
``
We
must
have
faith
in
somebody
--
on
the
local
level
,
and
it
wouldn't
be
possible
for
everyone
to
rush
to
a
school
to
get
their
children
''
.
Dr.
Barnes
said
that
there
seemed
to
be
feeling
that
evacuation
plans
,
even
for
a
high
school
where
there
were
lots
of
cars
``
might
not
be
realistic
and
would
not
work
''
.
Mrs.
Molvar
asked
again
that
the
board
join
in
taking
a
stand
in
keeping
with
Jack
Lowe's
program
.
The
board
said
it
thought
it
had
gone
as
far
as
instructed
so
far
and
asked
for
more
information
to
be
brought
at
the
next
meeting
.
It
was
generally
agreed
that
the
subject
was
important
and
the
board
should
be
informed
on
what
was
done
,
is
going
to
be
done
and
what
it
thought
should
be
done
.
Salem
(
AP
)
--
The
statewide
meeting
of
war
mothers
Tuesday
in
Salem
will
hear
a
greeting
from
Gov.
Mark
Hatfield
.
Hatfield
also
is
scheduled
to
hold
a
public
United
Nations
Day
reception
in
the
state
capitol
on
Tuesday
.
His
schedule
calls
for
a
noon
speech
Monday
in
Eugene
at
the
Emerald
Empire
Kiwanis
Club
.
He
will
speak
to
Willamette
University
Young
Republicans
Thursday
night
in
Salem
.
On
Friday
he
will
go
to
Portland
for
the
swearing
in
of
Dean
Bryson
as
Multnomah
County
Circuit
Judge
.
He
will
attend
a
meeting
of
the
Republican
State
Central
Committee
Saturday
in
Portland
and
see
the
Washington-Oregon
football
game
.
Beaverton
School
District
No.
48
board
members
examined
blueprints
and
specifications
for
two
proposed
junior
high
schools
at
a
Monday
night
workshop
session
.
A
bond
issue
which
would
have
provided
some
$3.5
million
for
construction
of
the
two
900-student
schools
was
defeated
by
district
voters
in
January
.
Last
week
the
board
,
by
a
4
to
3
vote
,
decided
to
ask
voters
whether
they
prefer
the
6-3-3
(
junior
high
school
)
system
or
the
8-4
system
.
Board
members
indicated
Monday
night
this
would
be
done
by
an
advisory
poll
to
be
taken
on
Nov.
15
,
the
same
date
as
a
$581,000
bond
election
for
the
construction
of
three
new
elementary
schools
.
Secretary
of
Labor
Arthur
Goldberg
will
speak
Sunday
night
at
the
Masonic
Temple
at
a
$25-a-plate
dinner
honoring
Sen.
Wayne
L.
Morse
,
Aj
.
The
dinner
is
sponsored
by
organized
labor
and
is
scheduled
for
7
p.m.
.
Secretary
Goldberg
and
Sen.
Morse
will
hold
a
joint
press
conference
at
the
Roosevelt
Hotel
at
4:30
p.m.
Sunday
,
Blaine
Whipple
,
executive
secretary
of
the
Democratic
Party
of
Oregon
,
reported
Tuesday
.
Other
speakers
for
the
fund-raising
dinner
include
Reps.
Edith
Green
and
Al
Ullman
,
Labor
Commissioner
Norman
Nilsen
and
Mayor
Terry
Schrunk
,
all
Democrats
.
Oak
Grove
(
special
)
--
Three
positions
on
the
Oak
Lodge
Water
district
board
of
directors
have
attracted
11
candidates
.
The
election
will
be
Dec.
4
from
8
a.m.
to
8
p.m.
.
Polls
will
be
in
the
water
office
.
Incumbent
Richard
Salter
seeks
re-election
and
is
opposed
by
Donald
Huffman
for
the
five-year
term
.
Incumbent
William
Brod
is
opposed
in
his
re-election
bid
by
Barbara
Njust
,
Miles
C.
Bubenik
and
Frank
Lee
.
Five
candidates
seek
the
place
vacated
by
Secretary
Hugh
G.
Stout
.
Seeking
this
two-year
term
are
James
Culbertson
,
Dwight
M.
Steeves
,
James
C.
Piersee
,
W.M.
Sexton
and
Theodore
W.
Heitschmidt
.
A
stronger
stand
on
their
beliefs
and
a
firmer
grasp
on
their
future
were
taken
Friday
by
delegates
to
the
29th
general
council
of
the
Assemblies
of
God
,
in
session
at
the
Memorial
Coliseum
.
The
council
revised
,
in
an
effort
to
strengthen
,
the
denomination's
16
basic
beliefs
adopted
in
1966
.
The
changes
,
unanimously
adopted
,
were
felt
necessary
in
the
face
of
modern
trends
away
from
the
Bible
.
The
council
agreed
it
should
more
firmly
state
its
belief
in
and
dependence
on
the
Bible
.
At
the
adoption
,
the
Rev.
T.
F.
Zimmerman
,
general
superintendent
,
commented
,
``
The
Assemblies
of
God
has
been
a
bulwark
for
fundamentalism
in
these
modern
days
and
has
,
without
compromise
,
stood
for
the
great
truths
of
the
Bible
for
which
men
in
the
past
have
been
willing
to
give
their
lives
''
.
New
point
added
Many
changes
involved
minor
editing
and
clarification
;
;
however
,
the
first
belief
stood
for
entire
revision
with
a
new
third
point
added
to
the
list
.
The
first
of
16
beliefs
of
the
denomination
,
now
reads
:
``
The
scriptures
,
both
Old
and
New
Testament
,
are
verbally
inspired
of
God
and
are
the
revelation
of
God
to
man
,
the
infallible
,
authoritative
rule
of
faith
and
conduct
''
.
The
third
belief
,
in
six
points
,
emphasizes
the
Diety
of
the
Lord
Jesus
Christ
,
and
:
--
emphasizes
the
Virgin
birth
--
the
sinless
life
of
Christ
--
His
miracles
--
His
substitutionary
work
on
the
cross
--
His
bodily
resurrection
from
the
dead
--
and
His
exaltation
to
the
right
hand
of
God
.
Super
again
elected
Friday
afternoon
the
Rev.
T.
F.
Zimmerman
was
reelected
for
his
second
consecutive
two-year
term
as
general
superintendent
of
Assemblies
of
God
.
His
offices
are
in
Springfield
,
Mo.
.
Election
came
on
the
nominating
ballot
.
Friday
night
the
delegates
heard
the
need
for
their
forthcoming
program
,
``
Breakthrough
''
scheduled
to
fill
the
churches
for
the
next
two
years
.
In
his
opening
address
Wednesday
the
Rev.
Mr.
Zimmerman
,
urged
the
delegates
to
consider
a
10-year
expansion
program
,
with
``
Breakthrough
''
the
theme
for
the
first
two
years
.
The
Rev.
R.
L.
Brandt
,
national
secretary
of
the
home
missions
department
,
stressed
the
need
for
the
first
two
years'
work
.
``
Surveys
show
that
one
out
of
three
Americans
has
vital
contact
with
the
church
.
This
means
that
more
than
100
million
have
no
vital
touch
with
the
church
or
religious
life
''
,
he
told
delegates
Friday
.
Church
loses
pace
Talking
of
the
rapid
population
growth
(
upwards
of
12,000
babies
born
daily
)
with
an
immigrant
entering
the
United
States
every
1-1/2
minutes
,
he
said
``
our
organization
has
not
been
keeping
pace
with
this
challenge
''
.
``
In
35
years
we
have
opened
7,000
churches
''
,
the
Rev.
Mr.
Brandt
said
,
adding
that
the
denomination
had
a
national
goal
of
one
church
for
every
10,000
persons
.
``
In
this
light
we
need
1,000
churches
in
Illinois
,
where
we
have
200
;
;
800
in
Southern
New
England
,
we
have
60
;
;
we
need
100
in
Rhode
Island
,
we
have
none
''
,
he
said
.
To
step
up
the
denomination's
program
,
the
Rev.
Mr.
Brandt
suggested
the
vision
of
8,000
new
Assemblies
of
God
churches
in
the
next
10
years
.
To
accomplish
this
would
necessitate
some
changes
in
methods
,
he
said
.
'
church
meets
change
'
``
The
church's
ability
to
change
her
methods
is
going
to
determine
her
ability
to
meet
the
challenge
of
this
hour
''
.
A
capsule
view
of
proposed
plans
includes
:
--
Encouraging
by
every
means
,
all
existing
Assemblies
of
God
churches
to
start
new
churches
.
--
Engaging
mature
,
experienced
men
to
pioneer
or
open
new
churches
in
strategic
population
centers
.
--
Surrounding
pioneer
pastors
with
vocational
volunteers
(
laymen
,
who
will
be
urged
to
move
into
the
area
of
new
churches
in
the
interest
of
lending
their
support
to
the
new
project
)
.
--
Arranging
for
ministerial
graduates
to
spend
from
6-12
months
as
apprentices
in
well-established
churches
.
U.S.
Dist.
Judge
Charles
L.
Powell
denied
all
motions
made
by
defense
attorneys
Monday
in
Portland's
insurance
fraud
trial
.
Denials
were
of
motions
of
dismissal
,
continuance
,
mistrial
,
separate
trial
,
acquittal
,
striking
of
testimony
and
directed
verdict
.
In
denying
motions
for
dismissal
,
Judge
Powell
stated
that
mass
trials
have
been
upheld
as
proper
in
other
courts
and
that
``
a
person
may
join
a
conspiracy
without
knowing
who
all
of
the
conspirators
are
''
.
Attorney
Dwight
L.
Schwab
,
in
behalf
of
defendant
Philip
Weinstein
,
argued
there
is
no
evidence
linking
Weinstein
to
the
conspiracy
,
but
Judge
Powell
declared
this
is
a
matter
for
the
jury
to
decide
.
Proof
lack
charged
Schwab
also
declared
there
is
no
proof
of
Weinstein's
entering
a
conspiracy
to
use
the
U.S.
mails
to
defraud
,
to
which
federal
prosecutor
A.
Lawrence
Burbank
replied
:
``
It
is
not
necessary
that
a
defendant
actually
have
conpired
to
use
the
U.S.
mails
to
defraud
as
long
as
there
is
evidence
of
a
conspiracy
,
and
the
mails
were
then
used
to
carry
it
out
''
.
In
the
afternoon
,
defense
attorneys
began
the
presentation
of
their
cases
with
opening
statements
,
some
of
which
had
been
deferred
until
after
the
government
had
called
witnesses
and
presented
its
case
.
Miami
,
Fla.
,
March
17
--
The
Orioles
tonight
retained
the
distinction
of
being
the
only
winless
team
among
the
eighteen
Major-League
clubs
as
they
dropped
their
sixth
straight
spring
exhibition
decision
,
this
one
to
the
Kansas
City
Athletics
by
a
score
of
5
to
3
.
Indications
as
late
as
the
top
of
the
sixth
were
that
the
Birds
were
to
end
their
victory
draught
as
they
coasted
along
with
a
3-to-o
advantage
.
Siebern
hits
homer
Over
the
first
five
frames
,
Jack
Fisher
,
the
big
righthander
who
figures
to
be
in
the
middle
of
Oriole
plans
for
a
drive
on
the
1961
American
League
pennant
,
held
the
A's
scoreless
while
yielding
three
scattered
hits
.
Then
Dick
Hyde
,
submarine-ball
hurler
,
entered
the
contest
and
only
five
batters
needed
to
face
him
before
there
existed
a
3-to-3
deadlock
.
A
two-run
homer
by
Norm
Siebern
and
a
solo
blast
by
Bill
Tuttle
tied
the
game
,
and
single
runs
in
the
eighth
and
ninth
gave
the
Athletics
their
fifth
victory
in
eight
starts
.
House
throws
wild
With
one
down
in
the
eighth
,
Marv
Throneberry
drew
a
walk
and
stole
second
as
Hyde
fanned
Tuttle
.
Catcher
Frank
House's
throw
in
an
effort
to
nab
Throneberry
was
wide
and
in
the
dirt
.
Then
Heywood
Sullivan
,
Kansas
City
catcher
,
singled
up
the
middle
and
Throneberry
was
across
with
what
proved
to
be
the
winning
run
.
Rookie
southpaw
George
Stepanovich
relieved
Hyde
at
the
start
of
the
ninth
and
gave
up
the
A's
fifth
tally
on
a
walk
to
second
baseman
Dick
Howser
,
a
wild
pitch
,
and
Frank
Cipriani's
single
under
Shortstop
Jerry
Adair's
glove
into
center
.
The
Orioles
once
again
performed
at
the
plate
in
powderpuff
fashion
,
gathering
only
seven
blows
off
the
offerings
of
three
Kansas
City
pitchers
.
Three
were
doubles
,
Brooks
Robinson
getting
a
pair
and
Marv
Breeding
one
.
Hartman
impressive
Bill
Kunkel
,
Bob
Hartman
and
Ed
Keegan
did
the
mound
chores
for
the
club
down
from
West
Palm
Beach
to
play
the
game
before
767
paying
customers
in
Miami
Stadium
.
The
Birds
got
five
hits
and
all
three
of
their
runs
off
Kunkel
before
Hartman
took
over
in
the
top
of
the
fourth
.
Hartman
,
purchased
by
the
A's
from
the
Milwaukee
Braves
last
fall
,
allowed
no
hits
in
his
scoreless
three-inning
appearance
,
and
merited
the
triumph
.
Keegan
,
a
6-foot-3-inch
158-pounder
,
gave
up
the
Orioles'
last
two
safeties
over
the
final
three
frames
,
escaping
a
load
of
trouble
in
the
ninth
when
the
Birds
threatened
but
failed
to
tally
.
Robinson
doubles
again
In
the
ninth
,
Robinson
led
off
with
his
second
double
of
the
night
,
a
blast
off
the
fence
375
feet
deep
into
left
.
Whitey
Herzog
,
performing
in
right
as
the
Orioles
fielded
possibly
their
strongest
team
of
the
spring
,
worked
Keegan
for
a
base
on
balls
.
Then
three
consecutive
pinch-hitters
failed
to
produce
.
Pete
Ward
was
sent
in
for
House
and
,
after
failing
in
a
bunt
attempt
,
popped
to
Howser
on
the
grass
back
of
short
.
John
Powell
,
batting
for
Adair
,
fanned
after
fouling
off
two
2-and-2
pitches
,
and
Buddy
Barker
,
up
for
Stepanovich
,
bounced
out
sharply
to
Jerry
Lumpe
at
second
to
end
the
2-hour-and-27-minute
contest
.
The
Orioles
got
a
run
in
the
first
inning
when
Breeding
,
along
with
Robinson
,
the
two
Birds
who
got
a
pair
of
hits
,
doubled
to
right
center
,
moved
to
third
on
Russ
Snyder's
single
to
right
and
crossed
on
Kunkel's
wild
pitch
into
the
dirt
in
front
of
the
plate
.
The
Flock
added
a
pair
of
tallies
in
the
third
on
three
straight
hits
after
two
were
out
.
Jackie
Brandt
singled
deep
into
the
hole
at
short
to
start
the
rally
.
Lumpe
errs
Jim
Gentile
bounced
a
hard
shot
off
Kunkel's
glove
and
beat
it
out
for
a
single
,
and
when
Lumpe
grabbed
the
ball
and
threw
it
over
first
baseman
Throneberry's
head
Brandt
took
third
and
Gentile
second
on
the
error
.
Then
Robinson
slammed
a
long
double
to
left
center
to
score
both
runners
.
When
Robinson
tried
to
stretch
his
blow
into
a
triple
,
he
was
cut
down
in
a
close
play
at
third
,
Tuttle
to
Andy
Carey
.
The
detailed
rundown
on
the
Kansas
City
scoring
in
the
sixth
went
like
this
:
Lumpe
worked
a
walk
as
the
first
batter
to
face
Hyde
and
romped
around
as
Siebern
blasted
Hyde's
next
toss
415
feet
over
the
scoreboard
in
right
center
.
Carey
Singles
Carey
singled
on
a
slow-bouncing
ball
to
short
which
Robinson
cut
across
to
field
and
threw
wide
to
first
.
It
was
ruled
a
difficult
chance
and
a
hit
.
Then
Throneberry
rapped
into
a
fast
double
play
.
Breeding
to
Adair
to
Gentile
,
setting
up
Tuttle's
390-foot
homer
over
the
wall
in
left
center
.
If
the
Orioles
are
to
break
their
losing
streak
within
the
next
two
days
,
it
will
have
to
be
at
the
expense
of
the
American
League
champion
New
York
Yankees
,
who
come
in
here
tomorrow
for
a
night
game
and
a
single
test
Sunday
afternoon
.
Miami
,
Fla.
,
March
17
--
The
flavor
of
Baltimore's
Florida
Grapefruit
League
news
ripened
considerably
late
today
when
the
Orioles
were
advised
that
Ron
Hansen
has
fulfilled
his
obligations
under
the
Army's
military
training
program
and
is
ready
for
belated
spring
training
.
Hansen
,
who
slugged
the
1960
Oriole
high
of
22
homers
and
drove
in
86
runs
on
a
freshman
average
,
completes
the
Birds'
spring
squad
at
49
players
.
The
big
,
22-year-old
shortstop
,
the
1960
American
league
``
rookie-of-the-year
''
,
flew
here
late
this
afternoon
from
Baltimore
,
signed
his
contract
for
an
estimated
$15,000
and
was
a
spectator
at
tonight's
5-to-3
loss
to
Kansas
City
--
the
winless
Birds'
sixth
setback
in
a
row
.
15
pounds
lighter
The
6-foot
3-inch
Hansen
checked
in
close
to
200
pounds
,
15
pounds
lighter
than
his
reporting
weight
last
spring
.
He
hopes
to
melt
off
an
additional
eight
pounds
before
the
Flock
breaks
camp
three
weeks
hence
.
When
he
was
inducted
into
the
Army
at
Fort
Knox
,
Ky.
,
Hansen's
weight
had
dropped
to
180
--
``
too
light
for
me
to
be
at
my
best
''
he
said
.
``
I
feel
good
physically
''
,
Hansen
added
,
``
but
I
think
I'll
move
better
carrying
a
little
less
weight
than
I'm
carrying
now
''
.
Seeks
``
improved
fielding
''
The
rangy
,
Albany
(
Cal.
)
native
,
a
surprise
slugging
sensation
for
the
Flock
last
year
as
well
as
a
defensive
whiz
,
set
``
improved
fielding
''
as
his
1961
goal
.
``
I
think
I
can
do
a
better
job
with
the
glove
,
now
that
I
know
the
hitters
around
the
league
a
little
better
''
,
he
said
.
Hansen
will
engage
in
his
first
workout
at
Miami
Stadium
prior
to
the
opening
tomorrow
night
of
a
two-game
weekend
series
with
the
New
York
Yankees
.
Skinny
Brown
and
Hoyt
Wilhelm
,
the
Flock's
veteran
knuckleball
specialists
,
are
slated
to
oppose
the
American
League
champions
in
tomorrow's
8
P.M.
contest
.
Duren
,
Sheldon
on
hill
Ryne
Duren
and
Roland
Sheldon
,
a
rookie
righthander
who
posted
a
15-1
record
last
year
for
the
Yanks'
Auburn
(
N.Y.
)
farm
club
of
the
Class-D
New
York-Pennsylvania
League
,
are
the
probable
rival
pitchers
.
Twenty-one-year-old
Milt
Pappas
and
Jerry
Walker
,
22
,
are
scheduled
to
share
the
Oriole
mound
chores
against
the
Bombers'
Art
Ditmar
in
Sunday's
2
P.M.
encounter
.
Ralph
Houk
,
successor
to
Casey
Stengel
at
the
Yankee
helm
,
plans
to
bring
the
entire
New
York
squad
here
from
St.
Petersburg
,
including
Joe
Dimaggio
and
large
crowds
are
anticipated
for
both
weekend
games
.
The
famed
Yankee
Clipper
,
now
retired
,
has
been
assisting
as
a
batting
coach
.
Squad
cut
near
Pitcher
Steve
Barber
joined
the
club
one
week
ago
after
completing
his
hitch
under
the
Army's
accelerated
wintertime
military
course
,
also
at
Fort
Knox
,
Ky.
.
The
22-year-old
southpaw
enlisted
earlier
last
fall
than
did
Hansen
.
Baltimore's
bulky
spring-training
contingent
now
gradually
will
be
reduced
as
Manager
Paul
Richards
and
his
coaches
seek
to
trim
it
down
to
a
more
streamlined
and
workable
unit
.
``
Take
a
ride
on
this
one
''
,
Brooks
Robinson
greeted
Hansen
as
the
Bird
third
sacker
grabbed
a
bat
,
headed
for
the
plate
and
bounced
a
third-inning
two-run
double
off
the
left-centerfield
wall
tonight
.
It
was
the
first
of
two
doubles
by
Robinson
,
who
was
in
a
mood
to
celebrate
.
Just
before
game
time
,
Robinson's
pretty
wife
,
Connie
informed
him
that
an
addition
to
the
family
can
be
expected
late
next
summer
.
Unfortunately
,
Brooks's
teammates
were
not
in
such
festive
mood
as
the
Orioles
expired
before
the
seven-hit
pitching
of
three
Kansas
City
rookie
hurlers
.
Hansen
arrived
just
before
nightfall
,
two
hours
late
,
in
company
with
Lee
MacPhail
;
;
J.
A.
W.
Iglehart
,
chairman
of
the
Oriole
board
of
directors
,
and
Public
Relations
Director
Jack
Dunn
.
Their
flight
was
delayed
,
Dunn
said
,
when
a
boarding
ramp
inflicted
some
minor
damage
to
the
wing
of
the
plane
.
Ex-Oriole
Clint
Courtney
,
now
catching
for
the
A's
is
all
for
the
American
League's
1961
expansion
to
the
West
Coast
.
``
But
they
shouldda
brought
in
Tokyo
,
too
''
,
added
Old
Scrapiron
.
``
Then
we'd
really
have
someplace
to
go
''
.
Bowie
,
Md.
,
March
17
--
Gaining
her
second
straight
victory
,
Norman
B.
,
Small
,
Jr.'s
Garden
Fresh
,
a
3-year-old
filly
,
downed
promising
colts
in
the
$4,500
St.
Patrick's
Day
Purse
,
featured
seventh
race
here
today
,
and
paid
$7.20
straight
.
Toying
with
her
field
in
the
early
stages
,
Garden
Fresh
was
asked
for
top
speed
only
in
the
stretch
by
Jockey
Philip
Grimm
and
won
by
a
length
and
a
half
in
1.24
3-5
for
the
7
furlongs
.
8,280
attend
races
Richard
M.
Forbes's
Paget
,
which
had
what
seemed
to
be
a
substantial
lead
in
the
early
stages
,
tired
rapidly
nearing
the
wire
and
was
able
to
save
place
money
only
a
head
in
front
of
Glen
T.
Hallowell's
Milties
Miss
.
A
bright
sun
and
brisk
wind
had
the
track
in
a
fast
condition
for
the
first
time
this
week
and
8,280
St.
Patty
Day
celebrants
bet
$842,617
on
the
well-prepared
program
.
Prior
to
the
featured
race
,
the
stewards
announced
that
apprentice
James
P.
Verrone
is
suspended
ten
days
for
crowding
horses
and
crossing
the
field
sharply
in
two
races
on
Wednesday
.
Culmone
gets
first
win
Garden
Fresh
,
the
result
of
a
mating
of
Better
Self
and
Rosy
Fingered
,
seems
to
improve
with
each
start
and
appeared
to
win
the
St.
Patrick's
Day
Purse
with
some
speed
in
reserve
.
She
was
moving
up
to
the
allowance
department
after
winning
a
$10,000
claiming
event
.
Cleveland
,
March
17
(
AP
)
--
George
Kerr
,
the
swift-striding
Jamaican
,
set
a
meet
record
in
the
600-yard
run
in
the
Knights
of
Columbus
track
meet
tonight
,
beating
Purdue's
Dave
Mills
in
a
hot
duel
in
1.10.1
.
Kerr
,
who
set
the
world
record
earlier
this
month
in
New
York
with
a
clocking
of
1.09.3
,
wiped
out
Mills's
early
pace
and
beat
the
young
Big
10
quarter-mile
king
by
5
yards
.
Both
were
under
the
meet
mark
of
1.10.8
set
in
1950
by
Mal
Whitfield
.
Mills
shot
out
in
front
and
kept
the
lead
through
two
thirds
of
the
race
.
Then
Kerr
,
a
graduate
student
from
Illinois
,
moved
past
him
on
a
straightaway
and
held
off
Mills's
challenge
on
the
final
turn
.
Mills
was
timed
in
1.10.4
.
The
crowd
at
the
twenty-first
annual
K.
of
C.
Games
,
final
indoor
meet
of
the
season
,
got
a
thrill
a
few
minutes
earlier
when
a
slender
,
bespectacled
woman
broke
the
one-week-old
world
record
in
the
half-mile
run
.
Mrs.
Grace
Butcher
,
of
nearby
Chardon
,
a
27-year-old
housewife
who
has
two
children
,
finished
in
2.21.6
.
She
snapped
five
tenths
of
a
second
off
the
mark
set
by
Helen
Shipley
,
of
Wellsley
College
,
in
the
National
A.A.U.
meet
in
Columbus
,
Ohio
.
San
Francisco
,
March
17
(
AP
)
--
Bobby
Waters
of
Sylvania
,
Ga.
,
relief
quarterback
for
the
San
Francisco
49ers
of
the
National
Football
League
,
will
undergo
a
knee
operation
tomorrow
at
Franklin
Hospital
here
.
Waters
injured
his
left
knee
in
the
last
game
of
the
1960
season
.
While
working
out
in
Sylvania
a
swelling
developed
in
the
knee
and
he
came
here
to
consult
the
team
physician
.
St.
Petersburg
,
Fla.
,
March
17
(
AP
)
--
Two
errors
by
New
York
Yankee
shortstop
Tony
Kubek
in
the
eleventh
inning
donated
four
unearned
runs
and
a
5-to-2
victory
to
the
Chicago
White
Sox
today
.
Austin
,
Texas
--
A
Texas
halfback
who
doesn't
even
know
the
team's
plays
,
Eldon
Moritz
,
ranks
fourth
in
Southwest
Conference
scoring
after
three
games
.
Time
stands
still
every
time
Moritz
,
a
26-year-old
Army
Signal
Corps
veteran
,
goes
into
the
field
.
Although
he
never
gets
to
play
while
the
clock
is
running
,
he
gets
a
big
kick
--
several
every
Saturday
,
in
fact
--
out
of
football
.
Moritz
doesn't
even
have
a
nose
guard
or
hip
pads
but
he's
one
of
the
most
valuable
members
of
the
Longhorn
team
that
will
be
heavily
favored
Saturday
over
Oklahoma
in
the
Cotton
Bowl
.
That's
because
he
already
has
kicked
14
extra
points
in
15
tries
.
He
ran
his
string
of
successful
conversions
this
season
to
13
straight
before
one
went
astray
last
Saturday
night
in
the
41-8
slaughter
of
Washington
State
.
Moritz
is
listed
on
the
Longhorn
roster
as
a
right
halfback
,
the
position
at
which
he
lettered
on
the
1956
team
.
But
ask
coach
Darrell
Royal
what
position
he
plays
and
you'll
get
the
quick
response
,
``
place-kicker
''
.
A
208-pound
,
6-foot
1-inch
senior
from
Stamford
,
Moritz
practices
nothing
but
place-kicking
.
Last
year
,
when
he
worked
out
at
halfback
all
season
,
he
didn't
get
into
a
single
game
.
``
This
year
,
coach
Royal
told
me
if
I'd
work
on
my
place-kicking
he
thought
he
could
use
me
''
,
said
Moritz
.
``
So
I
started
practicing
on
it
in
spring
training
.
Moritz
was
bothered
during
the
first
two
games
this
year
by
a
pulled
muscle
in
the
thigh
of
his
right
(
kicking
)
leg
and
,
as
a
result
,
several
of
his
successful
conversions
have
gone
barely
far
enough
.
Moritz
said
Monday
his
leg
feels
fine
and
,
as
a
result
,
he
hopes
to
start
practicing
field
goals
this
week
.
He
kicked
several
while
playing
at
Stamford
High
School
,
including
one
that
beat
Anson
,
3-0
,
in
a
1953
district
game
.
``
I
kicked
about
110
extra
points
in
135
tries
during
three
years
in
high
school
''
,
he
said
,
``
and
made
26
in
a
row
at
one
time
.
I
never
did
miss
one
in
a
playoff
game
--
I
kicked
about
20
in
the
five
playoff
games
my
last
two
years
''
.
Moritz
came
to
Texas
in
1954
but
his
freshman
football
efforts
were
hampered
by
a
knee
injury
.
He
missed
the
1955
season
because
of
an
operation
on
the
ailing
knee
,
then
played
77
minutes
in
1956
.
His
statistical
record
that
year
,
when
Texas
won
only
one
game
and
lost
nine
,
was
far
from
impressive
:
he
carried
the
ball
three
times
for
a
net
gain
of
10
yards
,
punted
once
for
39
yards
and
caught
one
pass
for
13
yards
.
He
went
into
the
Army
in
March
,
1957
,
and
returned
two
years
later
.
But
he
was
scholastically
ineligible
in
1959
and
merely
present
last
season
.
Place
kicking
is
largely
a
matter
of
timing
,
Moritz
declared
.
``
Once
you
get
the
feel
of
it
,
there's
not
much
to
it
.
I've
tried
to
teach
some
of
the
other
boys
to
kick
and
some
of
them
can't
seem
to
get
the
feel
.
Practice
helps
you
to
get
your
timing
down
.
``
It's
kind
of
like
golf
--
if
you
don't
swing
a
club
very
often
,
your
timing
gets
off
''
.
Moritz
,
however
,
kicks
only
about
10
or
12
extra
points
during
each
practice
session
.
``
If
you
kick
too
much
,
your
leg
gets
kinda
dead
''
,
he
explained
.
Footnotes
:
In
their
first
three
games
,
the
Longhorns
have
had
the
ball
41
times
and
scored
16
times
,
or
40
per
cent
;
;
their
total
passing
yardage
in
three
games
,
447
on
30
completions
in
56
attempts
,
is
only
22
yards
short
of
their
total
passing
yardage
in
1959
,
when
they
made
469
on
37
completions
in
86
tries
.
Tailback
James
Saxton
already
has
surpassed
his
rushing
total
for
his
brilliant
sophomore
season
,
when
he
netted
271
yards
on
55
carries
;
;
he
now
has
273
yards
in
22
tries
during
three
games
.
Saxton
has
made
only
one
second-half
appearance
this
season
and
that
was
in
the
Washington
State
game
,
for
four
plays
:
he
returned
the
kickoff
30
yards
,
gained
five
yards
through
the
line
and
then
uncorked
a
56-yard
touchdown
run
before
retiring
to
the
bench
.
Wingback
Jack
Collins
injured
a
knee
in
the
Washington
State
game
but
insists
he'll
be
ready
for
Oklahoma
.
Last
week
,
when
Royal
was
informed
that
three
Longhorns
were
among
the
conference's
top
four
in
rushing
,
he
said
:
``
That
won't
last
long
''
.
It
didn't
;
;
Monday
,
he
had
four
Longhorns
in
the
top
four
.
A
good
feeling
prevailed
on
the
SMU
coaching
staff
Monday
,
but
attention
quickly
turned
from
Saturday's
victory
to
next
week's
problem
:
Rice
University
.
The
Mustangs
don't
play
this
week
.
``
We're
just
real
happy
for
the
players
''
,
Coach
Bill
Meek
said
of
the
9-7
victory
over
the
Air
Force
Academy
.
``
I
think
the
big
thing
about
the
game
was
that
our
kids
for
the
third
straight
week
stayed
in
there
pitching
and
kept
the
pressure
on
.
It
was
the
first
time
we've
been
ahead
this
season
(
when
John
Richey
kicked
what
proved
to
be
the
winning
field
goal
)
''
.
Assistant
coach
John
Cudmore
described
victory
as
``
a
good
feeling
,
I
think
,
on
the
part
of
the
coaches
and
the
players
.
We
needed
it
and
we
got
it
''
.
Meek
expressed
particular
gratification
at
the
defensive
performances
of
end
Happy
Nelson
and
halfback
Billy
Gannon
.
Both
turned
in
top
jobs
for
the
second
straight
game
.
``
Nelson
played
magnificent
football
''
,
Meek
praised
.
``
He
knocked
down
the
interference
and
made
key
stops
lots
of
times
.
And
he
caused
the
fumble
that
set
up
our
touchdown
.
He
broke
that
boy
(
Air
Force
fullback
Nick
Arshinkoff
)
in
two
and
knocked
him
loose
from
the
football
''
.
Gannon
contributed
saving
plays
on
the
Falcons'
aerial
thrusts
in
the
late
stages
.
One
was
on
a
fourth-down
screen
pass
from
the
Mustang
21
after
an
incomplete
pass
into
Gannon's
territory
.
``
As
soon
as
it
started
to
form
,
Gannon
spotted
it
''
,
Meek
said
.
``
He
timed
it
just
right
and
broke
through
there
before
the
boy
(
halfback
Terry
Isaacson
)
had
time
to
turn
around
.
He
really
crucified
him
he
nailed
it
for
a
yard
loss
''
.
The
Air
Force's
,
and
the
game's
,
final
play
,
was
a
long
pass
by
quarterback
Bob
McNaughton
which
Gannon
intercepted
on
his
own
44
and
returned
22
yards
.
``
He
just
lay
back
there
and
waited
for
it
''
,
Meek
said
.
``
He
almost
brought
it
back
all
the
way
''
.
Except
for
sophomore
center
Mike
Kelsey
and
fullback
Mike
Rice
,
Meek
expects
the
squad
to
be
physically
sound
for
Rice
.
``
Kelsey
is
very
doubtful
for
the
Rice
game
''
,
Meek
said
.
``
He'll
be
out
of
action
all
this
week
.
He
got
hit
from
the
blind
side
by
the
split
end
coming
back
on
the
second
play
of
the
game
.
There
is
definitely
some
ligament
damage
in
his
knee
''
.
Rice
has
not
played
since
injuring
a
knee
in
the
opener
with
Maryland
.
``
He's
looking
a
lot
better
,
and
he's
able
to
run
''
,
Meek
explained
.
``
We'll
let
him
do
a
lot
of
running
this
week
,
but
I
don't
know
if
he'll
be
able
to
play
''
.
The
game
players
saw
the
Air
Force
film
Monday
,
ran
for
30
minutes
,
then
went
in
,
while
the
reserves
scrimmaged
for
45
minutes
.
``
We'll
work
hard
Tuesday
,
Wednesday
and
Thursday
''
,
Meek
said
,
``
and
probably
will
have
a
good
scrimmage
Friday
.
We'll
work
out
about
an
hour
on
Saturday
,
then
we'll
work
Monday
and
Tuesday
of
next
week
,
then
taper
off
''
.
SMU
will
play
the
Owls
at
Rice
Stadium
in
Houston
in
a
night
game
Saturday
,
Oct.
21
.
Huddle
hearsay
--
Held
out
of
Texas
Tech's
sweat-suits
drill
Monday
at
Lubbock
was
tackle
Richard
Stafford
,
who
is
undergoing
treatment
for
a
leg
injury
suffered
in
the
Raiders'
38-7
loss
to
Texas
A
&
M
Because
of
its
important
game
with
Arkansas
coming
up
Saturday
,
Baylor
worked
out
in
the
rain
Monday
--
mud
or
no
mud
.
End
Gene
Raesz
,
who
broke
a
hand
in
the
Owl's
game
with
LSU
,
was
back
working
out
with
Rice
Monday
,
and
John
Nichols
,
sophomore
guard
,
moved
back
into
action
after
a
week's
idleness
with
an
ankle
injury
.
The
Texas
Aggies
got
a
day
off
Monday
--
a
special
gift
from
Coach
Jim
Myers
for
its
conference
victory
last
Saturday
night
,
but
Myers
announced
that
halfback
George
Hargett
,
shaken
up
in
the
Tech
game
,
would
not
play
against
Trinity
Saturday
.
Halfback
Bud
Priddy
,
slowed
for
almost
a
month
by
a
slowly-mending
sprained
ankle
,
joined
TCU's
workout
Monday
.
The
Dallas
Texans
were
back
home
Monday
with
their
third
victory
in
four
American
Football
League
starts
--
a
19-12
triumph
over
the
Denver
Broncos
--
but
their
visit
will
be
a
short
one
.
The
Texans
have
two
more
road
games
--
at
Buffalo
and
Houston
--
before
they
play
for
the
home
folks
again
,
and
it
looks
as
if
coach
Hank
Stram's
men
will
meet
the
Bills
just
as
they
are
developing
into
the
kind
of
team
they
were
expected
to
be
in
pre-season
reckonings
.
Buffalo
coach
Buster
Ramsey
,
who
has
become
one
of
the
game's
greatest
collectors
of
quarterbacks
,
apparently
now
has
found
a
productive
pair
in
two
ex-National
Football
Leaguers
,
M.
C.
Reynolds
and
Warren
Rabb
.
Rabb
,
the
former
Louisiana
State
field
general
,
came
off
the
bench
for
his
debut
with
the
Bills
Sunday
and
directed
his
new
team
to
a
22-12
upset
victory
over
the
Houston
Oilers
,
defending
league
champions
.
``
Just
our
luck
''
!
!
Exclaimed
Stram
.
``
Buster
would
solve
that
quarterback
problem
just
as
we
head
that
way
''
.
Ramsey
has
a
thing
or
two
to
mutter
about
himself
,
for
the
Dallas
defensive
unit
turned
in
another
splendid
effort
against
Denver
,
and
the
Texans
were
able
to
whip
the
dangerous
Broncs
without
the
fullbacking
of
a
top
star
,
Jack
Spikes
,
though
he
did
the
team's
place-kicking
while
nursing
a
knee
injury
.
``
Our
interior
line
and
out
linebackers
played
exceptionally
well
''
,
said
Stram
Monday
after
he
and
his
staff
reviewed
movies
of
the
game
.
``
In
fact
our
whole
defensive
unit
did
a
good
job
''
.
The
Texans
won
the
game
through
ball
control
,
with
Quarterback
Cotton
Davidson
throwing
only
17
passes
.
``
We
always
like
to
keep
the
ball
as
much
as
we
can
against
Denver
because
they
have
such
an
explosive
attack
''
,
explained
Stram
.
``
They
can
be
going
along
,
doing
little
damage
,
then
bang
,
bang
--
they
can
hit
a
couple
of
passes
on
you
for
touchdowns
and
put
you
in
trouble
''
.
The
Broncs
did
hit
two
quick
strikes
in
the
final
period
against
the
Texans
,
but
Dallas
had
enough
of
a
lead
to
hold
them
off
.
The
principal
tactic
in
controlling
the
ball
was
giving
it
to
Abner
Haynes
,
the
flashy
halfback
.
He
was
called
upon
26
times
--
more
than
all
of
the
other
ball-carriers
combined
--
and
delivered
145
yards
.
The
Texans
made
themselves
a
comforting
break
on
the
opening
kickoff
when
Denver's
Al
Carmichael
was
jarred
loose
from
the
ball
when
Dave
Grayson
,
the
speedy
halfback
,
hit
him
and
Guard
Al
Reynolds
claimed
it
for
Dallas
.
A
quick
touchdown
resulted
.
``
That
permitted
us
to
start
controlling
the
ball
right
away
''
,
said
Stram
,
quipping
,
``
I
think
I'll
put
that
play
in
the
book
''
.
The
early
Southwest
Conference
football
leaders
--
Texas
,
Arkansas
and
Texas
A
&
M
--
made
a
big
dent
in
the
statistics
last
week
.
Texas'
545-yard
spree
against
Washington
State
gave
the
Longhorns
a
3-game
total
offense
of
1,512
yards
(
1,065
rushing
and
447
passing
)
a
new
SWC
high
.
Arkansas
combined
280
yards
rushing
with
64
yards
passing
(
on
5
completions
in
7
tosses
)
and
a
tough
defense
to
whip
TCU
,
and
A
&
M
,
with
a
38-point
bulge
against
Texas
Tech
ran
up
its
biggest
total
loop
play
since
1950
.
Completing
12
of
15
passes
for
174
yards
,
the
Aggies
had
a
total
offense
of
361
yards
.
Texas
leads
in
per-game
rushing
averages
,
355
yards
,
and
passing
149
(
to
Baylor's
126
)
,
but
idle
Baylor
has
the
best
defensive
record
(
187.5
yards
per
game
to
Texas'
189
)
.
A
&
M
has
the
best
defense
against
passes
,
34.7
yards
per
game
.
Not
satisfied
with
various
unofficial
checks
on
the
liveliness
of
baseballs
currently
in
use
,
the
major
leagues
have
ordered
their
own
tests
,
which
are
in
progress
at
Massachusetts
Institute
of
Technology
.
Rookie
Ron
Nischwitz
continued
his
pinpoint
pitching
Monday
night
as
the
Bears
made
it
two
straight
over
Indianapolis
,
5-3
.
The
husky
6-3
,
205-pound
lefthander
,
was
in
command
all
the
way
before
an
on-the-scene
audience
of
only
949
and
countless
of
television
viewers
in
the
Denver
area
.
It
was
Nischwitz'
third
straight
victory
of
the
new
season
and
ran
the
Grizzlies'
winning
streak
to
four
straight
.
They
now
lead
Louisville
by
a
full
game
on
top
of
the
American
Association
pack
.
Nischwitz
fanned
six
and
walked
only
Charley
Hinton
in
the
third
inning
.
He
has
given
only
the
one
pass
in
his
27
innings
,
an
unusual
characteristic
for
a
southpaw
.
The
Bears
took
the
lead
in
the
first
inning
,
as
they
did
in
Sunday's
opener
,
and
never
lagged
.
Dick
McAuliffe
cracked
the
first
of
his
two
doubles
against
Lefty
Don
Rudolph
to
open
the
Bear's
attack
.
After
Al
Paschal
gruonded
out
,
Jay
Cooke
walked
and
Jim
McDaniel
singled
home
McAuliffe
.
Alusik
then
moved
Cooke
across
with
a
line
drive
to
left
.
Jay
Porter
drew
a
base
on
balls
to
fill
the
bases
but
Don
Wert's
smash
was
knocked
down
by
Rudolph
for
the
putout
.
The
Bears
added
two
more
in
the
fifth
when
McAuliffe
dropped
a
double
into
the
leftfield
corner
,
Paschal
doubled
down
the
rightfield
line
and
Cooke
singled
off
Phil
Shartzer's
glove
.
Nischwitz
was
working
on
a
3-hitter
when
the
Indians
bunched
three
of
their
eight
hits
for
two
runs
in
the
sixth
.
Chuck
Hinton
tripled
to
the
rightfield
corner
,
Cliff
Cook
and
Dan
Pavletich
singled
and
Gaines'
infield
roller
accounted
for
the
tallies
.
The
Bears
added
their
last
run
in
the
sixth
on
Alusik's
double
and
outfield
flies
by
Porter
and
Wert
.
Gaines
hammered
the
ball
over
the
left
fence
for
the
third
Indianapolis
run
in
the
ninth
.
Despite
the
45-degree
weather
the
game
was
clicked
off
in
1:48
,
thanks
to
only
three
bases
on
balls
and
some
good
infield
play
.
Chico
Ruiz
made
a
spectacular
play
on
Alusik's
grounder
in
the
hole
in
the
fourth
and
Wert
came
up
with
some
good
stops
and
showed
a
strong
arm
at
third
base
.
Bingles
and
bobbles
:
Cliff
Cook
accounted
for
three
of
the
Tribe's
eight
hits
.
It
was
the
season's
first
night
game
and
an
obvious
refocusing
of
the
lights
are
in
order
.
The
infield
was
well
flooded
but
the
expanded
outfield
was
much
too
dark
.
Mary
Dobbs
Tuttle
was
back
at
the
organ
.
Among
the
spectators
was
the
noted
exotic
dancer
,
Patti
Waggin
who
is
Mrs.
Don
Rudolph
when
off
the
stage
.
Lefty
Wyman
Carey
,
another
Denver
rookie
,
will
be
on
the
mound
against
veteran
John
Tsitouris
at
8
o'clock
Tuesday
night
.
Ed
Donnelly
is
still
bothered
by
a
side
injury
and
will
miss
his
starting
turn
.
Dallas
,
Tex.
,
May
1
--
(
AP
)
--
Kenny
Lane
of
Muskegon
,
Mich.
,
world's
seventh
ranked
lightweight
,
had
little
trouble
in
taking
a
unanimous
decision
over
Rip
Randall
of
Tyler
,
Tex.
,
here
Monday
night
.
St.
Paul-Minneapolis
,
May
1
--
(
AP
)
--
Billy
Gardner's
line
double
,
which
just
eluded
the
diving
Minnie
Minoso
in
left
field
,
drove
in
Jim
Lemon
with
the
winning
run
with
two
out
in
the
last
of
the
ninth
to
give
the
Minnesota
Twins
a
6-5
victory
over
the
Chicago
White
Sox
Monday
.
Lemon
was
on
with
his
fourth
single
of
the
game
,
a
liner
to
center
.
He
came
all
the
way
around
on
Gardner's
hit
before
5777
fans
.
It
was
Gardner's
second
run
batted
in
of
the
game
and
his
only
ones
of
the
year
.
Turk
Lown
was
tagged
with
the
loss
,
his
second
against
no
victories
,
while
Ray
Moore
won
his
second
game
against
a
single
loss
.
The
Twins
tied
the
score
in
the
sixth
inning
when
Reno
Bertoia
beat
out
a
high
chopper
to
third
base
and
scored
on
Lenny
Green's
double
to
left
.
The
White
Sox
had
taken
a
5-4
lead
in
the
top
of
the
sixth
on
a
pair
of
pop
fly
hits
--
a
triple
by
Roy
Sievers
and
single
by
Camilo
Carreon
--
a
walk
and
a
sacrifice
fly
.
Jim
Landis'
380-foot
home
run
over
left
in
the
first
inning
gave
the
Sox
a
1-0
lead
,
but
Harmon
Killebrew
came
back
in
the
bottom
of
the
first
with
his
second
homer
in
two
days
with
the
walking
Bob
Allison
aboard
.
Al
Smith's
340-blast
over
left
in
the
fourth
--
his
fourth
homer
of
the
campaign
--
tied
the
score
and
Carreon's
first
major
league
home
run
in
the
fifth
put
the
Sox
back
in
front
.
A
double
by
Green
,
Allison's
run-scoring
2-baser
,
an
infield
single
by
Lemon
and
Gardner's
solid
single
to
center
put
the
Twins
back
in
front
in
the
last
of
the
fifth
.
Ogden
,
Utah
,
May
1
--
(
AP
)
--
Boston
Red
Sox
Outfielder
Jackie
Jensen
said
Monday
night
he
was
through
playing
baseball
.
``
I've
had
it
''
,
he
told
a
newsman
.
``
I
know
when
my
reflexes
are
gone
and
I'm
not
going
to
be
any
25th
man
on
the
ball
club
''
.
This
was
the
first
word
from
Jensen
on
his
sudden
walkout
.
Jensen
got
only
six
hits
in
46
at-bats
for
a
batting
average
in
the
first
12
games
.
He
took
a
midnight
train
out
of
Cleveland
Saturday
,
without
an
official
word
to
anybody
,
and
has
stayed
away
from
newsmen
on
his
train
trip
across
the
nation
to
Reno
,
Nev.
,
where
his
wife
,
former
Olympic
Diving
Champion
Zoe
Ann
Olsen
,
awaited
.
She
said
,
when
she
learned
Jackie
was
heading
home
:
``
I'm
just
speculating
,
but
I
have
to
think
Jack
feels
he's
hurting
Boston's
chances
''
.
The
Union
Pacific
Railroad
streamliner
,
City
of
San
Francisco
,
stopped
in
Ogden
,
Utah
,
for
a
few
minutes
.
Sports
Writer
Ensign
Ritchie
of
the
Ogden
Standard
Examiner
went
to
his
compartment
to
talk
with
him
.
The
conductor
said
to
Ritchie
:
``
I
don't
think
you
want
to
talk
to
him
.
You'll
probably
get
a
ball
bat
on
the
head
.
He's
mad
at
the
world
''
.
But
Jackie
had
gone
into
the
station
.
Ritchie
walked
up
to
him
at
the
magazine
stand
.
``
I
told
him
who
I
was
and
he
was
quite
cold
.
But
he
warmed
up
after
a
while
.
I
told
him
what
Liston
had
said
and
he
said
Liston
was
a
double-crosser
and
said
anything
he
(
Liston
)
got
was
through
a
keyhole
.
He
said
he
had
never
talked
to
Liston
''
.
Liston
is
Bill
Liston
,
baseball
writer
for
the
Boston
Traveler
,
who
quoted
Jensen
as
saying
:
``
I
can't
hit
anymore
.
I
can't
run
.
I
can't
throw
.
Suddenly
my
reflexes
are
gone
.
Just
when
it
seems
baseball
might
be
losing
its
grip
on
the
masses
up
pops
heroics
to
start
millions
of
tongues
to
wagging
.
And
so
it
was
over
the
weekend
what
with
40-year-old
Warren
Spahn
pitching
his
no-hit
masterpiece
against
the
Giants
and
the
Giants'
Willie
Mays
retaliating
with
a
record-tying
4-homer
spree
Sunday
.
Both
,
of
course
,
were
remarkable
feats
and
further
embossed
the
fact
that
baseball
rightfully
is
the
national
pastime
.
Of
the
two
cherished
achievements
the
elderly
Spahn's
hitless
pitching
probably
reached
the
most
hearts
.
It
was
a
real
stimulant
to
a
lot
of
guys
I
know
who
have
moved
past
the
2-score-year
milestone
.
And
one
of
the
Milwaukee
rookies
sighed
and
remarked
,
``
Wish
I
was
40
,
and
a
top-grade
big
leaguer
.
The
modest
and
happy
Spahn
waved
off
his
new
laurels
as
one
of
those
good
days
.
But
there
surely
can
be
no
doubt
about
the
slender
southpaw
belonging
with
the
all-time
great
lefthanders
in
the
game's
history
.
Yes
,
with
Bob
Grove
,
Carl
Hubbell
,
Herb
Pennock
,
Art
Nehf
,
Vernon
Gomez
,
et
al
.
Spahn
not
only
is
a
superior
pitcher
but
a
gentlemanly
fine
fellow
,
a
ball
player's
ball
player
,
as
they
say
in
the
trade
.
I
remember
his
beardown
performance
in
a
meaningless
exhibition
game
at
Bears
Stadium
Oct.
14
,
1951
,
before
a
new
record
crowd
for
the
period
of
18,792
.
``
Spahnie
doesn't
know
how
to
merely
go
through
the
motions
''
,
remarked
Enos
Slaughter
,
another
all-out
guy
,
who
played
rightfield
that
day
and
popped
one
over
the
clubhouse
.
The
spectacular
Mays
,
who
reaches
a
decade
in
the
big
leagues
come
May
25
,
joined
six
other
sluggers
who
walloped
four
home
runs
in
a
span
of
nine
innings
.
Incidentally
,
only
two
did
it
before
a
home
audience
.
Bobby
Lowe
of
Boston
was
the
first
to
hit
four
at
home
and
Gil
Hodges
turned
the
trick
in
Brooklyn's
Ebbetts
Field
.
Ed
Delahanty
and
Chuck
Klein
of
the
Phillies
,
the
Braves'
Joe
Adcock
,
Lou
Gehrig
of
the
Yankees
,
Pat
Seerey
of
the
White
Sox
and
Rocky
Colavito
,
then
with
Cleveland
,
made
their
history
on
the
road
.
Willie's
big
day
revived
the
running
argument
about
the
relative
merits
of
Mays
and
Mickey
Mantle
.
This
is
an
issue
which
boils
down
to
a
matter
of
opinion
,
depending
on
whether
you're
an
American
or
National
fan
and
anti
or
pro-Yankee
.
The
record
books
,
however
,
would
favor
the
Giants'
ace
.
In
four
of
his
nine
previous
seasons
Mays
hit
as
many
as
25
home
runs
and
stole
as
many
as
25
bases
.
Once
the
figure
was
30-30
.
Willie's
lifetime
batting
average
of
is
11
points
beyond
Mickey's
.
The
Giants
who
had
been
anemic
with
the
bat
in
their
windy
Candlestick
Park
suddenly
found
the
formula
in
Milwaukee's
park
.
It
will
forever
be
a
baseball
mystery
how
a
team
will
suddenly
start
hitting
after
a
distressing
slump
.
The
Denver-area
TV
audience
was
privileged
to
see
Mays'
four
home
runs
,
thanks
to
a
new
arrangement
made
by
Bob
Howsam
that
the
games
are
not
to
be
blacked
out
when
his
Bears
are
playing
at
home
.
This
rule
providing
for
a
blackout
of
televised
baseball
30
minutes
before
the
start
of
a
major
or
minor
league
game
in
any
area
comes
from
the
game's
top
rulers
.
The
last
couple
of
years
the
Bears
management
got
the
business
from
the
``
Living
Room
Athletic
Club
''
when
games
were
cut
off
.
Actually
they
were
helpless
to
do
anything
about
the
nationwide
policy
.
This
year
,
I
am
told
,
the
CBS
network
will
continue
to
abide
by
the
rule
but
NBC
will
play
to
a
conclusion
here
.
There
are
two
more
Sunday
afternoons
when
the
situation
will
arise
.
It
is
an
irritable
rule
that
does
baseball
more
harm
than
good
,
especially
at
the
minor
league
level
.
You
would
be
surprised
how
many
fans
purposely
stayed
away
from
Bears
Stadium
last
year
because
of
the
television
policy
.
This
dissatisfaction
led
to
Howsam's
request
that
the
video
not
be
terminated
before
the
end
of
the
game
.
Cincinnati
,
Ohio
(
AP
)
--
The
powerful
New
York
Yankees
won
their
19th
world
series
in
a
5-game
romp
over
outclassed
Cincinnati
,
crushing
the
Reds
in
a
humiliating
13-5
barrage
Monday
in
the
loosely
played
finale
.
With
Mickey
Mantle
and
Yogi
Berra
both
out
of
action
due
to
injuries
,
the
American
League
champs
still
mounted
a
15-hit
attack
against
a
parade
of
eight
Cincinnati
pitchers
,
the
most
ever
used
by
one
team
in
a
series
game
.
Johnny
Blanchard
,
Mantle's
replacement
,
slammed
a
2-run
homer
as
the
Yankees
routed
loser
Joey
Jay
in
a
5-run
first
inning
.
Hector
Lopez
,
subbing
for
Berra
,
smashed
a
3-run
homer
off
Bill
Henry
during
another
5-run
explosion
in
the
fourth
.
The
Yanks
also
took
advantage
of
three
Cincinnati
errors
.
The
crowd
of
32,589
had
only
two
chances
to
applaud
.
In
the
third
Frank
Robinson
hammered
a
long
home
run
deep
into
the
corner
of
the
bleachers
in
right
center
,
about
400
feet
away
,
with
two
men
on
.
Momentarily
the
Reds
were
back
in
the
ball
game
,
trailing
only
6-3
,
but
the
drive
fizzled
when
John
Edwards
fouled
out
with
men
on
second
and
third
and
two
out
.
In
the
fifth
,
Wally
Post
slashed
a
2-run
homer
off
Bud
Daley
,
but
by
that
time
the
score
was
11-5
and
it
really
didn't
matter
.
The
Yankee
triumph
made
Ralph
Houk
only
the
third
man
to
lead
a
team
to
both
a
pennant
and
a
World
Series
victory
in
his
first
year
as
a
manager
.
Only
Bucky
Harris
,
the
``
boy-manager
''
of
Washington
in
1924
,
and
Eddie
Dyer
of
the
St.
Louis
Cardinals
in
1946
had
accomplished
the
feat
.
Philadelphia
,
Jan.
23
--
Nick
Skorich
,
the
line
coach
for
the
football
champion
Philadelphia
Eagles
,
was
elevated
today
to
head
coach
.
Skorich
received
a
three-year
contract
at
a
salary
believed
to
be
between
$20,000
and
$25,000
a
year
.
He
succeeds
Buck
Shaw
,
who
retired
at
the
end
of
last
season
.
The
appointment
was
announced
at
a
news
conference
at
which
Skorich
said
he
would
retain
two
members
of
Shaw's
staff
--
Jerry
Williams
and
Charlie
Gauer
.
Williams
is
a
defensive
coach
.
Gauer
works
with
the
ends
.
Choice
was
expected
The
selection
had
been
expected
.
Skorich
was
considered
the
logical
choice
after
the
club
gave
Norm
Van
Brocklin
permission
to
seek
the
head
coaching
job
with
the
Minnesota
Vikings
,
the
newest
National
Football
League
entry
.
Van
Brocklin
,
the
quarterback
who
led
the
Eagles
to
the
title
,
was
signed
by
the
Vikings
last
Wednesday
.
Philadelphia
permitted
him
to
seek
a
better
connection
after
he
had
refused
to
reconsider
his
decision
to
end
his
career
as
a
player
.
With
Skorich
at
the
helm
,
the
Eagles
are
expected
to
put
more
emphasis
on
running
,
rather
than
passing
.
In
the
past
the
club
depended
largely
on
Van
Brocklin's
aerials
.
Skorich
,
however
,
is
a
strong
advocate
of
a
balanced
attack
--
split
between
running
and
passing
.
Coach
played
3
years
Skorich
,
who
is
39
years
old
,
played
football
at
Cincinnati
University
and
then
had
a
three-year
professional
career
as
a
lineman
under
Jock
Sutherland
with
the
Pittsburgh
Steelers
.
An
injury
forced
Skorich
to
quit
after
the
1948
season
.
He
began
his
coaching
career
at
Pittsburgh
Central
Catholic
High
School
in
1949
.
He
remained
there
for
four
years
before
moving
to
Rensselaer
Polytechnic
Institute
in
Troy
,
N.
Y.
.
He
was
there
one
season
before
rejoining
the
Steelers
as
an
assistant
coach
.
Four
years
later
he
resigned
to
take
a
similar
job
with
the
Green
Bay
Packers
.
The
Eagles
signed
him
for
Shaw's
staff
in
1959
.
Skorich
began
his
new
job
auspiciously
today
.
At
a
ceremony
in
the
reception
room
of
Mayor
Richardson
Dilworth
,
the
Eagles
were
honored
for
winning
the
championship
.
Shaw
and
Skorich
headed
a
group
of
players
,
coaches
and
team
officials
who
received
an
engrossed
copy
of
an
official
city
citation
and
a
pair
of
silver
cufflinks
shaped
like
a
football
.
With
the
announcement
of
a
``
special
achievement
award
''
to
William
A.
(
(
Bill
)
Shea
,
the
awards
list
was
completed
yesterday
for
Sunday
night's
thirty-eighth
annual
dinner
and
show
of
the
New
York
Chapter
,
Baseball
Writers'
Association
of
America
,
at
the
Waldorf-Astoria
Hotel
.
Shea
,
the
chairman
of
Mayor
Wagner's
Baseball
Committee
,
will
be
joined
on
the
dais
by
Warren
Spahn
,
the
southpaw
pitching
ace
of
the
Milwaukee
Braves
;
;
Frank
Graham
,
the
Journal-American
sports
columnist
;
;
Bill
Mazeroski
,
the
World
Series
hero
of
the
Pittsburgh
Pirates
,
and
Casey
Stengel
,
the
former
manager
of
the
Yankees
.
Stengel
will
receive
the
Ben
Epstein
Good
Guy
Award
.
Mazeroski
,
whose
homer
beat
the
Yankees
in
the
final
series
game
,
will
receive
the
Babe
Ruth
Award
as
the
outstanding
player
in
the
1960
world
series
.
Graham
will
be
recognized
for
his
meritorious
service
to
baseball
and
will
get
the
William
J.
Slocum
Memorial
Award
.
To
Spahn
will
go
the
Sid
Mercer
Memorial
Award
as
the
chapter's
player
of
the
year
.
Show
follows
ceremonies
A
crowd
of
1,400
is
expected
for
the
ceremonies
,
which
will
be
followed
by
the
show
in
which
the
writers
will
lampoon
baseball
personalities
in
skit
,
dance
and
song
.
The
53-year-old
Shea
,
a
prominent
corporation
lawyer
with
a
sports
background
,
is
generally
recognized
as
the
man
most
responsible
for
the
imminent
return
of
a
National
League
club
to
New
York
.
Named
by
Mayor
Wagner
three
years
ago
to
head
a
committee
that
included
James
A.
Farley
,
Bernard
Gimbel
and
Clint
Blume
,
Shea
worked
relentlessly
.
His
goal
was
to
obtain
a
National
League
team
for
this
city
.
The
departure
of
the
Giants
and
the
Dodgers
to
California
left
New
York
with
only
the
Yankees
.
Despite
countless
barriers
and
disappointments
,
Shea
moved
forward
.
When
he
was
unable
to
bring
about
immediate
expansion
,
he
sought
to
convince
another
National
League
club
to
move
here
.
When
that
failed
,
he
enlisted
Branch
Rickey's
aid
in
the
formation
of
a
third
major
league
,
the
Continental
,
with
New
York
as
the
key
franchise
.
The
Continental
League
never
got
off
the
ground
,
but
after
two
years
it
forced
the
existing
majors
to
expand
.
Flushing
stadium
in
works
The
New
York
franchise
is
headed
by
Mrs.
Charles
Shipman
Payson
.
A
big-league
municipal
stadium
at
Flushing
Meadow
Park
is
in
the
works
,
and
once
the
lease
is
signed
the
local
club
will
be
formally
recognized
by
Commissioner
Ford
C.
Frick
.
Shea's
efforts
figure
prominently
in
the
new
stadium
.
Shea
and
his
wife
,
Nori
,
make
their
home
at
Sands
Point
,
L.
I.
.
Bill
Jr.
,
20
,
Kathy
,
15
,
and
Patricia
,
9
,
round
out
the
Shea
family
.
Shea
was
born
in
Manhattan
.
He
attended
New
York
University
before
switching
to
Georgetown
University
in
Washington
.
He
played
basketball
there
while
working
toward
a
law
degree
.
Later
,
Shea
owned
and
operated
the
Long
Island
Indians
,
a
minor
league
professional
football
team
.
He
was
the
lawyer
for
Ted
Collins'
old
Boston
Yankees
in
the
National
Football
League
.
All
was
quiet
in
the
office
of
the
Yankees
and
the
local
National
Leaguers
yesterday
.
On
Friday
,
Roger
Maris
,
the
Yankee
outfielder
and
winner
of
the
American
League's
most-valuable-player
award
,
will
meet
with
Roy
Hamey
,
the
general
manager
.
Maris
is
in
line
for
a
big
raise
.
Arnold
Palmer
and
Sam
Snead
will
be
among
those
honored
at
the
national
awards
dinner
of
the
Metropolitan
Golf
Writers
Association
tonight
.
The
dinner
will
be
held
at
the
Hotel
Pierre
.
Palmer
,
golf's
leading
money-winner
in
1960
,
and
Snead
will
be
saluted
as
the
winning
team
in
the
Canada
Cup
matches
last
June
in
Dublin
.
Deane
Beman
,
the
National
Amateur
champion
,
and
all
the
metropolitan
district
champions
,
including
Bob
Gardner
,
the
amateur
title-holder
,
also
will
receive
awards
.
The
writers'
Gold
Tee
Award
will
go
to
John
McAuliffe
of
Plainfield
,
N.
J.
,
and
Palm
Beach
,
Fla.
,
for
his
sponsorship
of
charity
tournaments
.
Horton
Smith
of
Detroit
,
a
former
president
of
the
Professional
Golfers
Association
,
will
receive
the
Ben
Hogan
Trophy
for
his
comeback
following
a
recent
illness
.
The
principal
speaker
will
be
Senator
Stuart
Symington
,
Democrat
of
Missouri
.
Golf's
golden
boy
Arnold
Palmer
has
been
a
blazing
figure
in
golf
over
the
past
twelve
months
.
He
won
the
Masters
,
the
United
States
Open
and
a
record
$80,738
in
prize
money
.
He
was
heralded
as
``
Sportsman
of
the
Year
''
by
Sports
Illustrated
,
and
last
night
was
acclaimed
in
Rochester
as
the
``
Professional
Athlete
of
the
Year
''
,
a
distinction
that
earned
for
him
the
$10,000
diamond-studded
Hickok
Belt
.
But
he
also
achieved
something
that
endeared
him
to
every
duffer
who
ever
flubbed
a
shot
.
A
couple
of
weeks
ago
,
he
scored
a
monstrous
12
on
a
par-5
hole
.
It
made
him
human
.
And
it
also
stayed
the
hands
of
thousands
of
brooding
incompetents
who
were
meditating
the
abandonment
of
a
sport
whose
frustrations
were
driving
them
to
despair
.
If
such
a
paragon
of
perfection
as
Palmer
could
commit
such
a
scoring
sacrilege
,
there
was
hope
left
for
all
.
It
was
neither
a
spirit
of
self-sacrifice
nor
a
yen
to
encourage
the
downtrodden
that
motivated
Arnold
.
He
merely
became
victimized
by
a
form
of
athletics
that
respects
no
one
and
aggravates
all
.
The
world's
best
golfer
,
shooting
below
par
,
came
to
the
last
hole
of
the
opening
round
of
the
Los
Angeles
open
with
every
intention
of
delivering
a
final
crusher
.
He
boomed
a
280-yard
drive
.
Then
the
pixies
and
the
zombies
took
over
while
the
banshees
wailed
in
the
distance
.
No
margin
for
error
On
the
narrow
fairway
of
a
508-yard
hole
,
Arnold
whipped
into
his
second
shot
.
The
ball
went
off
in
a
majestic
arc
,
an
out-of-bounds
slice
.
He
tried
again
and
once
more
sliced
out
of
bounds
.
He
hooked
the
next
two
out
of
bounds
on
the
opposite
side
.
``
It
is
possible
that
I
over-corrected
''
,
he
said
ruefully
.
Each
of
the
four
wayward
shots
cost
him
two
strokes
.
So
he
wound
up
with
a
dozen
.
``
It
was
a
nice
round
figure
,
that
12
''
,
he
said
as
he
headed
for
the
clubhouse
,
not
too
much
perturbed
.
From
the
standpoint
of
the
army
of
duffers
,
however
,
this
was
easily
the
most
heartening
exhibition
they
had
had
since
Ben
Hogan
fell
upon
evil
ways
during
his
heyday
and
scored
an
11
in
the
Texas
open
.
The
idol
of
the
hackers
,
of
course
,
is
Ray
Ainsley
,
who
achieved
a
19
in
the
United
States
Open
.
Their
secondary
hero
is
another
pro
,
Willie
Chisholm
,
who
drank
his
lunch
during
another
Open
and
tried
to
blast
his
way
out
of
a
rock-strewn
gully
.
Willie's
partner
was
Long
Jim
Barnes
,
who
tried
to
keep
count
.
Stickler
for
rules
``
How
many
is
that
,
Jim
''
?
?
Asked
Willie
at
one
stage
of
his
excavation
project
.
``
Thirteen
''
,
said
Long
Jim
.
``
Nae
,
man
''
,
said
Willie
,
``
ye
must
be
countin'
the
echoes
''
.
He
had
a
16
.
Palmer's
dozen
were
honestly
earned
.
Nor
were
there
any
rules
to
save
him
.
If
there
had
been
,
he
would
have
found
a
loophole
,
because
Arnold
is
one
golfer
who
knows
the
code
as
thoroughly
as
the
man
who
wrote
the
book
.
This
knowledge
has
come
in
handy
,
too
.
His
first
shot
in
the
Open
last
year
landed
in
a
brook
that
flowed
along
the
right
side
of
the
fairway
.
The
ball
floated
downstream
.
A
spectator
picked
up
the
ball
and
handed
it
to
a
small
boy
,
who
dropped
this
suddenly
hot
potato
in
a
very
playable
lie
.
Arnold
sent
for
Joe
Dey
,
the
executive
secretary
of
the
golf
association
.
Joe
naturally
ruled
that
a
ball
be
dropped
from
alongside
the
spot
where
it
had
originally
entered
the
stream
.
``
I
knew
it
all
along
''
,
confessed
Arnold
with
a
grin
,
``
but
I
just
happened
to
think
how
much
nicer
it
would
be
to
drop
one
way
up
there
''
.
For
a
serious
young
man
who
plays
golf
with
a
serious
intensity
,
Palmer
has
such
an
inherent
sense
of
humor
that
it
relieves
the
strain
and
keeps
his
nerves
from
jangling
like
banjo
strings
.
Yet
he
remains
the
fiercest
of
competitors
.
He'll
even
bull
head-on
into
the
rules
when
he
is
sure
he's
right
.
That's
how
he
first
won
the
Masters
in
1958
.
It
happened
on
the
twelfth
hole
,
a
155-yarder
.
Arnold's
iron
shot
from
the
tee
burrowed
into
the
bunker
guarding
the
green
,
an
embankment
that
had
become
soft
and
spongy
from
the
rains
,
thereby
bringing
local
rules
into
force
.
Ruling
from
on
high
``
I
can
remove
the
ball
,
can't
I
''
?
?
Asked
Palmer
of
an
official
.
``
No
''
,
said
the
official
.
``
You
must
play
it
where
it
lies
''
.
``
You're
wrong
''
,
said
Arnold
,
a
man
who
knows
the
rules
.
``
I'll
do
as
you
say
,
but
I'll
also
play
a
provisional
ball
and
get
a
ruling
''
.
He
scored
a
4
for
the
embedded
ball
,
a
3
with
the
provisional
one
.
The
golfing
fathers
ruled
in
his
favor
.
So
he
picked
up
a
stroke
with
the
provisional
ball
and
won
the
tournament
by
the
margin
of
that
stroke
.
Until
a
few
weeks
ago
,
however
,
Arnold
Palmer
was
some
god-like
creature
who
had
nothing
in
common
with
the
duffers
.
But
after
that
12
at
Los
Angeles
he
became
one
of
the
boys
,
a
bigger
hero
than
he
ever
had
been
before
.
A
formula
to
supply
players
for
the
new
Minneapolis
Vikings
and
the
problem
of
increasing
the
1961
schedule
to
fourteen
games
will
be
discussed
by
National
Football
League
owners
at
a
meeting
at
the
Hotel
Warwick
today
.
Other
items
on
the
agenda
during
the
meetings
,
which
are
expected
to
continue
through
Saturday
,
concern
television
,
rules
changes
,
professional
football's
hall
of
fame
,
players'
benefits
and
constitutional
amendments
.
The
owners
would
like
each
club
in
the
fourteen-team
league
to
play
a
home-and-home
series
with
teams
in
its
division
,
plus
two
games
against
teams
in
the
other
division
.
However
,
this
would
require
a
lengthening
of
the
season
from
thirteen
to
fourteen
weeks
.
Pete
Rozelle
,
the
league
commissioner
,
pointed
out
:
``
We'll
have
the
problem
of
baseball
at
one
end
and
weather
at
the
other
''
.
Nine
of
the
league's
teams
play
in
baseball
parks
and
therefore
face
an
early-season
conflict
in
dates
.
If
the
Cardinals
heed
Manager
Gene
Mauch
of
the
Phillies
,
they
won't
be
misled
by
the
Pirates'
slower
start
this
season
.
``
Pittsburgh
definitely
is
the
team
to
beat
''
,
Mauch
said
here
the
other
day
.
``
The
Pirates
showed
they
could
outclass
the
field
last
year
.
They
have
the
same
men
,
no
age
problem
,
no
injuries
and
they
also
have
Vinegar
Bend
Mizell
for
the
full
season
,
along
with
Bobby
Shantz
''
.
Tonight
at
8
o'clock
the
Cardinals
,
who
gave
the
Pirates
as
much
trouble
as
anyone
did
in
1960
,
breaking
even
with
them
,
will
get
their
first
1961
shot
at
baseball's
world
champions
.
The
Pirates
have
a
9-6
record
this
year
and
the
Redbirds
are
7-9
.
Change
in
pitchers
.
Solly
Hemus
announced
a
switch
in
his
starting
pitcher
,
from
Bob
Gibson
to
Ernie
Broglio
,
for
several
reasons
:
1
Broglio's
4-0
won-lost
record
and
1.24
earned-run
mark
against
Pittsburgh
a
year
ago
;
;
2
The
desire
to
give
Broglio
as
many
starts
as
possible
;
;
3
The
Redbirds'
disheartening
11-7
collapse
against
the
Phillies
Sunday
.
Manager
Hemus
,
eager
to
end
a
pitching
slump
that
has
brought
four
losses
in
the
five
games
on
the
current
home
stand
,
moved
Gibson
to
the
Wednesday
night
starting
assignment
.
After
Thursday's
open
date
,
Solly
plans
to
open
with
Larry
Jackson
against
the
Cubs
here
Friday
night
.
Harvey
Haddix
,
set
back
by
the
flu
this
season
,
will
start
against
his
former
Cardinal
mates
,
who
might
be
playing
without
captain
Kenny
Boyer
in
tonight's
game
at
Busch
Stadium
.
Boyer
is
suffering
from
a
stiff
neck
.
Haddix
has
a
13-8
record
against
the
Redbirds
,
despite
only
a
1-3
mark
in
1960
.
Pirate
Manager
Danny
Murtaugh
said
he
hadn't
decided
between
Mizell
and
Vern
Law
for
Wednesday's
game
.
Mizell
has
won
both
of
his
starts
.
Nieman
kept
in
lineup
.
After
a
lengthy
workout
yesterday
,
an
open
date
,
Hemus
said
that
Bob
Nieman
definitely
would
stay
in
the
lineup
.
That
means
Stan
Musial
probably
will
ride
the
bench
on
the
seventh
anniversary
of
his
record
five-home
run
day
against
the
Giants
.
``
I
have
to
stay
with
Nieman
for
a
while
''
,
Hemus
said
.
``
Bill
White
(
sore
ankles
)
should
be
ready
.
With
a
lefthander
going
for
Pittsburgh
,
I
may
use
Don
Taussig
in
center
''
.
``
Lindy
McDaniel
threw
batting
practice
about
25
minutes
,
and
he
looked
good
''
,
Hemus
said
.
``
He
should
be
getting
back
in
the
groove
before
long
.
Our
pitching
is
much
better
than
it
has
shown
''
.
The
statistics
hardly
indicated
that
the
Pirates
needed
extra
batting
practice
,
but
Murtaugh
also
turned
his
men
loose
at
Busch
Stadium
yesterday
.
Six
Bucks
over
.
Until
the
Bucs'
bats
quieted
down
a
bit
in
Cincinnati
over
the
weekend
,
the
champions
had
eight
men
hitting
over
.
Despite
the
recession
,
Pittsburgh
came
into
town
with
this
imposing
list
of
averages
:
Smoky
Burgess
,
Gino
Cimoli
,
Bill
Virdon
,
Bob
Clemente
and
Dick
Groat
,
each
,
Dick
Stuart
,
Don
Hoak
and
Bob
Skinner
.
Bill
Mazeroski
with
and
Hal
Smith
with
were
the
only
Pirates
dragging
their
feet
.
Perhaps
the
Pirate
who
will
be
the
unhappiest
over
the
news
that
Musial
probably
will
sit
out
most
of
the
series
is
Bob
Friend
,
who
was
beaten
by
The
Man
twice
last
season
on
dramatic
home
runs
.
Friend
is
off
to
a
great
start
with
a
4-0
record
but
isn't
likely
to
see
action
here
this
week
.
``
We're
getting
Friend
some
runs
for
a
change
,
and
he
has
been
pitching
good
''
,
Murtaugh
said
.
``
Virdon
has
been
blasting
the
ball
.
No
plunkers
for
him
''
.
Six
Bucs
over
.
The
Pirates
jumped
off
to
an
11-3
start
by
May
1
last
year
,
when
the
Redbirds
as
well
as
the
Dodgers
held
them
even
over
the
season
.
On
last
May
1
,
the
Cardinals
stood
at
7-6
,
ending
a
two-season
fall-off
on
that
milestone
.
In
1958
,
the
Birds
were
3-10
on
May
1
.
A
year
later
they
were
4-13
.
Since
1949
,
the
St.
Louis
club
has
been
below
on
May
1
just
four
times
.
The
'49
team
was
off
to
a
so-so
5-5
beginning
,
then
fell
as
low
as
12-17
on
May
23
before
finishing
with
96
victories
.
The
'52
Cards
were
6-7
on
May
1
but
ended
with
88
triumphs
,
the
club's
top
since
1949
.
Then
last
season
the
Birds
tumbled
as
low
as
11-18
on
May
19
before
recovering
to
make
a
race
of
it
and
total
86
victories
.
Since
1949
,
the
only
National
League
club
that
got
off
to
a
hot
start
and
made
a
runaway
of
the
race
was
the
'55
Dodger
team
.
Those
Dodgers
won
their
first
10
games
and
owned
a
21-2
mark
and
a
nine-game
lead
by
May
8
.
The
club
that
overcame
the
worst
start
in
a
comparable
period
to
win
the
pennant
was
New
York's
'51
Giants
,
who
dropped
11
of
their
first
13
.
They
honored
the
battling
Billikens
last
night
.
Speakers
at
a
Tipoff
Club
dinner
dealt
lavish
praise
to
a
group
of
St.
Louis
University
players
who
,
in
the
words
of
Coach
John
Benington
,
``
had
more
confidence
in
themselves
than
I
did
''
.
The
most
valuable
player
award
was
split
three
ways
,
among
Glen
Mankowski
,
Gordon
Hartweger
and
Tom
Kieffer
.
In
addition
,
a
special
award
was
given
to
Bob
(
Bevo
)
Nordmann
,
the
6-foot-10
center
who
missed
much
of
the
season
because
of
a
knee
injury
.
``
You
often
hear
people
talk
about
team
spirit
and
that
sort
of
thing
''
,
Benington
said
in
a
conversation
after
the
ceremonies
,
``
but
what
this
team
had
was
a
little
different
.
The
boys
had
a
tremendous
respect
for
each
other's
ability
.
They
knew
what
they
could
do
and
it
was
often
a
little
more
than
I
thought
they
could
do
.
``
Several
times
I
found
the
players
pepping
me
up
,
where
it
usually
is
the
coach
who
is
supposed
to
deliver
the
fight
talk
.
We'd
be
losing
at
halftime
to
a
good
team
and
Hartweger
would
say
,
'
Don't
worry
,
Coach
--
we'll
get
'em
all
right
'
''
.
The
trio
who
shared
the
most-valuable
honors
were
introduced
by
Bob
Broeg
,
sports
editor
of
the
Post-Dispatch
.
Kieffer
,
the
only
junior
in
the
group
,
was
commended
for
his
ability
to
hit
in
the
clutch
,
as
well
as
his
all-round
excellent
play
.
Mankowski
,
the
ball-hawking
defensive
expert
,
was
cited
for
his
performance
against
Bradley
in
St.
Louis
U.'s
nationally
televised
victory
.
Benington
said
,
``
I've
never
seen
a
player
have
a
game
as
great
as
Mankowski
did
against
Bradley
that
day
''
.
Benington
recalled
that
he
once
told
Hartweger
that
he
doubted
Gordon
would
ever
play
much
for
him
because
he
seemed
to
be
lacking
in
all
of
the
accepted
basketball
skills
.
After
the
coach
listed
all
the
boy's
faults
,
Hartweger
said
,
``
Coach
before
I
leave
here
,
you'll
get
to
like
me
''
.
Mrs.
Benington
admired
Gordon's
spirit
and
did
what
she
could
to
persuade
her
husband
that
the
boy
might
help
the
team
.
As
Hartweger
accepted
his
silver
bowl
,
he
said
,
``
I
want
to
thank
coach's
wife
for
talking
him
into
letting
me
play
''
.
Bob
Burnes
,
sports
editor
of
the
Globe-Democrat
,
presented
Bob
Nordmann
with
his
award
.
Bevo
was
congratulated
for
his
efforts
to
stay
in
shape
so
that
he
could
help
the
team
if
his
knee
healed
in
time
.
Within
a
week
after
the
injury
,
suffered
in
St.
Louis's
victory
in
the
final
game
of
the
Kentucky
tournament
,
Nordmann
was
sitting
on
the
Bill's
bench
doing
what
he
could
to
help
Benington
.
On
the
clock
given
him
was
the
inscription
,
``
For
Outstanding
Contribution
to
Billiken
Basketball
,
1960-61
''
.
Other
lettermen
from
the
team
that
compiled
a
21-9
record
and
finished
as
runner-up
in
the
National
Invitation
Tournament
were
:
Art
Hambric
,
Donnell
Reid
,
Bill
Nordmann
,
Dave
Harris
,
Dave
Luechtefeld
and
George
Latinovich
.
``
This
team
set
a
precedent
that
could
be
valuable
in
the
future
''
,
Benington
pointed
out
.
``
By
winning
against
Bradley
,
Kentucky
and
Notre
Dame
on
those
teams'
home
courts
,
they
showed
that
the
home
court
advantage
can
be
overcome
anywhere
and
that
it
doesn't
take
a
super
team
to
do
it
''
.
St.
Louis
University
found
a
way
to
win
a
baseball
game
.
Larry
Scherer
last
night
pitched
a
no-hit
game
,
said
to
be
the
first
in
Billiken
baseball
history
,
as
the
Blue
and
White
beat
Southeast
Missouri
State
College
,
5-1
,
at
Crystal
City
.
The
victory
was
the
first
of
the
season
for
the
Billikens
after
nine
defeats
and
a
tie
.
The
tie
was
against
Southeast
Missouri
last
Friday
.
Scherer
also
had
a
big
night
at
bat
with
four
hits
in
five
trips
including
a
double
,
Len
Boehmer
also
was
4-for-5
with
two
doubles
and
Dave
Ritchie
had
a
home
run
and
a
triple
.
St.
Louis
U.
was
to
be
in
action
again
today
with
a
game
scheduled
at
4
against
Washington
University
at
Ligget
Field
.
The
game
opened
a
busy
week
for
Washington
.
The
Bears
are
set
to
play
at
Harris
Teachers
College
at
3:30
tomorrow
and
have
a
doubleheader
at
Quincy
,
Ill.
,
Saturday
.
Happy
hitting
If
it's
true
that
contented
cows
give
more
milk
,
why
shouldn't
happy
ball
players
produce
more
base
hits
?
?
The
two
top
talents
of
the
time
,
Mickey
Mantle
and
Willie
Mays
,
have
hit
the
ball
harder
and
more
successfully
so
far
this
early
season
than
at
any
period
in
careers
which
,
to
be
frank
about
it
,
never
have
quite
reached
expectations
.
And
that's
meant
as
a
boost
,
not
a
knock
.
Mays
and
Mantle
,
both
10-year
men
at
30
,
have
so
much
ability
that
,
baseball
men
agree
,
they've
never
hit
the
heights
.
Their
heights
,
that
is
.
Mantle
,
the
bull-necked
blond
switch-hitter
,
had
one
sensational
triple-crown
season
,
1959
,
when
he
batted
and
also
led
the
American
League
in
home
runs
,
52
,
and
rbi's
,
130
.
Like
the
Yankees'
slugger
,
Mays
,
the
terror
of
the
Giants
,
has
had
seasons
that
would
be
considered
the
ultimate
by
most
players
,
but
not
by
--
or
for
--
Willie
.
His
best
years
were
1954
when
he
hit
with
41
homers
and
'55
when
he
belted
51
home
runs
,
drove
in
127
and
stole
24
bases
.
Now
,
apparently
happier
under
new
managers
,
Mays
and
Mantle
,
the
perfect
players
,
are
behaving
as
though
they're
going
to
pass
those
previous
peaks
.
Labor
relations
Yes
,
we
know
,
they're
professionals
,
men
paid
to
play
,
and
they
shouldn't
care
how
they're
handled
,
just
as
long
as
their
names
are
spelled
correctly
on
the
first
and
fifteenth
of
each
month
.
The
truth
is
,
though
,
that
men
react
differently
to
different
treatment
.
For
that
matter
,
Stan
Musial
is
rare
,
possessing
the
disposition
that
enabled
him
to
put
out
the
same
for
seven
managers
,
reserving
his
opinions
,
but
not
his
effort
.
Mantle
,
it's
apparent
,
resented
Casey
Stengel's
attempts
to
push
and
prod
him
into
the
perfection
the
veteran
manager
saw
as
a
thrilling
possibility
.
The
old
man
was
almost
too
possessive
.
Stengel
inherited
DiMaggio
,
Rizzuto
,
but
he
brought
up
Mantle
from
Class
C
to
the
majors
,
from
Joplin
to
New
York
.
With
the
speed
and
power
of
the
body
beautiful
he
saw
before
him
,
Ol'
Case
wanted
No.
7
to
be
not
only
the
best
homerun
hitter
,
but
also
the
best
bunter
,
base-runner
and
outfielder
.
Stengel
probably
preached
too
much
in
the
early
days
when
the
kid
wanted
to
pop
his
bubble
gum
and
sow
his
oats
.
Inheriting
a
more
mature
Mantle
,
who
now
has
seen
the
sights
on
and
off
Broadway
,
Ralph
Houk
quietly
bestowed
,
no
pun
intended
,
the
mantle
of
authority
on
Mickey
.
The
Major
decided
that
,
rather
than
be
led
,
the
slugger
could
lead
.
And
what
leadership
a
proud
Mantle
has
given
so
far
.
The
opinion
continues
here
that
with
a
162-game
schedule
,
pitching
spread
thin
through
a
10-team
league
and
a
most
inviting
target
in
Los
Angeles'
Wrigley
Field
Jr.
,
Mantle
just
might
break
the
most
glamorous
record
on
the
books
,
Babe
Ruth's
60
homers
of
1927
.
Four
for
Alvin
Mays'
day
came
a
day
earlier
for
Willie
than
for
the
kids
and
Commies
this
year
.
Willie's
wonderful
walloping
Sunday
--
four
home
runs
--
served
merely
to
emphasize
how
happy
he
is
to
be
playing
for
Alvin
Dark
.
Next
to
Leo
Durocher
,
Dark
taught
Mays
the
most
when
he
was
a
grass-green
rookie
rushed
up
to
the
Polo
Grounds
10
years
ago
this
month
,
to
help
the
Giants
win
a
dramatic
pennant
.
Romantic
news
concerns
Mrs.
Joan
Monroe
Armour
and
F.
Lee
H.
Wendell
,
who
are
to
be
married
at
4:30
p.m.
tomorrow
in
the
Lake
Forest
home
of
her
brother
,
J.
Hampton
Monroe
,
and
Mrs.
Monroe
.
Only
the
families
and
a
dozen
close
friends
will
be
present
.
The
bride's
brother
,
Walter
D.
Monroe
Jr.
,
will
give
her
in
marriage
.
In
the
small
group
will
be
the
junior
and
senior
Mrs.
Walter
Monroe
;
;
the
bridegroom's
parents
,
the
Barrett
Wendells
,
who
are
returning
from
a
winter
holiday
in
Sarasota
,
Fla.
,
for
the
occasion
;
;
and
his
brother
,
Mr.
Wendell
Jr.
,
and
his
wife
,
who
will
arrive
from
Boston
.
Mr.
Wendell
Jr.
will
be
best
man
.
Also
present
will
be
the
bride's
children
,
Joan
,
13
,
and
Kirkland
,
11
.
Their
father
is
Charles
B.
Armour
.
The
bridegroom's
children
were
here
for
the
Christmas
holidays
and
can't
return
.
Young
Peter
Wendell
,
a
student
at
the
Westminster
school
,
has
measles
,
and
his
sister
,
Mrs.
Andrew
Thomas
,
and
her
husband
,
who
live
in
Missoula
,
Mont.
,
have
a
new
baby
.
Their
mother
is
Mrs.
Camilla
Alsop
Wendell
.
Mr.
Wendell
and
his
bride
will
live
in
his
Lake
Forest
house
.
They
will
take
a
wedding
trip
later
.
'
back
with
the
Met
``
We
are
back
with
the
'
Met
'
again
now
that
the
'
Met
'
is
back
in
Chicago
''
,
bulletins
Mrs.
Frank
S.
Sims
,
president
of
the
women's
board
of
the
University
of
Chicago
Cancer
Research
Foundation
.
The
New
York
Metropolitan
Opera
Company
will
be
here
in
May
,
and
the
board
will
sponsor
the
Saturday
night
,
May
13
,
performance
of
``
Turandot
''
as
a
benefit
.
Birgit
Nilsson
will
be
starred
.
``
Housed
in
the
new
McCormick
Place
theater
,
this
should
prove
to
be
an
exciting
evening
''
,
adds
Mrs.
Sims
.
The
board's
last
money
raising
event
was
a
performance
by
Harry
Belafonte
--
``
quite
off-beat
for
this
group
''
,
decided
some
of
the
members
.
Mrs.
Henry
T.
Sulcer
of
Winnetka
,
a
new
board
member
,
will
be
chairman
of
publicity
for
the
benefit
.
Her
husband
recently
was
appointed
vice
president
of
the
university
,
bringing
them
back
here
from
the
east
.
Parichy-Hamm
Because
of
the
recent
death
of
the
bride's
father
,
Frederick
B.
Hamm
,
the
marriage
of
Miss
Terry
Hamm
to
John
Bruce
Parichy
will
be
a
small
one
at
noon
tomorrow
in
St.
Bernadine's
church
,
Forest
Park
.
A
small
reception
will
follow
in
the
Oak
Park
Arms
hotel
.
Mrs.
Hamm
will
not
come
from
Vero
Beach
,
Fla.
,
for
the
wedding
.
However
,
Mr.
Parichy
and
his
bride
will
go
to
Vero
Beach
on
their
wedding
trip
,
and
will
stay
in
the
John
G.
Beadles'
beach
house
.
The
Beadles
formerly
lived
in
Lake
Forest
.
Harvey
B.
Stevens
of
Kenilworth
will
give
his
niece
in
marriage
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Stevens
and
the
bride's
other
uncles
and
aunts
,
the
Rush
C.
Butlers
,
the
Homer
E.
Robertsons
,
and
the
David
Q.
Porters
,
will
give
the
bridal
dinner
tonight
in
the
Stevenses'
home
.
Here
and
there
The
Chicago
Press
club
will
fete
George
E.
Barnes
,
president
of
the
United
States
Lawn
Tennis
association
,
at
a
cocktail
party
and
buffet
supper
beginning
at
5:30
p.m.
tomorrow
.
Later
,
a
bus
will
carry
members
to
the
Chicago
Stadium
to
see
Jack
Kramer's
professional
tennis
matches
at
8
p.m.
.
With
loud
huzzahs
for
the
artistic
success
of
the
Presbyterian-St.
Luke's
Fashion
show
still
ringing
in
her
ears
,
its
director
,
Helen
Tieken
Geraghty
(
Mrs.
Maurice
P.
Geraghty
)
is
taking
off
tomorrow
on
a
56
day
world
trip
which
should
earn
her
even
greater
acclaim
as
director
of
entertainment
for
next
summer's
International
Trade
fair
.
Armed
with
letters
from
embassies
to
ministers
of
countries
,
especially
those
in
the
near
and
far
east
,
Mrs.
Geraghty
``
will
beat
the
bushes
for
oriental
talent
''
.
``
We
(
the
Chicago
Association
of
Commerce
and
Industry
)
expect
to
establish
closer
relations
with
nations
and
their
cultural
activities
,
and
it
will
be
easy
as
a
member
of
the
fair
staff
to
bring
in
acts
''
,
explains
Mrs.
Geraghty
.
``
For
instance
,
Djakarta
,
Indonesia
,
has
three
groups
of
dancers
interested
in
coming
here
.
I'm
even
going
to
try
to
get
the
whirling
dervishes
of
Damascus
''
!
!
The
last
obstacle
in
Mrs.
Geraghty's
globe-girdling
trip
was
smoothed
out
when
a
representative
of
Syria
called
upon
her
to
explain
that
his
brother
would
meet
her
at
the
border
of
that
country
--
so
newly
separated
from
Egypt
and
the
United
Arab
Republic
that
she
hadn't
been
able
to
obtain
a
visa
.
First
,
Honolulu
Honolulu
will
be
Mrs.
Geraghty's
first
stop
.
Then
Japan
,
Hong
Kong
,
Manila
,
India
,
Pakistan
,
Damascus
,
Beirut
,
and
to
Rome
,
London
,
and
Paris
``
to
look
over
wonderful
talent
''
.
Dec.
22
is
the
deadline
for
Mrs.
Geraghty's
return
;
;
the
Geraghtys'
youngest
daughter
,
Molly
,
bows
in
the
Passavant
Debutante
Cotillion
the
next
night
.
Molly
already
has
her
cotillion
gown
,
and
it's
fitted
,
says
her
mother
.
Also
,
invitations
have
been
addressed
to
Molly's
debut
tea
the
afternoon
of
Dec.
29
in
the
Arts
club
.
It
won't
be
a
``
tea
''
,
however
,
but
more
of
an
international
folk
song
festival
,
with
singers
from
Chicago's
foreign
groups
to
sing
Christmas
songs
from
around
the
world
.
The
international
theme
will
be
continued
with
the
Balkan
strings
playing
for
a
dinner
the
Byron
Harveys
will
give
in
the
Racquet
club
after
the
tea
.
Miss
Abra
Prentice's
debut
supper
dance
in
the
Casino
will
wind
up
the
day
.
Burke-Rostagno
The
Richard
S.
Burkes'
home
in
Wayne
may
be
the
setting
for
the
wedding
reception
for
their
daughter
,
Helen
Lambert
,
and
the
young
Italian
she
met
last
year
while
studying
in
Florence
during
her
junior
year
at
Smith
college
.
He
is
Aldo
Rostagno
,
son
of
the
Guglielmo
Rostagnos
of
Florence
whom
the
Burkes
met
last
year
in
Europe
.
The
Burkes
,
who
now
live
in
Kankakee
,
are
telling
friends
of
the
engagement
.
Miss
Burke
,
a
graduate
of
Miss
Hall's
school
,
stayed
on
in
Florence
as
a
career
girl
.
Her
fiance
,
who
is
with
a
publishing
firm
,
translates
many
books
from
English
into
Italian
.
He
will
be
coming
here
on
business
in
December
,
when
the
wedding
is
to
take
place
in
Wayne
.
Miss
Burke
will
arrive
in
December
also
.
Here
and
there
A
farewell
supper
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Charles
H.
Sethness
Jr.
planned
Sunday
for
Italian
Consul
General
and
Mrs.
Giacomo
Profili
has
been
canceled
because
Mr.
Sethness
is
in
Illinois
Masonic
hospital
for
surgery
.
Mrs.
William
Odell
,
Mrs.
Clinton
B.
King
,
John
Holabird
Jr.
,
Norman
Boothby
,
and
Actress
Maureen
O'Sullivan
will
judge
the
costumes
in
the
grand
march
at
the
Affaire
Old
Towne
Bal
Masque
tomorrow
in
the
Germania
club
.
The
party
is
to
raise
money
for
the
Old
Town
Art
center
and
to
plant
more
crabapple
trees
along
the
streets
of
Old
Town
.
Lyon
around
:
Columnist
Walter
Winchell
,
well
and
rat-a-tat-tatty
again
,
wheeled
thru
town
between
trains
yesterday
en
route
to
his
Phoenix
,
Ariz.
,
rancho
,
portable
typewriter
in
hand
.
If
W.
W.'s
retiring
soon
,
as
hinted
,
he
ain't
talking
--
yet
.
Pretty
Sunny
Ainsworth
,
the
ex-Mrs.
Tommy
Manville
and
the
ex-Mrs.
Bud
Arvey
,
joined
Playboy-Show-Biz
Illustrated
,
as
a
promotional
copy
writer
.
She's
a
whiz
.
You
can
get
into
an
argument
about
fallout
shelters
at
the
drop
of
a
beer
stein
in
clubs
and
pubs
these
nights
.
Everybody
has
a
different
idea
on
the
ethics
and
morals
of
driving
away
neighbors
,
when
and
if
.
Comic
Gary
Morton
signed
to
play
the
Living
Room
here
Dec.
18
,
because
that's
the
only
time
his
heart
,
Lucille
Ball
,
can
come
along
.
And
watch
for
a
headline
from
this
pair
any
time
now
.
The
Living
Room
has
another
scoop
:
Jane
Russell
will
make
one
of
her
rare
night
club
singing
appearances
there
,
opening
Jan.
22
.
La
Russell's
run
in
``
Skylark
''
,
debuting
next
week
at
Drury
Lane
,
already
is
a
sellout
.
Johnny
Ray
,
at
the
same
L.
R.
,
has
something
to
cry
about
.
He's
been
warbling
in
severe
pain
;
;
a
medico's
injection
inflamed
a
nerve
,
and
Johnny
can
barely
walk
.
Charley
Simonelli
,
top
Universal-International
film
studio
exec
,
makes
an
honest
man
out
of
this
column
.
As
we
bulletin'd
way
back
,
he'll
wed
pretty
Rosemary
Strafaci
,
of
the
Golf
Mag
staff
,
in
N.
Y.
C.
today
.
Handsome
bachelor
Charley
was
a
favorite
date
of
many
of
Hollywood's
glamor
gals
for
years
.
George
Simon
,
exec
director
of
Danny
Thomas
A.
L.
S.
A.
C.
(
Aiding
Leukemia
Stricken
American
Children
)
fund
raising
group
,
filled
me
in
on
the
low-down
phonies
who
are
using
phones
to
solicit
funds
for
Danny's
St.
Jude
hospital
in
Memphis
.
There
is
no
such
thing
as
an
``
emergency
telephone
building
fund
drive
''
.
The
only
current
event
they're
staging
is
the
big
show
at
the
Stadium
Nov.
25
,
when
Danny
will
entertain
thousands
of
underprivileged
kids
.
You
can
mail
contribs
to
Danny
Thomas
,
Post
Office
Box
7599
,
Chicago
.
So
,
if
anybody
solicits
by
phone
,
make
sure
you
mail
the
dough
to
the
above
.
Olivia
De
Havilland
signed
to
do
a
Broadway
play
for
Garson
Kanin
this
season
,
``
A
Gift
of
Time
''
.
She'll
move
to
Gotham
after
years
in
Paris
.
Gorgeous
Doris
Day
and
her
producer-hubby
,
Marty
Melcher
,
drive
in
today
from
a
motor
tour
thru
New
England
.
D.
D.
will
pop
up
with
U-I
Chief
Milt
Rackmil
at
the
Carnegie
theater
tomorrow
to
toast
300
movie
exhibitors
.
It'll
be
an
all
day
affair
with
screenings
of
Doris'
new
one
,
``
Lover
Come
Back
''
,
and
``
Flower
Drum
Song
''
.
Whee
the
People
:
Lovely
Thrush
Annamorena
gave
up
a
promising
show
biz
career
to
apply
glamor
touches
to
her
hubby
,
Ray
Lenobel's
fur
firm
here
.
Typical
touch
:
She
sold
a
$10,000
morning
light
mink
to
Sportsman
Freddie
Wacker
for
his
frau
,
Jana
Mason
,
also
an
ex-singer
.
In
honor
of
the
Wackers'
new
baby
.
Fur
goodness
sake
!
!
Emcee
Jack
Herbert
insists
Dick
Nixon's
campaign
slogan
for
governor
of
California
is
,
``
Knight
Must
Fall
''
!
!
Give
generously
when
you
buy
candy
today
for
the
Brain
Research
Foundation
.
It's
one
of
our
town's
worthiest
charities
.
Best
Bet
for
Tonight
:
That
darlin'
dazzler
from
Paree
,
Genevieve
,
opening
in
the
Empire
room
.
Dave
Trager
,
who
is
quite
a
showman
and
boss
of
Chicago's
new
pro
basketball
Packers
,
is
debuting
a
new
International
club
,
for
the
exclusive
use
of
season
ticket
holders
,
in
the
Stock
Yards
Inn
.
Jump
off
is
tomorrow
night
when
the
Packs
meet
St.
Louis
in
their
season
home
opener
.
Nobody's
mentioned
it
,
but
when
ol'
Casey
Stengel
takes
over
as
boss
of
the
New
York
Mets
,
he'll
be
the
only
baseballight
ever
to
wear
the
uniform
of
all
New
York
area
clubs
,
past
and
present
:
Yankees
,
Dodgers
,
Giants
,
and
now
the
Mets
.
And
Bernie
Kriss
calls
the
bayonet
clashes
at
Berlin's
Brandenburg
Gate
,
``
The
Battle
of
the
Sentry
''
!
!
The
jotted
Lyon
:
This
mad
world
dept.
:
Khrush
and
the
Kremlin
crowd
are
confident
all
right
.
They're
contaminating
the
earth's
atmosphere
including
their
own
via
mighty
megaton
bombs
but
their
own
peasants
still
don't
know
about
it
!
!
More
:
On
the
free
world
side
.
Albert
John
Luthuli
,
awarded
a
Nobel
prize
for
his
South
African
integration
struggles
,
has
to
get
permission
to
fly
to
collect
his
honor
.
Hmpf
But
on
to
the
frothier
side
Johnny
Weissmuller
,
the
only
real
Tarzan
,
telephoned
Maureen
O'Sullivan
,
his
first
``
Jane
''
(
now
at
Drury
Lane
)
and
muttered
,
``
Me
Tarzan
,
this
Jane
''
?
?
Snapped
Maureen
,
``
Me
Jane
''
!
!
Actually
Johnny
is
a
glib
,
garrulous
guy
,
with
a
rare
sense
of
humor
.
Everywhere
he
went
in
town
,
people
sidled
up
,
gave
him
the
guttural
bit
or
broke
into
a
frightening
Tarzan
yodel
.
He
kids
his
Tarzan
roles
more
than
anyone
.
``
La
Dolce
Vita
''
,
the
dynamite
Italian
flicker
,
opens
at
popular
prices
at
the
Loop
theater
Nov.
2
.
My
idea
of
masterful
movie
making
.
Bill
Veeck's
health
is
back
to
the
dynamo
stage
,
but
his
medics
insist
he
rest
for
several
more
months
before
getting
back
into
the
baseball
swim
.
William
keeps
up
with
our
town's
doings
daily
,
via
the
Tribune
,
and
he
tells
me
he
never
misses
the
Ticker
.
That's
our
boy
Bill
.
Jean
Fardulli's
Blue
Angel
is
the
first
top
local
club
to
import
that
crazy
new
dance
,
the
Twist
.
They'll
start
lessons
,
too
,
pronto
.
A
cheer
here
for
Francis
Lorenz
,
state
treasurer
,
who
will
meet
with
the
probate
advisory
board
of
the
Chicago
Bar
association
,
for
suggestions
on
how
to
handle
the
opening
of
safety
deposit
boxes
after
somebody
dies
.
After
being
closed
for
seven
months
,
the
Garden
of
the
Gods
Club
will
have
its
gala
summer
opening
Saturday
,
June
3
.
Music
for
dancing
will
be
furnished
by
Allen
Uhles
and
his
orchestra
,
who
will
play
each
Saturday
during
June
.
Members
and
guests
will
be
in
for
an
added
surprise
with
the
new
wing
containing
40
rooms
and
suites
,
each
with
its
own
private
patio
.
Gene
Marshall
,
genial
manager
of
the
club
,
has
announced
that
the
Garden
of
the
Gods
will
open
to
members
Thursday
,
June
1
.
Beginning
July
4
,
there
will
be
an
orchestra
playing
nightly
except
Sunday
and
Monday
for
the
summer
season
.
Mrs.
J.
Edward
Hackstaff
and
Mrs.
Paul
Luette
are
planning
a
luncheon
next
week
in
honor
of
Mrs.
J.
Clinton
Bowman
,
who
celebrates
her
birthday
on
Tuesday
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Jerry
Chase
announce
the
birth
of
a
daughter
,
Sheila
,
on
Wednesday
in
Mercy
Hospital
.
Grandparents
are
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Robert
L.
Chase
and
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Guy
Mullenax
of
Kittredge
.
Mrs.
Chase
is
the
former
Miss
Mary
Mullenax
.
Back
to
w.
coast
Mrs.
McIntosh
Buell
will
leave
Sunday
to
return
to
her
home
in
Santa
Barbara
,
Calif.
,
after
spending
a
week
in
her
Polo
Grounds
home
.
Mrs.
John
C.
Vroman
Jr.
of
Manzanola
is
spending
several
days
in
her
Sherman
Plaza
apartment
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Merrill
Shoup
have
returned
to
their
home
in
Colorado
Springs
after
spending
a
few
days
at
the
Brown
Palace
Hotel
.
Brig.
Gen.
and
Mrs.
Robert
F.
McDermott
will
entertain
at
a
black
tie
dinner
Wednesday
,
May
3
,
in
the
Officers'
Club
at
the
Air
Force
Academy
.
Cocktail
party
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Piero
De
Luise
will
honor
Italian
Consul
and
Mrs.
Emilio
Bassi
at
a
cocktail
party
Tuesday
,
May
2
,
from
6
to
8
p.m.
in
their
home
.
The
Bassis
are
leaving
soon
for
their
new
post
.
There
will
be
a
stag
dinner
Friday
evening
at
the
Denver
Country
Club
which
will
precede
the
opening
of
the
1961
golf
season
.
Cocktails
will
be
served
from
6
to
7
p.m.
,
with
dinner
at
7
and
entertainment
in
the
main
dining
room
immediately
following
.
Miss
Betsy
Parker
was
one
of
the
speakers
on
the
panel
of
the
Eastern
Women's
Liberal
Arts
College
panel
on
Wednesday
evening
in
the
Security
Life
Bldg.
.
Guests
were
juniors
in
the
public
high
schools
.
Fashion
show
The
committee
for
the
annual
Central
City
fashion
show
has
been
announced
by
Mrs.
D.
W.
Moore
,
chairman
.
The
event
,
staged
yearly
by
Neusteters
,
will
be
held
in
the
Opera
House
Wednesday
,
Aug.
16
.
It
will
be
preceded
by
luncheon
in
the
Teter
House
.
Mrs.
Roger
Mead
is
head
of
the
luncheon
table
decorations
.
Mrs.
Stanley
Wright
is
ticket
chairman
and
Mrs.
Theodore
Pate
is
in
charge
of
publicity
.
Members
of
the
committee
include
Mrs.
Milton
Bernet
,
Mrs.
J.
Clinton
Bowman
,
Mrs.
Rollie
W.
Bradford
,
Mrs.
Samuel
Butler
Jr.
,
Mrs.
Donald
Carr
Campbell
,
Mrs.
Douglas
Carruthers
,
Mrs.
John
C.
Davis
3
,
,
Mrs.
Cris
Dobbins
,
Mrs.
William
E.
Glass
,
Mrs.
Alfred
Hicks
2
,
,
Mrs.
Donald
Magarrell
,
Mrs.
Willett
Moore
,
Mrs.
Myron
Neusteter
,
Mrs.
Richard
Gibson
Smith
,
Mrs.
James
S.
Sudier
2
,
and
Mrs.
Thomas
Welborn
.
The
first
committee
meeting
will
be
held
on
May
19
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Andrew
S.
Kelsey
of
Washington
,
D.C.
,
announce
the
birth
of
a
daughter
,
Kira
Ann
Kelsey
,
on
Monday
in
Washington
,
D.C.
.
Grandparents
are
Mr.
and
Mrs.
R.L.
Rickenbaugh
and
Mr.
and
Mrs.
E.O.
Kelsey
of
Scarsdale
,
N.Y.
.
Mrs.
Kelsey
is
the
former
Miss
Ann
Rickenbaugh
.
A
cheery
smile
,
a
compassionate
interest
in
others
and
a
practical
down-to-earth
approach
.
Those
qualities
make
Esther
Marr
a
popular
asset
at
the
Salvation
Army's
Social
Center
at
1200
Larimer
St.
.
The
pert
,
gray-haired
woman
who
came
to
Denver
three
years
ago
from
Buffalo
,
N.Y.
,
is
a
``
civilian
''
with
the
Army
.
Her
position
covers
a
number
of
daily
tasks
common
to
any
social
director
.
The
job
also
covers
a
number
of
other
items
.
``
Mom
''
Marr
,
as
the
more
than
80
men
at
the
center
call
her
,
is
the
link
that
helps
to
bridge
the
gulf
between
alcoholics
and
the
outside
world
and
between
parolees
and
society
.
Her
day
starts
early
,
but
no
matter
how
many
pressing
letters
there
are
to
be
written
(
and
during
May
,
which
is
National
Salvation
Army
Week
,
there
are
plenty
)
,
schedules
to
be
made
or
problems
to
be
solved
,
Mrs.
Marr's
office
is
always
open
and
the
welcome
mat
is
out
.
Mrs.
Marr
is
the
first
contact
a
Skid
Row
figure
talks
to
after
he
decides
he
wants
to
pick
himself
up
.
She
sees
that
there
is
a
cup
of
steaming
hot
coffee
awaiting
him
and
the
two
chat
informally
as
she
presents
the
rules
of
the
center
and
explains
procedures
.
``
Usually
at
this
point
a
man
is
withdrawn
from
society
and
one
of
my
jobs
is
to
see
that
he
relearns
to
mingle
with
his
fellow
men
''
,
Mrs.
Marr
explained
.
The
Denverite
has
worked
out
an
entire
program
to
achieve
this
using
the
facilities
of
the
center
.
``
And
I
bum
tickets
to
everything
I
can
''
,
she
said
.
``
I've
become
the
greatest
beggar
in
the
world
''
.
In
addition
to
the
tickets
to
the
movies
,
sporting
events
and
concerts
,
Mrs.
Marr
lines
up
candy
and
cookies
because
alcoholics
require
a
lot
of
sweets
to
replace
the
sugar
in
their
system
.
Mrs.
Marr
also
has
a
number
of
parolees
to
``
mother
''
,
watching
to
see
that
they
do
not
break
their
parole
and
that
they
also
learn
to
readjust
to
society
.
By
mid-June
,
millions
of
Americans
will
take
to
the
road
on
vacation
trips
up
and
down
and
back
and
forth
across
this
vast
and
lovely
land
.
In
another
four
weeks
,
with
schools
closed
across
the
nation
,
the
great
all-American
summer
safari
will
be
under
way
.
By
July
1
,
six
weeks
from
now
,
motel-keepers
all
over
the
nation
will
,
by
6
p.m.
,
be
switching
on
that
bleak
--
to
motorists
--
sign
,
``
No
Vacancy
''
.
No
matter
how
many
Americans
go
abroad
in
summer
,
probably
a
hundred
times
as
many
gas
up
the
family
car
,
throw
suitcases
,
kids
and
comic
books
in
the
back
seat
,
and
head
for
home
.
And
where
is
``
home
''
,
that
magic
place
of
the
heart
?
?
Ah
,
that
is
simple
.
Home
is
where
a
man
was
born
,
reared
,
went
to
school
and
,
most
particularly
,
where
grandma
is
.
That
is
where
we
turn
in
the
good
old
summertime
.
The
land
lies
ready
for
the
coming
onslaught
.
My
husband
and
I
,
a
month
ahead
of
the
rush
,
have
just
finished
a
7-day
motor
journey
of
2809
miles
from
Tucson
,
Ariz.
,
to
New
York
City
:
set
for
influx
I
can
testify
that
motels
,
service
and
comfort
stations
(
they
go
together
like
Scots
and
heather
)
,
dog
wagons
,
roadside
restaurants
,
souvenir
stands
and
snake
farms
are
braced
and
waiting
.
I
hope
it
can
be
said
without
boasting
that
no
other
nation
offers
its
vacationing
motorists
such
variety
and
beauty
of
scene
,
such
an
excellent
network
of
roads
on
which
to
enjoy
it
and
such
decent
,
far-flung
over-night
accommodations
.
Maybe
motel-keeping
isn't
the
nation's
biggest
industry
,
but
it
certainly
looks
that
way
from
the
highway
.
There
are
motels
for
all
purposes
and
all
tastes
.
There
are
even
motels
for
local
weather
peculiarities
in
Shamrock
,
Tex.
,
as
I
discovered
.
There
the
Royal
Motel
advertises
``
all
facilities
,
vented
heat
,
air
conditioned
,
carpeted
,
free
TV
,
storm
cellar
''
.
Many
with
pools
Innumerable
motels
from
Tucson
to
New
York
boast
swimming
pools
(
``
swim
at
your
own
risk
''
is
the
hospitable
sign
poised
at
the
brink
of
most
pools
)
.
Some
even
boast
two
pools
,
one
for
adults
and
one
for
children
.
But
the
Royal
Motel
in
Shamrock
was
the
only
one
that
offered
the
comfort
and
security
of
a
storm
cellar
.
Motorists
like
myself
who
can
remember
the
old
``
tourists
accommodated
''
signs
on
farm
houses
and
village
homes
before
World
War
2
,
can
only
marvel
at
the
great
size
and
the
luxury
of
the
relatively
new
and
fast-grossing
motel
business
.
All
for
$14
!
!
At
the
Boxwood
Motel
in
Winchester
,
Va.
,
we
accidentally
drew
the
honeymoon
suite
,
an
elegant
affair
with
wall-to-wall
carpeting
,
gold
and
white
furniture
,
pink
satin
brocade
chairs
,
24-inch
TV
and
a
pink
tile
bath
with
masses
of
pink
towels
.
All
for
$14
.
That
made
up
for
the
``
best
''
motel
in
Norman
,
Okla.
,
where
the
proprietor
knocked
$2
off
the
$8.50
tab
when
we
found
ants
in
the
pressed-paper
furniture
.
Oxnard
,
Calif.
,
will
be
the
home
of
the
Rev.
Robert
D.
Howard
and
his
bride
,
the
former
Miss
Judith
Ellen
Gay
,
who
were
married
Saturday
at
the
Munger
Place
Methodist
Church
.
Parents
of
the
bride
are
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Ferris
M.
Gay
,
7034
Coronado
.
The
bridegroom
is
the
son
of
Mrs.
James
Baines
of
Los
Angeles
,
Calif.
,
and
Carl
E.
Howard
of
Santa
Monica
,
Calif.
.
He
is
a
graduate
of
UCLA
and
Perkins
School
of
Theology
,
Aj
.
Dr.
W.
B.
I.
Martin
officiated
,
and
the
bride
was
given
in
marriage
by
her
father
.
Honor
attendants
for
the
couple
were
Miss
Sandra
Branum
and
Warren
V.
McRoberts
.
The
couple
will
honeymoon
in
Sequoia
National
Park
,
Calif.
.
Miss
Joan
Frances
Baker
,
a
graduate
of
SMU
,
was
married
Saturday
to
Elvis
Leonard
Mason
,
an
honor
graduate
of
Lamar
State
College
of
Technology
,
in
the
chapel
of
the
First
Presbyterian
Church
of
Houston
.
The
bride
,
daughter
of
Rhodes
Semmes
Baker
Jr.
of
Houston
and
the
late
Mrs.
Baker
,
was
president
of
Kappa
Kappa
Gamma
and
a
member
of
Mortar
Board
at
Aj
.
Her
husband
,
who
is
the
son
of
Alton
John
Mason
of
Shreveport
,
La.
,
and
the
late
Mrs.
Henry
Cater
Parmer
,
was
president
of
Alpha
Tau
Omega
and
a
member
of
Delta
Sigma
Pi
at
Lamar
Tech
,
and
did
graduate
work
at
Rhodes
University
in
Grahamstown
,
South
Africa
,
on
a
Rotary
Fellowship
.
The
Rev.
Richard
Freeman
of
Texas
City
officiated
and
Charles
Pabor
and
Mrs.
Marvin
Hand
presented
music
.
The
bride
was
given
in
marriage
by
her
father
.
She
wore
a
court-length
gown
of
organdy
designed
with
bateau
neckline
and
princesse
skirt
accented
by
lace
appliques
.
Her
veil
was
caught
to
a
crown
,
and
she
carried
gardenias
and
stephanotis
.
Miss
Mary
Ross
of
Baird
was
maid
of
honor
,
and
bridesmaids
were
Miss
Pat
Dawson
of
Austin
,
Mrs.
Howard
M.
Dean
of
Hinsdale
,
Ill.
,
and
Mrs.
James
A.
Reeder
of
Shreveport
,
La.
.
Cecil
Mason
of
Hartford
,
Conn.
,
was
best
man
for
his
brother
,
and
groomsmen
were
Rhodes
S.
Baker
3
,
of
Houston
,
Dr.
James
Carter
of
Houston
and
Conrad
McEachern
of
New
Orleans
,
La.
.
Lee
Jackson
and
Ken
Smith
,
both
of
Houston
,
and
Alfred
Neumann
of
Beaumont
seated
guests
.
After
a
reception
at
The
Mayfair
,
the
newlyweds
left
for
a
wedding
trip
to
New
Orleans
,
La.
.
They
will
live
in
Corpus
Christi
.
Miss
Shirley
Joan
Meredith
,
a
former
student
of
North
Texas
State
University
,
was
married
Saturday
to
Larry
W.
Mills
,
who
has
attended
Arlington
State
College
.
They
will
live
at
2705
Fitzhugh
after
a
wedding
trip
to
Corpus
Christi
.
Parents
of
the
couple
are
Ray
Meredith
of
Denton
and
the
late
Mrs.
Meredith
and
Mrs.
Hardy
P.
Mills
of
Floresville
and
the
late
Mr.
Mills
.
The
Rev.
Melvin
Carter
officiated
at
the
ceremony
in
Slaughter
Chapel
of
the
First
Baptist
Church
.
Dan
Beam
presented
music
and
the
bride
was
given
in
marriage
by
her
father
.
She
wore
a
gown
of
satin
designed
along
princesse
lines
and
featuring
a
flared
skirt
and
lace
jacket
with
bateau
neckline
.
Her
veil
was
caught
to
a
pearl
headdress
,
and
she
carried
stephanotis
and
orchids
.
Miss
Glenda
Kay
Meredith
of
Denton
was
her
sister's
maid
of
honor
,
and
Vernon
Lewelleyn
of
San
Angelo
was
best
man
.
Robert
Lovelace
and
Cedric
Burgher
Jr.
seated
guests
.
A
reception
was
held
at
the
church
.
The
First
Christian
Church
of
Pampa
was
the
setting
for
the
wedding
last
Sunday
of
Miss
Marcile
Marie
Glison
and
Thomas
Earl
Loving
Jr.
,
who
will
live
at
8861
Gaston
after
a
wedding
trip
to
New
Orleans
,
La.
The
bride
,
daughter
of
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Charles
Ervin
Glison
of
Pampa
,
has
attended
Texas
Woman's
University
and
will
continue
her
studies
at
Aj
.
``
A
Night
in
New
Orleans
''
is
the
gayety
planned
by
members
of
the
Thrift
Shop
Committee
for
May
6
at
Philmont
Country
Club
.
The
women
have
a
reputation
for
giving
parties
that
are
different
and
are
fun
and
this
year's
promises
to
follow
in
this
fine
tradition
.
Mrs.
H.
J.
Grinsfelder
is
chairman
.
The
Louisiana
city
is
known
,
of
course
,
for
its
fine
food
,
good
music
and
its
colorful
hospitality
``
and
,
when
guests
arrive
at
Philmont
that
night
''
,
says
Mrs.
Grinsfelder
,
``
that
is
exactly
what
we
expect
to
offer
them
.
We've
been
working
for
weeks
.
The
prospects
look
great
.
We
are
keeping
a
number
of
surprises
under
our
hats
.
But
we
can't
tell
it
all
now
and
then
have
no
new
excitement
later
''
.
Basin
Street
Beat
But
she
does
indicate
festivities
will
start
early
,
that
a
jazz
combo
will
``
give
with
the
Basin
Street
beat
''
during
the
cocktail
and
dinner
hours
and
that
Lester
Lanin's
orchestra
will
take
over
during
the
dancing
.
As
for
food
,
Mrs.
Henry
Louchheim
,
chairman
of
this
phase
,
is
a
globetrotter
who
knows
good
food
.
``
New
Orleans
''
?
?
She
says
,
``
of
course
I've
had
the
best
.
It
is
just
bad
luck
that
we
are
having
the
party
in
a
month
with
no
R's
,
so
no
oysters
.
But
we
have
lots
of
other
New
Orleans
specialties
.
I
know
they
will
be
good
.
We've
tried
them
out
on
the
club
chef
--
or
say
,
he
has
tried
them
out
on
us
and
we
have
selected
the
best
''
.
Scenic
effects
Guests
will
be
treated
to
Gulf
Coast
scenic
effects
.
There
will
be
masses
of
flowers
,
reproductions
of
the
handsome
old
buildings
with
their
grillwork
and
other
things
that
are
typical
of
New
Orleans
.
Mrs.
Harry
K.
Cohen
is
chairman
of
this
phase
and
she
is
getting
an
artistic
assist
from
A.
Van
Hollander
,
display
director
of
Gimbel
Brothers
.
The
gala
is
the
Thrift
Shop's
annual
bundle
party
and
,
as
all
Thrift
Shop
friends
know
,
that
means
the
admission
is
a
bundle
of
used
clothing
in
good
condition
,
contributions
of
household
equipment
,
bric-a-brac
and
such
to
stock
the
shelves
at
the
shop's
headquarters
at
1213
Walnut
St.
.
Bundle
centers
For
the
convenience
of
guests
bundle
centers
have
been
established
throughout
the
city
and
suburbs
where
the
donations
may
be
deposited
between
now
and
the
date
of
the
big
event
.
In
addition
to
the
bundles
,
guests
pay
the
cost
of
their
dinners
.
Members
of
the
young
set
who
would
like
to
come
to
the
party
only
during
the
dancing
time
are
welcomed
.
The
Thrift
Shop
,
with
Mrs.
Bernhard
S.
Blumenthal
as
president
,
is
one
of
the
city's
most
successful
fund-raisers
for
the
Federation
of
Jewish
Agencies
.
Some
idea
of
the
competence
of
the
women
is
indicated
in
the
contribution
made
by
them
during
the
past
25
years
that
totals
$840,000
.
It's
big
business
``
Big
business
,
this
little
Thrift
Shop
business
''
,
say
the
members
.
For
most
of
the
25
years
the
operation
was
under
feminine
direction
.
In
the
past
few
years
the
men
,
mostly
husbands
of
members
,
have
taken
an
interest
.
Louis
Glazer
is
chairman
of
the
men's
committee
that
,
among
other
jobs
,
takes
over
part
of
the
responsibility
for
staffing
the
shop
during
its
evening
hours
.
Mrs.
Theodore
Kapnek
is
vice
chairman
of
the
committee
for
the
gala
.
Mrs.
Richard
Newburger
is
chairman
of
hostesses
.
Mrs.
Arthur
Loeb
is
making
arrangements
for
a
reception
;
;
Mrs.
Joan
Lichtenstein
,
for
publicity
;
;
Mrs.
Harry
M.
Rose
,
Jr.
,
for
secretarial
duties
;
;
Mrs.
Ralph
Taussig
,
for
junior
aides
;
;
Mr.
and
Mrs.
B.
Lewis
Kaufnabb
,
for
senior
aides
,
and
Mrs.
Samuel
P.
Weinberg
,
for
the
bundles
.
In
addition
,
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Allan
Goodman
are
controllers
,
Mrs.
Paul
Stone
is
treasurer
and
Mrs.
Albert
Quell
is
in
charge
of
admittance
for
the
dancing
at
9
P.m.
.
Besides
the
bundle
centers
where
contributions
may
be
made
there
will
be
facilities
at
Philmont
Country
Club
for
those
who
would
like
to
bring
the
bundles
on
the
night
of
the
party
.
The
women's
committee
of
St.
David's
Church
will
hold
its
annual
pre-Fair
pink
parade
,
a
dessert
bridge
and
fashion
show
at
1
p.m.
on
Monday
,
April
17
,
in
the
chapel
assembly
room
,
Wayne
.
Mrs.
Robert
O.
Spurdle
is
chairman
of
the
committee
,
which
includes
Mrs.
James
A.
Moody
,
Mrs.
Frank
C.
Wilkinson
,
Mrs.
Ethel
Coles
,
Mrs.
Harold
G.
Lacy
,
Mrs.
Albert
W.
Terry
,
Mrs.
Henry
M.
Chance
,
2d
,
Mrs.
Robert
O.
Spurdle
,
Jr.
,
Mrs.
Harcourt
N.
Trimble
,
Jr.
,
Mrs.
John
A.
Moller
,
Mrs.
Robert
Zeising
,
Mrs.
William
G.
Kilhour
,
Mrs.
Hughes
Cauffman
,
Mrs.
John
L.
Baringer
and
Mrs.
Clyde
Newman
.
The
fashion
show
,
by
Natalie
Collett
will
have
Mrs.
John
Newbold
as
commentator
.
Models
will
be
Mrs.
Samuel
B.
D.
Baird
,
Mrs.
William
H.
Meyle
,
Jr.
,
Mrs.
Richard
W.
Hole
,
Mrs.
William
F.
Harrity
,
Mrs.
Robert
O.
Spurdle
,
Mrs.
E.
H.
Kloman
,
Mrs.
Robert
W.
Wolcott
,
Jr.
,
Mrs.
Frederick
C.
Wheeler
,
Jr.
,
Mrs.
William
A
Boyd
,
Mrs
F.
Vernon
Putt
.
Col.
Clifton
Lisle
,
of
Chester
Springs
,
who
headed
the
Troop
Committee
for
much
of
its
second
and
third
decades
,
is
now
an
honorary
member
.
Each
year
he
invites
the
boys
to
camp
out
on
his
estate
for
one
of
their
big
week
ends
of
the
year
.
The
Troop
is
proud
of
its
camping-out
program
--
on
year-round
schedule
and
was
continued
even
when
sub-zero
temperatures
were
registered
during
the
past
winter
.
``
We
worry
''
,
say
the
mothers
.
``
But
there
never
is
any
need
.
The
boys
love
it
''
.
Mrs.
John
Charles
Cotty
is
chairman
of
publicity
for
the
country
fair
and
Mrs.
Francis
G.
Felske
and
Mrs.
Francis
Smythe
,
of
posters
.
They
all
are
of
Wayne
.
``
Meet
the
Artist
''
is
the
invitation
issued
by
members
of
the
Greater
Philadelphia
Section
of
the
National
Council
of
Jewish
Women
as
they
arrange
for
an
annual
exhibit
and
sale
of
paintings
and
sculpture
at
the
Philmont
Country
Club
on
April
8
and
9
.
A
preview
party
for
sponsors
of
the
event
and
for
the
artists
is
set
for
April
8
.
The
event
will
be
open
to
the
public
the
following
day
.
Proceeds
will
be
used
by
the
section
to
further
its
program
in
science
,
education
and
social
action
on
local
,
national
and
international
levels
.
Noted
artist
Mrs.
Monte
Tyson
,
chairman
,
says
the
work
of
100
artists
well
known
in
the
Delaware
Valley
area
will
be
included
in
the
exhibition
and
sale
.
Among
them
will
be
Marc
Shoettle
,
Ben
Shahn
,
Nicholas
Marsicano
,
Alfred
Van
Loen
and
Milton
Avery
.
Mr.
Shoettle
has
agreed
to
do
a
portrait
of
the
family
of
the
person
who
wins
the
door
prize
.
The
event
is
the
sixth
on
the
annual
calendar
of
the
local
members
of
the
National
Council
of
Jewish
Women
.
It
originated
with
the
Wissahickon
Section
.
When
this
and
other
units
combined
to
form
the
present
group
,
it
was
taken
on
as
a
continuing
fund-raiser
.
Others
assisting
Mrs.
Jerome
Blum
and
Mrs.
Meyer
Schultz
are
co-chairmen
this
year
.
Assisting
as
chairmen
of
various
committees
are
Mrs.
Alvin
Blum
,
Mrs.
Leonard
Malmud
,
Mrs.
Edward
Fernberger
,
Mrs.
Robert
Cushman
.
Also
Mrs.
Berton
Korman
,
Mrs.
Morton
Rosen
,
Mrs.
Jacques
Zinman
,
Mrs.
Evelyn
Rosen
,
Mrs.
Henry
Schultz
,
Mr.
and
Mrs.
I.
S.
Kamens
,
Mrs.
Jack
Langsdorf
,
Mrs.
Leonard
Liss
,
Mrs.
Gordon
Blumberg
,
Mrs.
Oscar
Bregman
,
Mrs.
Alfred
Kershbaum
and
Mrs.
Edward
Sabol
.
Dr.
and
Mrs.
N.
Volney
Ludwick
have
had
as
guests
Mr.
and
Mrs.
John
J.
Evans
,
Jr.
,
of
``
Kimbolton
House
''
,
Rockhall
,
Md.
.
Mrs.
Edward
App
will
entertain
the
members
of
her
Book
Club
on
Tuesday
.
Mrs.
A.
Voorhees
Anderson
entertained
at
a
luncheon
at
her
home
,
on
Monday
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Anderson
were
entertained
at
dinner
on
Sunday
by
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Frank
Coulson
,
of
Fairless
Hills
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Major
Morris
and
their
son-in-law
and
daughter
,
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Thomas
Glennon
,
and
their
children
will
spend
several
days
in
Brigantine
,
N.
J.
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
James
Janssen
announce
the
birth
of
a
daughter
,
Patricia
Lynn
Janssen
,
on
March
2
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Charles
Marella
announce
the
engagement
of
their
daughter
,
Miss
Mary
Ann
Marella
,
to
Mr.
Robert
L.
Orcutt
,
son
of
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Donald
R.
Orcutt
,
of
Drexel
Hill
.
Miss
Eileen
Grant
is
spending
several
weeks
visiting
in
Florida
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Frederick
Heinze
are
entertaining
Mr.
Walter
Lehner
,
of
Vienna
;
;
Mr.
Ingo
Dussa
,
of
Dusseldorf
,
Germany
,
and
Mr.
Bietnar
Haaek
,
of
Brelin
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Harry
D.
Hoaps
,
Jr.
have
returned
to
their
home
in
Drexel
Park
,
after
spending
some
time
in
Delray
Beach
Fla.
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
James
F.
Mitchell
,
with
their
daughter
,
Anne
,
and
son
,
James
,
Jr.
are
spending
several
weeks
in
Florida
,
and
will
visit
in
Clearwater
.
Cmdr.
Warren
Taylor
,
USN.
,
and
Mrs.
Taylor
,
of
E.
Greenwich
,
R.
I.
,
will
have
with
them
for
the
Easter
holidays
the
latter's
parents
,
Mr.
and
Mrs.
John
B.
Walbridge
,
of
Drexel
Hill
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
L.
DeForest
Emmert
,
formerly
of
Drexel
Hill
,
and
now
of
Newtown
Square
,
are
entertaining
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Ashman
E.
Emmert
,
of
Temple
,
Pa.
.
Mrs.
William
H.
Merner
,
of
Drexel
Park
,
entertained
at
a
luncheon
at
her
home
on
Wednesday
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Robert
Brown
will
return
next
week
from
Bermuda
.
Mrs.
H.
E.
Godwin
will
entertain
the
members
of
her
Book
Club
at
her
home
on
Tuesday
.
Dr.
and
Mrs.
Richard
Peter
Vieth
announce
the
engagement
of
their
daughter
,
Miss
Susan
Ann
Vieth
,
to
Mr.
Conrad
Wall
3
,
,
son
of
Dr.
Conrad
Wall
2
,
,
and
Mrs.
Nell
Kennedy
Wall
.
The
marriage
will
be
quietly
celebrated
in
early
February
.
Miss
Vieth
was
graduated
from
the
Louise
S.
McGehee
school
and
is
attending
Wellesley
College
in
Wellesley
,
Mass.
.
Her
mother
is
the
former
Miss
Stella
Hayward
.
Mr.
Wall
is
a
student
at
Tulane
university
,
where
he
is
a
member
of
Delta
Kappa
Epsilon
fraternity
.
Their
Majesties
,
The
Queen
of
Carnival
and
The
Queen
of
Comus
,
have
jointly
issued
invitations
for
Shrove
Tuesday
evening
at
midnight
at
which
time
they
will
entertain
in
the
grand
ballroom
of
a
downtown
hotel
following
the
balls
of
Rex
and
Comus
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Richard
B.
McConnell
and
their
son-in-law
and
daughter
,
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Raymond
B.
Walker
will
be
hosts
this
Tuesday
evening
at
dinner
at
the
State
St.
home
of
the
Walkers
honoring
Mrs.
McConnell's
debutante
niece
,
Miss
Barbara
Williams
.
Debutante
Miss
Lady
Helen
Hardy
will
be
feted
at
luncheon
this
Tuesday
at
which
the
hostess
will
be
Mrs.
Edwin
Socola
of
Waveland
,
Miss.
.
She
will
entertain
at
a
Vieux
Carre
restaurant
at
1
o'clock
in
the
early
afternoon
.
Another
debutante
,
Miss
Virginia
Richmond
,
will
also
be
the
honoree
this
Wednesday
at
luncheon
at
which
Mrs.
John
Dane
,
will
be
hostess
entertaining
at
a
downtown
hotel
.
Miss
Katherine
Vickery
,
who
attends
Sweet
Briar
College
in
Virginia
,
will
rejoin
her
father
,
Dr.
Eugene
Vickery
,
at
the
family
home
in
Richmond
pl.
Wednesday
for
part
of
the
Carnival
festivities
.
When
the
Achaeans
entertained
Wednesday
last
at
their
annual
Carnival
masquerade
ball
,
Miss
Margaret
Pierson
was
chosen
to
rule
over
the
festivities
,
presented
at
the
Muncipal
Auditorium
and
chosen
as
her
ladies
in
waiting
were
Misses
Clayton
Nairne
,
Eleanor
Eustis
,
Lynn
Chapman
,
Irwin
Leatherman
of
Robinsonville
,
Miss.
and
Helene
Rowley
.
The
large
municipal
hall
was
ablaze
with
color
,
which
shown
out
from
the
bright
array
of
chic
ballgowns
worn
by
those
participating
in
the
``
maskers'
dances
''
.
The
mother
of
young
queen
,
Mrs.
G.
Henry
Pierson
Jr.
chose
a
white
brocade
gown
made
on
slim
lines
with
panels
of
tomato-red
and
bright
green
satin
extending
down
the
back
.
Mrs.
Thomas
Jordan
selected
a
black
taffeta
frock
made
with
a
skirt
of
fringed
tiers
and
worn
with
crimson
silk
slippers
.
Mrs.
Clayton
Nairne
,
whose
daughter
,
was
among
the
court
maids
,
chose
a
deep
greenish
blue
lace
gown
.
Mrs.
Fenwick
Eustis
,
whose
daughter
was
also
a
maid
to
the
queen
,
wore
an
ashes
of
roses
slipper
satin
gown
.
Mrs.
Peter
Feringa
Jr.
,
last
year's
Achaeans'
queen
,
chose
an
eggshell
white
filmy
lace
short
dress
made
with
a
wide
decolletage
trimmed
with
an
edging
of
tulle
.
Mrs.
Eustis
Reily's
olive-green
street
length
silk
taffeta
dress
was
embroidered
on
the
bodice
with
gold
threads
and
golden
sequins
and
beads
.
The
Baltimore
and
Ohio
Railroad
announced
yesterday
it
would
reduce
the
total
amount
of
its
payroll
by
10
per
cent
through
salary
cuts
and
lay-offs
effective
at
12:01
A.M.
next
Saturday
.
The
current
monthly
payroll
comes
to
about
$15,000,000
.
Howard
E.
Simpson
,
the
railroad's
president
,
said
,
``
A
drastic
decline
in
freight
loading
due
principally
to
the
severe
slump
in
the
movement
of
heavy
goods
has
necessitated
this
regrettable
action
''
.
The
reduction
in
expenses
will
affect
employees
in
the
thirteen
states
in
which
the
B.
&
O.
operates
.
Salary
cut
and
lay-offs
It
will
be
accomplished
in
two
ways
:
1
A
flat
reduction
of
10
per
cent
in
the
salary
of
all
officers
,
supervisors
and
other
employees
not
belonging
to
unions
.
There
are
about
3,325
officers
and
employees
in
this
class
.
2
Sufficient
lay-offs
of
union
employees
to
bring
about
a
10
per
cent
cut
in
the
union
payroll
expense
.
Since
the
railroad
cannot
reduce
the
salary
of
individual
union
members
under
contract
,
it
must
accomplish
its
payroll
reduction
by
placing
some
of
the
men
on
furlough
,
a
B.
&
O.
spokesman
said
.
Those
union
members
kept
on
their
jobs
,
therefore
,
will
not
take
a
cut
in
their
wages
.
The
spokesman
said
the
number
to
be
furloughed
cannot
be
estimated
since
the
lay-offs
must
be
carried
out
in
each
area
depending
on
what
men
are
most
needed
on
the
job
.
A
thug
struck
a
cab
driver
in
the
face
with
a
pistol
last
night
after
robbing
him
of
$18
at
Franklin
and
Mount
Streets
.
The
victim
,
Norman
B.
Wiley
,
38
,
of
the
900
block
North
Charles
Street
,
was
treated
for
cuts
at
Franklin
Square
Hospital
after
the
robbery
.
The
driver
told
police
he
followed
as
the
Negro
man
got
out
of
the
cab
with
his
money
.
The
victim
was
beaten
when
he
attempted
to
stop
the
bandit
.
He
said
the
assailant
,
who
was
armed
with
a
automatic
,
entered
the
taxi
at
Pennsylvania
Avenue
and
Gold
Street
.
In
another
attack
,
Samuel
Verstandig
,
41
,
proprietor
of
a
food
store
in
the
2100
block
Aiken
Street
,
told
police
two
Negroes
assaulted
him
in
his
store
and
stole
$150
from
the
cash
register
after
choking
and
beating
him
.
A
baby
was
burned
to
death
and
two
other
children
were
seriously
injured
last
night
in
a
fire
which
damaged
their
one-room
Anne
Arundel
county
home
.
The
victim
Darnell
Somerville
,
Negro
,
1
,
was
pronounced
dead
on
arrival
at
Anne
Arundel
General
Hospital
in
Annapolis
.
His
sister
and
brother
,
Marie
Louise
,
3
,
and
John
Raymond
,
Jr.
22
months
,
were
admitted
to
the
hospital
.
The
girl
was
in
critical
condition
with
burns
over
90
per
cent
of
her
body
.
Boy
in
fair
condition
The
boy
received
second-degree
burns
of
the
face
,
neck
and
back
.
His
condition
was
reported
to
be
fair
.
Police
said
the
children's
mother
,
Mrs.
Eleanor
Somerville
,
was
visiting
next
door
when
the
fire
occurred
.
The
house
is
on
Old
Annapolis
road
a
mile
south
of
Severna
Park
,
at
Jones
Station
,
police
said
.
Annapolis
,
Jan.
7
--
The
Anne
Arundel
county
school
superintendent
has
asked
that
the
Board
of
Education
return
to
the
practice
of
recording
its
proceedings
mechanically
so
that
there
will
be
no
more
question
about
who
said
what
.
The
proposal
was
made
by
Dr.
David
S.
Jenkins
after
he
and
Mrs.
D.
Ellwood
Williams
,
Jr.
,
a
board
member
and
long-time
critic
of
the
superintendent
,
argued
for
about
fifteen
minutes
at
this
week's
meeting
.
The
disagreement
was
over
what
Dr.
Jenkins
had
said
at
a
previous
session
and
how
his
remarks
appeared
in
the
minutes
presented
at
the
following
meeting
.
Cites
discrepancies
Mrs.
Williams
had
a
list
which
she
said
contained
about
nine
or
ten
discrepancies
between
her
memory
of
Dr.
Jenkins's
conversation
and
how
they
were
written
up
for
the
board's
approval
.
``
I
hate
to
have
these
things
come
up
again
and
again
''
,
Dr.
Jenkins
commented
as
he
made
his
suggestion
.
``
These
are
the
board's
minutes
.
I'll
write
what
you
tell
me
to
''
.
For
a
number
of
years
the
board
used
a
machine
to
keep
a
permanent
record
but
abandoned
the
practice
about
two
years
ago
.
It
was
about
that
time
,
a
board
member
said
later
,
that
Dr.
Thomas
G.
Pullen
,
Jr.
,
State
superintendent
of
schools
,
told
Dr.
Jenkins
and
a
number
of
other
education
officials
that
he
would
not
talk
to
them
with
a
recording
machine
sitting
in
front
of
him
.
The
Board
of
County
Commissioners
,
the
Sanitary
Commission
,
the
Planning
and
Zoning
Board
and
other
county
official
bodies
use
recording
machines
for
all
public
business
in
order
to
prevent
law
suits
and
other
misunderstandings
about
what
actually
happened
at
their
meetings
.
Dr.
Jenkins
notes
,
however
,
that
most
of
the
school
boards
in
the
State
do
not
do
so
.
State
Senator
Joseph
A.
Bertorelli
(
D.
,
First
Baltimore
)
had
a
stroke
yesterday
while
in
his
automobile
in
the
200
block
of
West
Pratt
Street
.
He
was
taken
to
University
Hospital
in
a
municipal
ambulance
.
Doctors
at
the
hospital
said
he
was
partially
paralyzed
on
the
right
side
.
His
condition
was
said
to
be
,
``
fair
''
.
Police
said
he
became
ill
while
parked
in
front
of
a
barber
shop
at
229
West
Pratt
Street
.
Barber
summoned
He
called
Vincent
L.
Piraro
,
proprietor
of
the
shop
,
who
summoned
police
and
an
ambulance
.
The
vice
president
of
the
City
Council
complained
yesterday
that
there
are
``
deficiencies
''
in
the
city's
snow
clearing
program
which
should
be
corrected
as
soon
as
possible
.
Councilman
William
D.
Schaefer
(
D.
,
Fifth
)
said
in
a
letter
to
Mayor
Grady
that
plowing
and
salting
crews
should
be
dispatched
earlier
in
storms
and
should
be
kept
on
the
job
longer
than
they
were
last
month
.
Werner
criticized
Conceding
that
several
cities
to
the
north
were
in
worse
shape
than
Baltimore
after
the
last
storm
,
Mr.
Schaefer
listed
several
improvements
he
said
should
be
made
in
the
snow
plan
here
.
He
said
the
snow
plan
was
put
in
effect
too
slowly
in
December
.
Equipment
should
be
in
operation
``
almost
immediately
after
the
first
snowfall
''
,
Mr.
Schaefer
said
.
The
Councilman
,
who
is
the
Administration
floor
leader
,
also
criticized
Bernard
L.
Werner
,
public
works
director
,
for
``
halting
snow
operations
''
on
Tuesday
night
after
the
Sunday
storm
.
Sent
home
for
rest
Mr.
Werner
said
yesterday
that
operations
continued
through
the
week
.
What
he
did
,
Mr.
Werner
said
,
was
let
manual
laborers
go
home
Tuesday
night
for
some
rest
.
Work
resumed
Wednesday
,
he
said
.
Mr.
Schaefer
also
recommended
that
the
snow
emergency
route
plan
,
under
which
parking
is
banned
on
key
streets
and
cars
are
required
to
use
snow
tires
or
chains
on
them
,
should
be
``
strictly
enforced
''
.
Admitting
that
main
streets
and
the
central
business
district
should
have
priority
,
the
Councilman
said
it
is
also
essential
that
small
shopping
areas
``
not
be
overlooked
if
our
small
merchants
are
to
survive
''
.
Recounting
personal
observations
of
clearance
work
,
the
Councilman
cited
instances
of
inefficient
use
of
equipment
or
supplies
by
poorly
trained
workers
and
urged
that
plow
blades
be
set
so
they
do
not
leave
behind
a
thin
layer
of
snow
which
eventually
freezes
.
Annapolis
,
Jan.
7
(
special
)
--
The
15-year-old
adopted
son
of
a
Washington
attorney
and
his
wife
,
who
were
murdered
early
today
in
their
Chesapeake
Bay-front
home
,
has
been
sent
to
Spring
Grove
State
Hospital
for
detention
.
The
victims
were
H.
Malone
Dresbach
,
47
,
and
his
wife
,
Shirley
,
46
.
Each
had
been
shot
in
the
back
several
times
with
a
automatic
rifle
,
according
to
Capt.
Elmer
Hagner
,
chief
of
Anne
Arundel
detectives
.
Judge
Benjamin
Michaelson
signed
the
order
remanding
the
boy
to
the
hospital
because
of
the
lack
of
juvenile
accommodations
at
the
Anne
Arundel
County
Jail
.
The
Circuit
Court
jurist
said
the
boy
will
have
a
hearing
in
Juvenile
Court
.
Younger
son
calls
police
Soon
after
10
A.M.
,
when
police
reached
the
1-1/2-story
brick
home
in
the
Franklin
Manor
section
,
15
miles
south
of
here
on
the
bay
,
in
response
to
a
call
from
the
Dresbach's
other
son
,
Lee
,
14
,
they
found
Mrs.
Dresbach's
body
on
the
first-floor
bedroom
floor
.
Her
husband
was
lying
on
the
kitchen
floor
,
police
said
.
The
younger
son
told
police
his
brother
had
run
from
the
house
after
the
shootings
and
had
driven
away
in
their
mother's
car
.
The
description
of
the
car
was
immediately
broadcast
throughout
Southern
Maryland
on
police
radio
.
Two
brothers
adopted
Police
said
the
boys
are
natural
brothers
and
were
adopted
as
small
children
by
the
Dresbachs
.
Trooper
J.
A.
Grzesiak
spotted
the
wanted
car
,
with
three
boys
,
at
a
Route
2
service
station
,
just
outside
Annapolis
.
The
driver
admitted
he
was
the
Dresbachs'
son
and
all
three
were
taken
to
the
Edgewater
Station
,
police
said
.
Annapolis
,
Jan.
7
--
Governor
Tawes
today
appointed
Lloyd
L.
Simpkins
,
his
administrative
assistant
,
as
Maryland's
Secretary
of
State
.
Mr.
Simpkins
will
move
into
the
post
being
vacated
by
Thomas
B.
Finan
,
earlier
named
Attorney
General
to
succeed
C.
Ferdinand
Sybert
,
who
will
be
elevated
to
an
associate
judgeship
on
the
Maryland
Court
of
Appeals
.
Governor
Tawes
announced
that
a
triple
swearing-in
ceremony
will
be
held
in
his
office
next
Friday
.
Simpkins
from
Somerset
Mr.
Simpkins
is
a
resident
of
Somerset
county
,
and
he
and
the
Governor
,
also
a
Somerset
countian
,
have
been
friends
since
Mr.
Simpkins
was
a
child
.
Now
38
,
Mr.
Simpkins
was
graduated
from
the
University
of
Maryland's
College
of
Agriculture
in
1947
.
Five
years
later
,
he
was
awarded
the
university's
degree
in
law
.
Mr.
Simpkins
made
a
name
for
himself
as
a
member
of
the
House
of
Delegates
from
1951
through
1958
.
From
the
outset
of
his
first
term
,
he
established
himself
as
one
of
the
guiding
spirits
of
the
House
of
Delegates
.
Maryland
contracts
for
future
construction
during
October
totaled
$77,389,000
,
up
to
10
per
cent
compared
to
October
,
1960
,
F.
W.
Dodge
,
Dodge
Corporation
,
reported
.
Dodge
reported
the
following
breakdown
:
Nonresidential
at
$20,447,000
,
down
28
per
cent
;
;
residential
at
$47,101,000
,
up
100
per
cent
;
;
and
heavy
engineering
at
$9,841,000
,
down
45
per
cent
.
The
cumulative
total
of
construction
contracts
for
the
first
ten
months
of
1961
amounted
to
$634,517,000
,
a
4
per
cent
increase
compared
to
the
corresponding
period
of
last
year
.
A
breakdown
of
the
ten-month
total
showed
:
Nonresidential
at
$253,355,000
,
up
22
per
cent
;
;
residential
at
$278,877,000
,
up
12
per
cent
;
;
and
heavy
engineering
at
$102,285,000
,
down
33
per
cent
.
Residential
building
consists
of
houses
,
apartments
,
hotels
,
dormitories
and
other
buildings
designed
for
shelter
.
The
share
of
the
new
housing
market
enjoyed
by
apartments
,
which
began
about
six
years
ago
,
has
more
than
tripled
within
that
span
of
time
.
In
1961
,
it
is
estimated
that
multiple
unit
dwellings
will
account
for
nearly
30
per
cent
of
the
starts
in
residential
construction
.
While
availability
of
mortgage
money
has
been
a
factor
in
encouraging
apartment
construction
,
the
generally
high
level
of
prosperity
in
the
past
few
years
plus
rising
consumer
income
are
among
the
factors
that
have
encouraged
builders
to
concentrate
in
the
apartment-building
field
.
Although
economic
and
personal
circumstances
vary
widely
among
those
now
choosing
apartments
,
Leo
J.
Pantas
,
vice
president
of
a
hardware
manufacturing
company
,
pointed
out
recently
that
many
apartment
seekers
seem
to
have
one
characteristic
in
common
:
a
desire
for
greater
convenience
and
freedom
from
the
problems
involved
in
maintaining
a
house
.
Convenience
held
key
``
Convenience
is
therefore
the
key
to
the
housing
market
today
.
Trouble-free
,
long-life
,
quality
components
will
play
an
increasingly
important
part
in
the
merchandising
of
new
housing
in
1960
''
,
Pantas
predicted
.
Sixty-seven
living
units
are
being
added
to
the
165-unit
Harbor
View
Apartments
in
the
Cherry
Hill
section
.
Ultimately
the
development
will
comprise
300
units
,
in
two-story
and
three-story
structures
.
Various
of
the
apartments
are
of
the
terrace
type
,
being
on
the
ground
floor
so
that
entrance
is
direct
.
Others
,
which
are
reached
by
walking
up
a
single
flight
of
stairs
,
have
balconies
.
The
structures
housing
the
apartments
are
of
masonry
and
frame
construction
.
Heating
is
by
individual
gas-fired
,
forced
warm
air
systems
.
Construction
in
1962
will
account
for
about
15
per
cent
of
the
gross
national
product
,
according
to
a
study
by
Johns-Manville
Corporation
.
London
,
Feb.
9
--
Vital
secrets
of
Britain's
first
atomic
submarine
,
the
Dreadnought
,
and
,
by
implication
,
of
the
entire
United
States
navy's
still-building
nuclear
sub
fleet
,
were
stolen
by
a
London-based
soviet
spy
ring
,
secret
service
agents
testified
today
.
The
Dreadnought
was
built
on
designs
supplied
by
the
United
States
in
1959
and
was
launched
last
year
.
It
is
a
killer
sub
--
that
is
,
a
hunter
of
enemy
subs
.
It
has
a
hull
patterned
on
that
of
the
United
States
navy's
Nautilus
,
the
world's
first
atomic
submarine
.
Its
power
unit
,
however
,
was
derived
from
the
reactor
of
the
more
modern
American
nuclear
submarine
Skipjack
.
Five
held
for
trial
The
announcement
that
the
secrets
of
the
Dreadnought
had
been
stolen
was
made
in
Bow
St.
police
court
here
at
the
end
of
a
three
day
hearing
.
A
full
trial
was
ordered
for
:
Two
British
civil
servants
,
Miss
Ethel
Gee
,
46
,
and
her
newly
devoted
friend
,
Harry
Houghton
,
55
,
and
divorced
.
They
are
accused
of
whisking
secrets
out
of
naval
strongrooms
over
which
they
kept
guard
.
Gordon
A.
Lonsdale
,
37
,
a
mystery
man
presumed
to
be
Russian
although
he
carries
a
Canadian
passport
.
When
arrested
,
he
had
the
submarine
secrets
on
a
roll
of
candid
camera
film
as
well
as
anti-submarine
secrets
in
Christmas
gift
wrapping
,
it
was
testified
.
Flashed
to
Moscow
A
shadowy
couple
who
call
themselves
Peter
Kroger
,
bookseller
,
and
wife
,
Joyce
.
(
In
Washington
,
the
Federal
Bureau
of
Investigation
identified
the
Krogers
as
Morris
and
Lola
Cohen
,
an
American
couple
formerly
of
New
York
City
)
.
In
their
suburban
cottage
the
crown
charges
,
the
Krogers
received
secrets
from
the
mystery
man
,
usually
on
the
first
Saturday
evening
of
each
month
,
and
spent
much
of
the
week-end
getting
the
secrets
off
to
Moscow
,
either
on
a
powerful
transmitter
buried
under
the
kitchen
floor
or
as
dots
posted
over
period
marks
in
used
books
.
Each
dot
on
magnification
resumed
its
original
condition
as
a
drawing
,
a
printed
page
,
or
a
manuscript
.
All
five
pleaded
innocent
.
Only
Miss
Gee
asked
for
bail
.
Her
young
British
lawyer
,
James
Dunlop
,
pleaded
that
she
was
sorely
needed
at
her
Portland
home
by
her
widowed
mother
,
80
,
her
maiden
aunt
,
also
80
and
bedridden
for
20
years
,
and
her
uncle
,
76
,
who
once
ran
a
candy
shop
.
Refuses
to
grant
bail
``
I
am
not
prepared
to
grant
bail
to
any
of
them
''
,
said
the
magistrate
,
K.J.P.
Baraclough
.
The
trial
will
be
held
,
probably
the
first
week
of
March
,
in
the
famous
Old
Bailey
central
criminal
court
where
Klaus
Fuchs
,
the
naturalized
British
German
born
scientist
who
succeeded
in
giving
American
and
British
atomic
bomb
secrets
to
Russia
and
thereby
changed
world
history
during
the
1950s
,
was
sentenced
to
14
years
in
prison
.
Fourteen
years
is
the
maximum
penalty
now
faced
by
the
new
five
,
who
may
have
altered
history
in
the
1960s
.
Fuchs
,
after
nine
and
a
half
years
,
was
released
,
being
given
time
off
for
good
behavior
.
He
promptly
went
to
communist
East
Germany
.
The
magistrate
tonight
refused
to
return
to
the
five
$29,000
in
American
and
British
currency
,
mostly
$20
bills
,
and
in
British
government
bonds
and
stocks
.
``
This
is
Russian
money
''
,
said
Mervin
Griffith-Jones
for
the
attorney
general's
office
.
He
asserted
that
the
Krogers
were
the
bankers
for
Moscow
,
Lonsdale
the
Red
paymaster
,
and
the
two
civil
servants
the
recipients
for
selling
their
country's
secrets
.
``
Of
highest
value
''
The
fact
that
secrets
of
the
Dreadnought
,
and
thereby
of
the
American
undersea
fleet
,
were
involved
in
the
spy
case
had
been
hinted
at
earlier
.
But
just
before
luncheon
today
the
fact
was
announced
grimly
by
the
British
navy's
chief
adviser
to
the
cabinet
on
underwater
warfare
,
Capt.
George
Symonds
.
He
said
that
drawings
of
the
Dreadnought
and
printed
details
about
the
ship
were
found
reproduced
in
an
undeveloped
roll
of
film
taken
from
Lonsdale
when
he
was
arrested
with
the
two
civil
servants
outside
the
Old
Vic
theater
Saturday
afternoon
,
Jan.
7
.
The
information
,
he
said
,
would
have
been
of
the
highest
value
to
a
potential
enemy
.
Court
cleared
Just
how
many
sub
secrets
were
being
handed
over
when
the
ring
,
watched
for
six
months
,
was
broken
remained
untold
.
The
British
defending
lawyers
,
who
today
increased
from
three
to
four
,
demanded
to
know
if
they
could
make
the
information
involved
seem
of
little
value
to
a
jury
,
the
chances
of
their
clients
would
improve
.
So
in
the
name
of
justice
the
magistrate
cleared
the
court
of
all
except
officials
to
allow
the
captain
to
elaborate
for
almost
an
hour
.
Almost
any
information
about
the
Dreadnought
would
also
reveal
secrets
about
the
American
underwater
fleet
.
Britain
began
designing
the
ship
in
1956
but
got
nowhere
until
the
American
government
decided
to
end
a
ban
on
sharing
military
secrets
with
Britain
that
had
been
imposed
after
Fuchs
blabbed
.
The
United
States
offered
to
supply
a
complete
set
of
propelling
equipment
like
that
used
in
the
Skipjack
.
With
the
machinery
went
a
complete
design
for
the
hull
.
The
Skipjack
was
a
second
generation
atomic
sub
,
much
advanced
on
the
Nautilus
and
the
other
four
which
preceded
it
.
Navy's
future
involved
``
Much
of
the
navy's
future
depends
upon
her
''
,
an
American
naval
announcement
said
on
the
Skipjack's
first
arrival
in
British
waters
in
August
,
1959
,
for
exhibition
to
selected
high
officers
at
Portland
underwater
research
station
.
It
was
there
that
the
two
accused
civil
servants
were
at
work
.
``
Her
basic
hull
form
(
a
teardrop
)
and
her
nuclear
power
plant
will
be
used
for
almost
all
new
submarines
,
including
the
potent
Polaris
missile
submarines
''
,
the
statement
went
on
.
The
atom
reactor
,
water
cooled
,
was
the
result
of
almost
a
decade
of
research
at
the
naval
reactors
branch
of
the
atomic
energy
commission
and
Westinghouse
Electric
Corp.
.
Thru
development
,
the
reactor
and
its
steam
turbines
had
been
reduced
greatly
in
size
,
and
also
in
complexity
,
allowing
a
single
propeller
to
be
used
,
the
navy
said
.
The
hull
was
also
a
result
of
almost
a
decade
of
work
.
It
was
first
tried
out
on
a
conventional
submarine
,
the
Albacore
,
in
1954
.
The
Skipjack
became
the
fastest
submarine
ever
built
.
Reputedly
it
could
outrun
,
underwater
,
the
fastest
destroyers
.
It
could
,
reputedly
,
go
70,000
miles
without
refueling
and
stay
down
more
than
a
month
.
It
was
of
the
hunter-killer
type
,
designed
to
seek
out
ships
and
other
submarines
with
its
most
advanced
gear
and
destroy
them
with
torpedoes
.
The
navy
captain
disclosed
also
that
a
list
of
questions
found
in
Miss
Gee's
purse
would
,
if
completed
and
handed
back
,
have
given
the
Kremlin
a
complete
picture
``
of
our
current
anti-submarine
effort
and
would
have
shown
what
we
are
doing
in
research
and
development
for
the
future
''
.
Interested
in
detector
The
spy
ring
also
was
particularly
interested
in
ASDIC
,
the
underwater
equipment
for
detecting
submarines
,
it
was
testified
.
Range
was
a
vital
detail
.
Designs
of
parts
were
sought
.
Six
radiomen
told
how
,
twice
on
two
days
after
the
ring
was
nabbed
,
a
transmitter
near
Moscow
was
heard
calling
,
using
signals
,
times
and
wavelengths
specified
on
codes
found
hidden
in
cigaret
lighters
in
Lonsdale's
apartment
and
the
Krogers'
house
and
also
fastened
to
the
transmitter
lid
.
Oddly
,
the
calls
were
still
heard
11
days
after
the
five
were
arrested
.
The
charge
that
the
federal
indictment
of
three
Chicago
narcotics
detail
detectives
``
is
the
product
of
rumor
,
combined
with
malice
,
and
individual
enmity
''
on
the
part
of
the
federal
narcotics
unit
here
was
made
yesterday
in
their
conspiracy
trial
before
Judge
Joseph
Sam
Perry
in
federal
District
court
.
The
three
--
Miles
J.
Cooperman
,
Sheldon
Teller
,
and
Richard
Austin
--
and
eight
other
defendants
are
charged
in
six
indictments
with
conspiracy
to
violate
federal
narcotic
laws
.
In
his
opening
statement
to
a
jury
of
eight
women
and
four
men
,
Bernard
H.
Sokol
,
attorney
for
the
detectives
,
said
that
evidence
would
show
that
his
clients
were
``
entirely
innocent
''
.
'
had
to
know
peddlers
'
``
When
they
became
members
of
the
city
police
narcotics
unit
''
,
Sokol
said
,
``
they
were
told
they
would
have
to
get
to
know
certain
areas
of
Chicago
in
which
narcotics
were
sold
and
they
would
have
to
get
to
know
people
in
the
narcotics
racket
.
They
,
on
occasion
,
posed
as
addicts
and
peddlers
''
.
Although
federal
and
city
narcotic
agents
sometimes
worked
together
,
Sokol
continued
,
rivalries
developed
when
they
were
``
aiming
at
the
same
criminals
''
.
This
,
he
added
,
brought
about
``
petty
jealousies
''
and
``
petty
personal
grievances
''
.
``
In
the
same
five
year
period
that
the
United
States
says
they
(
the
detectives
)
were
engaged
in
this
conspiracy
''
,
Sokol
continued
,
``
these
three
young
men
received
a
total
of
26
creditable
mentions
and
many
special
compensations
,
and
were
nominated
for
the
Lambert
Tree
award
and
the
mayor's
medal
''
.
No
comments
by
U.S.
In
opening
,
D.
Arthur
Connelly
,
assistant
United
States
attorney
,
read
the
indictment
,
but
made
no
comments
.
Attorneys
for
the
eight
other
defendants
said
only
that
there
was
no
proof
of
their
clients'
guilt
.
Cooperman
and
Teller
are
accused
of
selling
$4,700
worth
of
heroin
to
a
convicted
narcotics
peddler
,
Otis
Sears
,
45
,
of
6934
Indiana
Av.
.
Among
other
acts
,
Teller
and
Austin
are
accused
of
paying
$800
to
Sears
.
The
first
witness
,
Moses
Winston
Mardis
,
5835
Michigan
Av.
,
a
real
estate
agent
and
former
bail
bondsman
,
took
the
stand
after
opening
statements
had
been
made
.
But
court
adjourned
after
he
testified
he
introduced
James
White
and
Jeremiah
Hope
Pullings
,
two
of
the
defendants
,
and
also
introduced
Pullings
to
Jessy
Maroy
,
a
man
mentioned
in
the
indictment
but
not
indicted
.
Buaford
Robinson
,
23
,
of
7026
Stewart
Av.
,
a
CTA
bus
driver
,
was
slugged
and
robbed
last
night
by
a
group
of
youths
at
51st
Street
and
South
Park
Way
.
Robinson
was
treated
at
a
physician's
office
for
a
cut
over
his
left
eyebrow
and
a
possible
sprained
knee
.
His
losses
included
his
money
bag
,
containing
$40
to
$50
and
his
$214
paycheck
.
Robinson
told
Policemen
James
Jones
and
Morgan
Lloyd
of
the
Wabash
Avenue
district
that
10
youths
boarded
his
south
bound
express
bus
in
front
of
Dunbar
Vocational
High
School
,
30th
Street
and
South
Park
Way
,
and
began
``
skylarking
''
.
When
51st
Street
was
reached
,
Robinson
related
,
he
stopped
the
bus
and
told
the
youths
he
was
going
to
call
the
CTA
supervisor
.
As
he
left
the
bus
with
his
money
bag
,
Robinson
added
,
the
largest
youth
accosted
him
,
a
quarrel
ensued
,
and
the
youth
knocked
him
down
.
Then
the
youths
fled
with
his
money
.
Mrs.
Blanche
Dunkel
,
60
,
who
has
spent
25
years
in
the
Dwight
reformatory
for
women
for
the
murder
in
1935
of
her
son-in-law
,
Ervin
Lang
,
then
28
,
appealed
for
a
parole
at
a
hearing
yesterday
before
two
Illinois
pardon
and
parole
board
members
,
John
M.
Bookwalter
and
Joseph
Carpentier
.
She
had
been
sentenced
to
180
years
in
prison
,
but
former
Gov.
Stratton
commuted
her
term
to
75
years
,
making
her
eligible
for
parole
,
as
one
of
his
last
acts
in
office
.
Mrs.
Dunkel
admitted
the
slaying
and
said
that
the
son-in-law
became
her
lover
after
the
death
of
her
daughter
in
1934
.
It
was
when
he
attempted
to
end
the
relationship
that
the
murder
took
place
.
The
son
of
a
wealthy
Evanston
executive
was
fined
$100
yesterday
and
forbidden
to
drive
for
60
days
for
leading
an
Evanston
policeman
on
a
high
speed
chase
over
icy
Evanston
and
Wilmette
streets
Jan.
20
.
The
defendant
,
William
L.
Stickney
3
,
23
,
of
3211
Park
pl.
,
Evanston
,
who
pleaded
guilty
to
reckless
driving
,
also
was
ordered
by
Judge
James
Corcoran
to
attend
the
Evanston
traffic
school
each
Tuesday
night
for
one
month
.
Stickney
is
a
salesman
for
Plee-Zing
,
Inc.
,
2544
Green
Bay
Rd.
,
Evanston
,
a
food
brokerage
and
grocery
chain
firm
,
of
which
his
father
,
William
L.
Jr.
,
is
president
.
Patrolman
James
F.
Simms
said
he
started
in
pursuit
when
he
saw
young
Stickney
speeding
north
in
Stewart
Avenue
at
Central
Street
.
At
Jenks
Street
,
Simms
said
,
the
car
skidded
completely
around
,
just
missed
two
parked
cars
,
and
sped
east
in
Jenks
.
The
car
spun
around
again
,
Simms
said
,
before
Stickney
could
turn
north
in
Prairie
Avenue
,
and
then
violated
two
stop
lights
as
he
traveled
north
into
Wilmette
in
Prairie
.
St.
Johns
,
Mich.
,
April
19
.
--
A
jury
of
seven
men
and
five
women
found
21-year-old
Richard
Pohl
guilty
of
manslaughter
yesterday
in
the
bludgeon
slaying
of
Mrs.
Anna
Hengesbach
.
Pohl
received
the
verdict
without
visible
emotion
.
He
returned
to
his
cell
in
the
county
jail
,
where
he
has
been
held
since
his
arrest
last
July
,
without
a
word
to
his
court-appointed
attorney
,
Jack
Walker
,
or
his
guard
.
Stepson
vindicated
The
verdict
brought
vindication
to
the
dead
woman's
stepson
,
Vincent
Hengesbach
,
54
,
who
was
tried
for
the
same
crime
in
December
,
1958
,
and
released
when
the
jury
failed
to
reach
a
verdict
.
Mrs.
Hengesbach
was
killed
on
Aug.
31
,
1958
.
Hengesbach
has
been
living
under
a
cloud
ever
since
.
When
the
verdict
came
in
against
his
young
neighbor
,
Hengesbach
said
:
``
I
am
very
pleased
to
have
the
doubt
of
suspicion
removed
.
Still
,
I
don't
wish
to
appear
happy
at
somebody
else's
misfortune
''
.
Lives
on
welfare
Hengesbach
,
who
has
been
living
on
welfare
recently
,
said
he
hopes
to
rebuild
the
farm
which
was
settled
by
his
grandfather
in
Westphalia
,
27
miles
southwest
of
here
.
Hengesbach
has
been
living
in
Grand
Ledge
since
his
house
and
barn
were
burned
down
after
his
release
in
1958
.
Pohl
confessed
the
arson
while
being
questioned
about
several
fires
in
the
Westphalia
area
by
State
Police
.
He
also
admitted
killing
Mrs.
Hengesbach
.
However
,
the
confession
,
which
was
the
only
evidence
against
him
,
was
retracted
before
the
trial
.
Charges
in
doubt
Assistant
Prosecutor
Fred
Lewis
,
who
tried
both
the
Hengesbach
and
Pohl
cases
,
said
he
did
not
know
what
would
be
done
about
two
arson
charges
pending
against
Pohl
.
Circuit
Judge
Paul
R.
Cash
did
not
set
a
date
for
sentencing
.
Pohl
could
receive
from
1
to
15
years
in
prison
or
probation
.
Walker
said
he
was
considering
filing
a
motion
for
a
new
trial
which
would
contend
that
the
verdict
was
against
the
weight
of
the
evidence
and
that
there
were
several
errors
in
trial
procedure
.
Locked
in
motel
A
verdict
against
Pohl
came
at
4:05
p.m.
after
almost
13-1/2
hours
of
deliberation
.
The
jury
,
which
was
locked
up
in
a
motel
overnight
,
was
canvassed
at
the
request
of
Walker
after
the
verdict
was
announced
.
The
jury
foreman
,
Mrs.
Olive
Heideman
,
of
rural
Elsie
,
said
that
a
ballot
was
not
even
taken
until
yesterday
morning
and
that
the
first
day
of
deliberation
was
spent
in
going
over
the
evidence
.
She
said
the
jurors
agreed
that
Pohl's
confession
was
valid
.
The
jury
asked
Judge
Cash
to
send
in
his
written
definition
of
the
difference
between
first
and
second-degree
murder
and
manslaughter
.
The
verdict
came
three
hours
later
.
Some
30
spectators
remained
in
the
court
during
the
day
and
were
on
hand
to
hear
the
verdict
read
.
The
trial
had
packed
the
large
courtroom
for
more
than
a
week
.
A
Sterling
Township
family
of
six
surviving
children
,
whose
mother
died
yesterday
as
the
aftermath
to
a
fire
that
also
killed
one
of
the
children
,
found
today
they
had
the
help
of
hundreds
of
neighbors
and
school
friends
.
While
neighbor
women
assumed
some
of
the
dead
mother's
duties
,
fund-raising
events
were
being
planned
by
a
homeowners
association
and
a
student
council
for
the
hard-hit
Henry
Kowalski
family
,
34220
Viceroy
.
Mrs.
Eleanor
Kowalski
,
42
,
died
yesterday
afternoon
in
Holy
Cross
Hospital
of
burns
suffered
in
a
fire
that
followed
a
bottled
gas
explosion
Saturday
night
at
the
flat
of
her
widowed
mother
,
Mrs.
Mary
Pankowski
,
in
the
adjoining
suburb
of
Warren
.
Services
tomorrow
Funeral
services
for
Mrs.
Kowalski
and
her
daughter
,
Christine
,
11
,
who
died
of
burns
at
the
same
hospital
Monday
,
have
been
scheduled
for
10
a.m.
tomorrow
in
St.
Anne's
Catholic
Church
,
31978
Mound
,
in
Warren
.
The
mother
and
daughter
,
who
will
be
buried
side
by
side
in
Mt.
Olivet
Cemetery
,
rested
together
today
in
closed
caskets
at
the
Lyle
Elliott
Funeral
Home
,
31730
Mound
,
Warren
.
Mrs.
Pankowski
,
61
,
remained
in
Holy
Cross
Hospital
as
a
result
of
the
explosion
,
which
occurred
while
Mrs.
Kowalski
fueled
a
cook
stove
in
the
grandmother's
small
upstairs
flat
at
2274
Eight
Mile
Road
East
.
Held
candle
Assistant
Fire
Chief
Chester
Cornell
said
gas
fumes
apparently
were
ignited
by
a
candle
which
one
of
the
three
Kowalski
girls
present
held
for
her
mother
,
because
the
flat
lacked
electricity
.
Christine's
twin
sister
,
Patricia
,
and
Darlene
Kowalski
,
8
,
escaped
with
minor
burns
.
They
are
home
now
with
the
other
Kowalski
children
,
Vicky
,
14
;
;
Dennis
,
6
;
;
Eleanor
,
2
;
;
and
Bernardine
,
1
.
``
All
we
have
left
in
the
world
is
one
another
,
and
we
must
stay
together
the
way
Mother
wanted
''
,
Kowalski
said
in
telling
his
children
of
their
mother's
death
yesterday
afternoon
.
Kowalski
,
a
roofer
who
seldom
worked
last
winter
,
already
was
in
arrears
on
their
recently
purchased
split-level
home
when
the
tragedy
staggered
him
with
medical
and
funeral
bills
.
A135
donated
Neighbor
women
,
such
as
Mrs.
Sidney
Baker
,
2269
Serra
,
Sterling
Township
,
have
been
supplying
the
family
with
meals
and
handling
household
chores
with
Kowalski's
sister-in-law
,
Mrs.
Anna
Kowalski
,
22111
David
,
East
Detroit
.
Another
neighbor
,
Mrs.
Frank
C.
Smith
,
2731
Pall
Mall
,
Sterling
Township
,
surprised
Kowalski
by
coming
to
the
home
yesterday
with
$135
collected
locally
toward
the
$400
funeral
costs
.
John
C.
Houghton
,
president
of
the
Tareytown
Acres
Homeowners
Association
,
followed
that
by
announcing
plans
last
night
for
a
door-to-door
fund
drive
throughout
their
subdivision
on
behalf
of
the
Kowalski
family
.
Students
help
out
Houghton
said
6
p.m.
Friday
had
been
set
for
a
canvass
of
all
480
homes
in
the
subdivision
,
which
is
located
northeast
of
Dequindre
and
14
Mile
Road
East
.
He
said
contributions
also
could
be
mailed
to
Post
Office
Box
553
,
Warren
Village
Station
.
Vicky
Kowalski
meanwhile
learned
that
several
of
her
fellow
students
had
collected
almost
$25
for
her
family
during
the
lunch
hour
yesterday
at
Fuhrmann
Junior
High
School
,
5155
Fourteen
Mile
road
east
.
Principal
Clayton
W.
Pohly
said
he
would
allow
a
further
collection
between
classes
today
,
and
revealed
that
Y-Teen
Club
past
surpluses
had
been
used
to
provide
a
private
hospital
nurse
Monday
for
Mrs.
Kowalski
.
Funds
from
dances
Student
Council
officers
announced
today
the
Kowalski
family
would
be
given
the
combined
proceeds
from
a
school
dance
held
two
weeks
ago
,
and
another
dance
for
Fuhrmann's
770
students
this
Friday
night
.
``
Furhmann's
faculty
is
proud
that
this
has
been
a
spontaneous
effort
,
started
largely
among
the
students
themselves
,
because
of
fondness
for
Vicky
and
sympathy
for
her
entire
family
,
Pohly
said
.
There
also
were
reports
of
a
collection
at
the
County
Line
Elementary
School
,
3505o
Dequindre
,
which
has
been
attended
this
year
by
four
of
the
Kowalski
children
including
Christine
.
Expresses
thanks
Kowalski
has
spoken
but
little
since
the
fire
last
Saturday
.
But
today
he
wanted
to
make
a
public
statement
.
``
I
never
knew
there
were
such
neighbors
and
friends
around
me
and
my
family
.
I
wasn't
sure
there
were
such
people
anywhere
in
the
world
.
I'll
need
more
than
a
single
day
to
find
the
words
to
properly
express
my
thanks
to
them
''
.
An
alert
10-year-old
safety
patrol
boy
was
congratulated
by
police
today
for
his
part
in
obtaining
a
reckless
driving
conviction
against
a
youthful
motorist
.
Patrolman
George
Kimmell
,
of
McClellan
Station
,
said
he
would
recommend
a
special
safety
citation
for
Ralph
Sisk
,
9230
Vernor
east
,
a
third
grader
at
the
Scripps
School
,
for
his
assistance
in
the
case
.
Kimmell
said
he
and
Ralph
were
helping
children
across
Belvidere
at
Kercheval
Monday
afternoon
when
a
car
heading
north
on
Belvidere
stopped
belatedly
inside
the
pedestrian
crosswalk
.
Gets
car
number
Kimmell
ordered
the
driver
to
back
up
,
watched
the
children
safely
across
and
was
approaching
the
car
when
it
suddenly
``
took
off
at
high
speed
''
,
he
said
,
narrowly
missing
him
.
Commandeering
a
passing
car
,
Kimmell
pursued
the
fleeing
vehicle
,
but
lost
it
in
traffic
.
Returning
to
the
school
crossing
,
the
officer
was
informed
by
the
Sisk
boy
that
he
recognized
the
driver
,
a
neighbor
,
and
had
obtained
the
license
number
.
The
motorist
later
was
identified
as
Richard
Sarkees
,
17
,
of
2433
McClellan
,
currently
on
probation
and
under
court
order
not
to
drive
.
Given
15
days
He
was
found
guilty
of
reckless
driving
yesterday
by
Traffic
Judge
George
T.
Murphy
,
who
continued
his
no-driving
probation
for
another
year
and
ordered
him
to
spend
15
days
in
the
Detroit
House
of
Correction
.
The
jail
sentence
is
to
begin
the
day
after
Sarkees
graduates
from
Eastern
High
School
in
June
.
The
long
crisis
in
Laos
appeared
nearing
a
showdown
today
.
Britain
announced
that
it
is
asking
the
Soviet
Union
to
agree
tomorrow
to
an
immediate
cease-fire
.
Help
asked
In
Vientiane
,
the
royal
Laotian
government
decided
today
to
ask
its
``
friends
and
neighbors
''
for
help
in
fighting
what
it
called
a
new
rebel
offensive
threatening
the
southeast
Asian
kingdom
.
Britain's
plans
to
press
Russia
for
a
definite
cease-fire
timetable
was
announced
in
London
by
Foreign
Secretary
Lord
Home
.
He
said
Britain
also
proposed
that
the
international
truce
commission
should
be
reconvened
,
sent
to
New
Delhi
and
from
there
to
Laos
to
verify
the
cease-fire
.
A
14-power
conference
on
Laos
should
then
meet
on
May
5
,
he
said
.
Plea
for
arms
The
Laos
government
plea
for
help
was
made
by
Foreign
Minister
Tiao
Sopsaisana
.
He
indicated
that
requests
would
be
made
for
more
U.S.
arms
and
more
U.S.
military
advisers
.
He
declared
the
government
is
thinking
of
asking
for
foreign
troops
if
the
situation
worsens
.
One
of
the
first
moves
made
after
a
cabinet
decision
was
to
request
the
United
States
to
establish
a
full-fledged
military
assistance
group
instead
of
the
current
civilian
body
.
A
note
making
the
request
was
handed
to
U.S.
Ambassador
Winthrop
G.
Brown
.
Heavy
support
The
Laos
government
said
four
major
Pathet
Lao
rebel
attacks
had
been
launched
,
heavily
supported
by
troops
from
Communist
North
Viet
Nam
.
The
minister
,
describing
the
attacks
which
led
up
to
the
appeal
,
said
that
60,000
Communist
North
Vietnamese
were
fighting
royal
army
troops
on
one
front
--
near
Thakhek
,
in
southern-central
Laos
.
There
was
no
confirmation
of
such
massive
assaults
from
independent
sources
.
In
the
past
such
government
claims
have
been
found
exaggerated
.
Havana
,
April
19
.
--
Two
Americans
and
seven
Cubans
were
executed
by
firing
squads
today
as
Castro
military
tribunals
began
decreeing
the
death
penalty
for
captured
invasion
forces
and
suspected
collaborators
.
A
Havana
radio
broadcast
identified
the
Americans
as
Howard
Anderson
and
August
Jack
McNair
.
The
executions
took
place
at
dawn
only
a
few
hours
after
Havana
radio
announced
their
conviction
by
a
revolutionary
tribunal
at
Pinar
Del
Rio
,
where
the
executions
took
place
.
Arms
plot
charged
The
broadcast
said
Anderson
,
a
Seattle
ex-marine
and
Havana
businessman
,
and
McNair
,
of
Miami
,
were
condemned
on
charges
of
smuggling
arms
to
Cuban
rebels
.
Anderson
operated
three
Havana
automobile
service
stations
and
was
commander
of
the
Havana
American
Legion
post
before
it
disbanded
since
the
start
of
Fidel
Castro's
regime
.
Anderson's
wife
and
four
children
live
in
Miami
.
McNair
,
25
,
was
seized
March
20
with
four
Cubans
and
accused
of
trying
to
land
a
boatload
of
rifles
in
Pinar
Del
Rio
,
about
35
miles
from
Havana
.
Report
others
held
At
least
20
other
Americans
were
reported
to
have
been
arrested
in
a
mass
political
roundup
.
Among
them
were
a
number
of
newsmen
,
including
Henry
Raymont
,
of
United
Press
International
,
and
Robert
Berrellez
,
of
Associated
Press
.
So
many
Cubans
were
reported
being
swept
into
the
Castro
dragnet
that
the
massive
Sports
Palace
auditorium
and
at
least
one
hotel
were
converted
into
makeshift
jails
.
More
than
1,000
were
said
to
have
been
arrested
--
100
of
them
Roman
Catholic
priests
.
Of
the
millions
who
have
served
time
in
concentration
camps
in
Siberia
as
political
prisoners
of
the
Soviet
state
,
few
emerge
in
the
West
to
tell
about
it
.
M.
Kegham
--
the
name
is
a
pseudynom
--
was
a
teacher
in
Bucharest
and
a
member
of
the
Armenian
Revolutionary
Federation
(
ARF
)
--
two
reasons
the
Communists
put
him
away
when
they
arrived
in
1945
.
Today
,
M.
Kegham
was
in
Detroit
,
en
route
to
join
his
wife
and
children
in
California
.
Emory
University's
Board
of
Trustees
announced
Friday
that
it
was
prepared
to
accept
students
of
any
race
as
soon
as
the
state's
tax
laws
made
such
a
step
possible
.
``
Emory
University's
charter
and
by-laws
have
never
required
admission
or
rejection
of
students
on
the
basis
of
race
''
,
board
chairman
Henry
L.
Bowden
stated
.
But
an
official
statement
adopted
by
the
33-man
Emory
board
at
its
annual
meeting
Friday
noted
that
state
taxing
requirements
at
present
are
a
roadblock
to
accepting
Negroes
.
The
statement
explained
that
under
the
Georgia
Constitution
and
state
law
,
tax-exempt
status
is
granted
to
educational
institutions
only
if
they
are
segregated
.
``
Emory
could
not
continue
to
operate
according
to
its
present
standards
as
an
institution
of
higher
learning
,
of
true
university
grade
,
and
meet
its
financial
obligations
,
without
the
tax-exemption
privileges
which
are
available
to
it
only
so
long
as
it
conforms
to
the
aforementioned
constitutional
and
statutory
provisions
''
,
the
statement
said
.
The
statement
did
not
mention
what
steps
might
be
taken
to
overcome
the
legal
obstacles
to
desegregation
.
An
Emory
spokesman
indicated
,
however
,
that
the
university
itself
did
not
intend
to
make
any
test
of
the
laws
.
The
Georgia
Constitution
gives
the
Legislature
the
power
to
exempt
colleges
from
property
taxation
if
,
among
other
criteria
,
``
all
endowments
to
institutions
established
for
white
people
shall
be
limited
to
white
people
,
and
all
endowments
to
institutions
established
for
colored
people
shall
be
limited
to
colored
people
''
.
At
least
two
private
colleges
in
the
Atlanta
area
now
or
in
the
past
have
had
integrated
student
bodies
,
but
their
tax-exempt
status
never
has
been
challenged
by
the
state
.
Emory
is
affiliated
with
the
Methodist
Church
.
Some
church
leaders
,
both
clerical
and
lay
,
have
criticized
the
university
for
not
taking
the
lead
in
desegregation
.
Urged
in
1954
The
student
newspaper
,
The
Emory
Wheel
,
as
early
as
the
fall
of
1954
called
for
desegregation
.
``
From
its
beginning
''
,
the
trustees'
statement
said
Friday
,
``
Emory
University
has
assumed
as
its
primary
commitment
a
dedication
to
excellence
in
Christian
higher
learning
.
Teaching
,
research
and
study
,
according
to
highest
standards
,
under
Christian
influence
,
are
paramount
in
the
Emory
University
policy
.
``
As
a
private
institution
,
supported
by
generous
individuals
,
Emory
University
will
recognize
no
obligation
and
will
adopt
no
policy
that
would
conflict
with
its
purpose
to
promote
excellence
in
scholarship
and
Christian
education
.
``
There
is
not
now
,
nor
has
there
ever
been
in
Emory
University's
charter
or
by-laws
any
requirement
that
students
be
admitted
or
rejected
on
the
basis
of
race
,
color
or
creed
.
Insofar
as
its
own
governing
documents
are
concerned
,
Emory
University
could
now
consider
applications
from
prospective
students
,
and
others
seeking
applications
from
prospective
students
,
and
others
seeking
the
opportunity
to
study
or
work
at
the
university
,
irrespective
of
race
,
color
or
creed
.
Corporate
existence
``
On
the
other
hand
,
Emory
University
derives
its
corporate
existence
from
the
State
of
Georgia
.
``
When
and
if
it
can
do
so
without
jeopardizing
constitutional
and
statutory
tax-exemption
privileges
essential
to
the
maintenance
of
its
educational
program
and
facilities
,
Emory
University
will
consider
applications
of
persons
desiring
to
study
or
work
at
the
University
without
regard
to
race
,
color
or
creed
,
continuing
university
policy
that
all
applications
shall
be
considered
on
the
basis
of
intellectual
and
moral
standards
and
other
criteria
designed
to
assure
the
orderly
and
effective
conduct
of
the
university
and
the
fulfillment
of
its
mission
as
an
institution
of
Christian
higher
education
''
.
A
young
man
was
killed
and
two
others
injured
at
midnight
Friday
when
the
car
they
were
riding
slid
into
a
utility
pole
on
Lake
Avenue
near
Waddell
Street
,
NE
,
police
said
.
The
dead
youth
was
identified
as
Robert
E.
Sims
,
19
,
of
1688
Oak
Knoll
Cir.
,
Aj
.
Patrolman
G.
E.
Hammons
said
the
car
evidently
slid
out
of
control
on
rain-slick
streets
and
slammed
into
the
pole
.
The
other
occupants
were
James
Willard
Olvey
,
18
,
of
963
Ponce
De
Leon
Ave.
,
NE
,
and
Larry
Coleman
Barnett
,
19
,
of
704
Hill
St.
,
SE
,
both
of
whom
were
treated
at
Grady
Hospital
for
severe
lacerations
and
bruises
.
The
Atlanta
Negro
student
movement
renewed
its
demands
for
movie
theater
integration
Friday
and
threatened
picketing
and
``
stand-ins
''
if
negotiations
failed
.
The
demands
were
set
forth
in
letters
to
seven
owners
of
first-run
theaters
by
the
Committee
on
Appeal
for
Human
Rights
.
'
intend
to
attend
'
``
We
intend
to
attend
the
downtown
theaters
before
the
first
of
the
year
''
,
the
identically
worded
letters
said
.
The
letters
set
a
Nov.
15
deadline
for
the
start
of
negotiations
.
They
indicated
that
stand-ins
and
picketing
would
be
started
if
theater
owners
failed
to
cooperate
.
Downtown
and
art
theater
managers
and
owners
,
contacted
Friday
night
for
comment
on
the
COAHR
request
,
said
they
had
no
knowledge
of
such
a
letter
,
and
that
it
was
not
in
the
Friday
mail
.
However
,
three
of
the
managers
did
say
that
they
would
agree
to
attend
the
proposed
meeting
if
all
of
the
other
managers
decided
to
attend
.
Gather
here
The
COAHR
letter
comes
on
the
eve
of
a
large
gathering
of
theater
managers
and
owners
scheduled
to
begin
here
Sunday
.
Several
theater
operators
said
,
however
,
that
there
is
little
likelihood
of
the
subject
being
discussed
during
the
three-day
affair
.
Student
leaders
began
sporadic
efforts
to
negotiate
theater
integration
several
months
ago
.
Charles
A.
Black
,
COAHR
chairman
,
said
Friday
that
three
theater
representatives
had
agreed
to
meet
with
the
students
on
Oct.
31
but
had
failed
to
show
up
.
He
declined
to
name
the
three
.
Friday's
letters
asked
for
a
Nov.
15
meeting
.
Failure
to
attend
the
meeting
or
explain
inability
to
attend
,
the
letters
said
,
would
be
considered
a
``
sign
of
indifference
''
.
Black
said
COAHR
``
hoped
to
be
able
to
integrate
the
theaters
without
taking
direct
action
,
but
we
are
pledged
to
using
every
legal
and
nonviolent
means
at
our
disposal
''
A
prepared
statement
released
by
the
student
group
Friday
stated
that
``
extensive
research
by
COAHR
into
techniques
and
methods
of
theater
integration
in
other
cities
indicated
that
the
presence
of
picket
lines
and
stand-ins
before
segregated
theaters
causes
a
drop
in
profits
''
Besides
managers
of
downtown
theaters
,
the
students
sent
letters
to
owners
of
art
theaters
in
the
uptown
area
and
Buckhead
.
R.
E.
Killingsworth
Raymond
E.
Killingsworth
,
72
,
died
Sunday
at
his
home
at
357
Venable
St.
,
Aj
.
Mr.
Kililngsworth
was
a
foreman
with
S
and
W
Cafeteria
.
He
was
born
in
Pittsboro
,
Miss.
,
and
was
a
veteran
of
World
War
1
.
He
was
a
member
of
the
Baptist
church
.
Survivors
include
two
brothers
,
C.
E.
Killingsworth
,
Atlanta
,
and
John
Killingsworth
,
Warren
,
Ohio
;
;
and
two
sisters
,
Miss
Minnie
Kililngsworth
and
Mrs.
Bessie
Bloom
,
both
of
Gettysburg
,
Pa.
.
John
W.
Ball
John
William
Ball
,
68
,
of
133
Marietta
St.
NW
,
Apartment
101b
,
died
Sunday
at
his
home
.
Mr.
Ball
was
a
house
painter
.
He
was
a
member
of
the
Oakland
City
Methodist
Church
and
a
native
of
Atlanta
.
Funeral
services
will
be
at
2
p.m.
Tuesday
at
Blanchard's
Chapel
with
the
Rev.
J.
H.
Hearn
officiating
.
Survivors
include
his
sister
,
Mrs.
Emma
B.
Odom
of
Atlanta
.
Mrs.
Lola
Harris
Mrs.
Lola
M.
Harris
,
a
native
of
Atlanta
,
died
Sunday
at
her
home
in
Garland
,
Tex.
.
Survivors
include
a
son
,
Charles
R.
Fergeson
,
Memphis
,
Tenn.
;
;
two
daughters
,
Mrs.
Gene
F.
Stoll
and
Miss
Nancy
Harris
,
both
of
Garland
;
;
her
father
,
H.
T.
Simpson
,
Greenville
,
S.C.
,
and
three
sisters
,
Mrs.
W.
E.
Little
and
Mrs.
Hal
B.
Wansley
,
both
of
Atlanta
,
and
Mrs.
Bill
Wallace
,
Wilmington
,
N.C.
.
A
24-year-old
Atlanta
man
was
arrested
Sunday
after
breaking
into
the
home
of
relatives
in
search
of
his
wife
,
hitting
his
uncle
with
a
rock
and
assaulting
two
police
officers
who
tried
to
subdue
him
,
police
said
.
Patrolmen
J.
W.
Slate
and
A.
L.
Crawford
Jr.
said
they
arrested
Ronald
M.
Thomas
,
of
1671
Nakoma
St.
,
NW
,
after
he
assaulted
the
officers
.
Police
account
The
officers
gave
this
account
:
Thomas
early
Sunday
went
to
the
home
of
his
uncle
and
aunt
,
Mr.
and
Mrs.
R.
C.
Thomas
,
511
Blanche
St.
,
NW
,
looking
for
his
wife
,
Margaret
Lou
Thomas
,
18
,
and
their
11-month-old
baby
.
The
younger
Thomas
ripped
a
screen
door
,
breaking
the
latch
,
and
after
an
argument
struck
his
uncle
with
a
rock
,
scratching
his
face
.
He
also
struck
his
aunt
and
wife
,
and
during
the
melee
the
baby
also
suffered
scratches
.
When
police
arrived
the
man
was
still
violent
,
Slate
said
.
Attacks
officer
He
attacked
one
of
the
officers
and
was
restrained
.
About
five
minutes
later
he
jumped
up
,
Slate
said
,
and
struck
the
two
policemen
again
.
He
was
then
subdued
and
placed
in
the
police
car
to
be
taken
to
Grady
Hospital
for
treatment
of
scratches
received
in
the
melee
.
Then
he
attacked
the
two
officers
again
and
was
again
restrained
,
Slate
related
.
Slate
said
he
and
Crawford
received
cuts
and
scratches
and
their
uniforms
were
badly
torn
.
Thomas
was
charged
with
four
counts
of
assault
and
battery
.
Two
counts
of
assault
on
an
officer
,
resisting
arrest
,
disturbance
and
cursing
,
police
said
.
A
hearing
was
set
for
30
a.m.
Tuesday
.
Mrs.
Mary
Self
,
who
knows
more
than
any
other
person
about
the
5,000
city
employes
for
whom
she
has
kept
personnel
records
over
the
years
,
has
closed
her
desk
and
retired
.
Over
the
weekend
,
Mrs.
Self
,
personnel
clerk
,
was
a
feted
and
honored
guest
of
the
Atlanta
Club
,
organization
of
women
employes
at
City
Hall
.
After
18
years
in
the
personnel
office
,
she
has
taken
a
disability
pension
on
advice
of
her
doctors
.
As
personnel
clerk
,
she
handled
thousands
of
entries
,
ranging
from
appointments
to
jobs
,
to
transfers
to
other
employments
,
to
pensions
.
``
I
have
enjoyed
it
and
will
feel
a
bit
lost
at
least
for
a
while
''
,
she
said
wistfully
Friday
.
One
of
the
largest
crowds
in
the
club's
history
turned
out
to
pay
tribute
to
Mrs.
Self
and
her
service
.
Georgia's
Department
of
Agriculture
is
intensifying
its
fire
ant
eradication
program
in
an
effort
to
stay
ahead
of
the
fast-spreading
pest
.
The
department
is
planning
to
expand
its
eradication
program
soon
to
four
additional
counties
--
Troup
,
Pierce
,
Bryan
and
Bulloch
--
to
treat
132,000
acres
infested
by
the
ants
,
according
to
W.
E.
Blasingame
state
entomologist
.
Low-flying
planes
will
spread
a
granular-type
chemical
,
heptachlor
,
over
30,000
acres
in
Troup
,
37,000
acres
in
Pierce
and
65,000
acres
in
Bulloch
and
Bryan
counties
.
The
eradication
effort
is
being
pushed
in
Bibb
and
Jones
counties
,
over
37,679
acres
.
The
department
has
just
finished
treating
20,000
acres
in
urban
areas
of
Macon
.
Also
being
treated
are
Houston
,
Bleckley
,
Tift
,
Turner
and
Dodge
counties
,
Blasingame
said
.
The
fire
ant
is
thought
to
infest
approximately
two
million
acres
of
land
in
Georgia
,
attacking
crops
,
young
wildlife
and
livestock
and
can
be
a
serious
health
menace
to
humans
who
are
allergic
to
its
venom
,
Blasingame
said
.
The
north-bound
entrance
to
the
Expressway
at
14th
Street
will
be
closed
during
the
afternoon
rush
traffic
hours
this
week
.
This
is
being
done
so
that
Georgia
Tech
can
complete
the
final
phase
of
a
traffic
survey
on
the
North
Expressway
.
Students
have
been
using
electric
computers
and
high
speed
movie
cameras
during
the
study
.
Perhaps
the
engineers
can
find
out
what
causes
all
the
congestion
and
suggest
methods
to
eliminate
it
.
Incidentally
,
14th
Street
and
the
Expressway
is
the
high
accident
intersection
during
daylight
hours
.
It
is
followed
by
Cain
Street
and
Piedmont
Avenue
,
NE
;
;
the
junction
of
the
Northeast
and
Northwest
Expressways
and
Jones
Avenue
and
Marietta
Street
,
Aj
.
Four
persons
died
in
Georgia
weekend
traffic
crashes
,
two
of
them
in
a
fiery
crash
near
Snellville
,
the
State
Patrol
said
Sunday
.
The
latest
death
reported
was
that
of
4-year-old
Claude
Douglas
Maynor
of
Calvary
.
Troopers
said
the
child
ran
into
the
path
of
a
passing
car
a
half-mile
north
of
Calvary
on
Georgia
111
in
Grady
County
.
That
death
occurred
at
50
p.m.
Friday
and
was
reported
Sunday
,
the
patrol
said
.
Bursts
into
flames
An
auto
overturned
,
skidding
into
a
stopped
tractor-trailer
and
burst
into
flames
near
Snellville
,
the
patrol
said
.
Bobby
Bester
Hammett
,
21
,
of
Rte.
3
,
Lawrenceville
,
and
Mrs.
Lucille
Herrington
Jones
,
23
,
of
Lawrenceville
,
died
in
the
flaming
car
,
the
patrol
said
.
Salem
(
special
)
--
For
a
second
month
in
a
row
,
Multnomah
County
may
be
short
of
general
assistance
money
in
its
budget
to
handle
an
unusually
high
summer
month's
need
,
the
state
public
welfare
commission
was
told
Friday
.
It
is
the
only
county
in
the
state
so
far
this
month
reporting
a
possible
shortage
in
GA
category
,
for
which
emergency
allotment
can
be
given
by
the
state
if
necessary
.
William
Smythe
,
director
of
field
service
,
told
the
commissioners
that
Multnomah
,
as
of
Aug.
22
,
had
spent
$58,918
out
of
its
budgeted
$66,000
in
the
category
,
leaving
only
$7,082
for
the
rest
of
the
month
.
At
the
rate
of
need
indicated
in
the
early
weeks
of
the
month
,
this
could
mean
a
shortage
of
as
high
as
$17,000
.
But
it
probably
will
be
less
because
of
a
usual
slackening
during
the
last
weeks
of
each
month
,
Smythe
said
.
No
request
for
emergency
allotment
had
yet
been
received
,
however
.
Board
oks
pact
The
commission
,
meeting
for
the
first
time
with
both
of
its
newly-appointed
commissioners
,
Roy
Webster
,
of
Hood
River
,
and
Dr.
Ennis
Keizer
,
of
North
Bend
,
approved
a
year's
contract
for
a
consultant
in
the
data
processing
department
who
has
been
the
center
of
considerable
controversy
in
the
past
.
The
contract
with
Ray
Field
,
who
has
been
converting
the
agencies
electronic
data
processing
program
to
magnetic
tape
,
would
renew
his
present
salary
of
$8
an
hour
up
to
a
maximum
of
200
hours
a
month
.
Field
does
the
planning
for
the
machine
operations
and
fiscal
processes
and
the
adapting
of
the
data
processing
system
to
new
programs
as
they
are
made
necessary
by
legislative
and
policy
changes
.
Acting
Administrator
Andrew
F.
Juras
said
that
because
of
Field's
unique
position
and
knowledge
in
the
program
,
the
agency
now
would
be
seriously
handicapped
if
he
was
not
continued
for
a
period
.
But
he
emphasized
that
the
agency
must
train
people
within
its
own
employ
to
fulfill
what
Field
handles
,
and
he
said
he
personally
``
regrets
very
much
that
the
agency
has
not
done
this
in
the
past
''
.
He
pointed
out
to
the
commissioners
that
the
agency
was
literally
dependent
now
on
the
machine
processing
,
``
and
the
whole
wheels
of
the
agency
would
stop
if
it
broke
down
or
the
three
or
four
persons
directing
it
were
to
leave
''
.
Salary
termed
modest
Juras
said
he
insisted
Field
be
continued
on
a
consultant
basis
only
and
be
answerable
directly
to
the
administrator
of
the
agency
and
not
to
other
agencies
of
the
government
.
He
also
said
that
the
salary
,
in
terms
of
going
rates
in
the
field
,
was
``
modest
''
in
terms
of
the
man's
responsibility
.
The
conversion
to
magnetic
tape
is
not
yet
completed
,
he
said
,
and
added
Field's
long
service
in
state
government
and
welfare
employ
gave
him
familiarity
with
the
welfare
program
.
``
Do
you
feel
you
can
stand
up
to
the
next
legislative
session
and
defend
this
contract
''
?
?
Asked
Mrs.
Grace
O.
Peck
,
representative
from
Multnomah
County
,
of
the
commission
chairman
,
Joseph
E.
Harvey
Jr.
.
``
My
feeling
at
the
moment
''
,
he
said
,
``
is
that
we
have
no
alternative
,
irrespective
of
some
of
the
arguments
about
him
.
The
continued
operation
of
this
program
depends
on
having
his
service
''
.
Harvey
criticized
Mrs.
Peck
,
later
joined
by
the
commission's
vice-chairman
,
Mrs.
Lee
Patterson
,
took
Harvey
to
task
for
comments
he
had
made
to
the
North
Portland
Rotary
Club
Tuesday
.
A
publicity
release
from
Oregon
Physicians
Service
,
of
which
Harvey
is
president
,
quoted
him
as
saying
the
welfare
office
move
to
Salem
,
instead
of
``
crippling
''
the
agency
,
had
provided
an
avenue
to
correct
administrative
weaknesses
,
with
the
key
being
improved
communications
between
F
&
A
and
the
commission
staff
.
``
I
rather
resent
''
,
she
said
,
``
you
speaking
to
those
groups
in
Portland
as
though
just
the
move
accomplished
this
.
I
think
you
fell
short
of
the
real
truth
in
the
matter
:
That
the
move
is
working
out
through
the
fine
cooperation
of
the
staff
and
all
the
people
.
The
staff
deserves
a
lot
of
credit
working
down
here
under
real
obstacles
''
.
Harvey
said
his
objective
was
to
create
a
better
public
image
for
welfare
''
.
The
wife
of
convicted
bank
robber
Lawrence
G.
Huntley
was
arrested
in
Phoenix
,
Ariz.
,
last
week
and
will
be
returned
to
Portland
to
face
charges
of
assault
and
robbery
,
Portland
detectives
said
Friday
.
Mrs.
Lavaughn
Huntley
is
accused
of
driving
the
getaway
car
used
in
a
robbery
of
the
Woodyard
Bros.'
Grocery
,
2825
E.
Burnside
St.
,
in
April
of
1959
.
Her
husband
,
who
was
sentenced
to
15
years
in
the
federal
prison
at
McNeil
Island
last
April
for
robbery
of
the
Hillsdale
branch
of
Multnomah
Bank
,
also
was
charged
with
the
store
holdup
.
Secret
Grand
Jury
indictments
were
returned
against
the
pair
last
week
,
Detective
Murray
Logan
reported
.
The
Phoenix
arrest
culminates
more
than
a
year's
investigation
by
Detective
William
Taylor
and
other
officers
.
Taylor
said
Mrs.
Huntley
and
her
husband
also
will
be
questioned
about
a
series
of
15
Portland
robberies
in
spring
of
1959
in
which
the
holdup
men
bound
their
victims
with
tape
before
fleeing
.
Mrs.
Huntley
was
held
on
$20,000
bond
in
Phoenix
.
She
was
arrested
by
Phoenix
Police
after
they
received
the
indictment
papers
from
Portland
detectives
.
A
12-year-old
girl
,
Susan
Elaine
Smith
,
9329
NE
Schuyler
St.
was
in
serious
condition
Friday
at
Bess
Kaiser
Hospital
,
victim
of
a
bicycle-auto
collision
in
the
Gateway
Shopping
Center
,
parking
area
,
Deputy
Sheriff
W.
H.
Forsyth
reported
.
Funeral
for
William
Joseph
Brett
,
1926
NE
50th
Ave.
,
who
died
Thursday
in
Portland
,
will
be
Monday
1
p.m.
at
the
Riverview
Abbey
.
Mr.
Brett
,
born
in
Brooklyn
,
N.Y.
,
Dec.
15
,
1886
,
came
to
Portland
in
1920
.
He
owned
a
logging
equipment
business
here
from
1923
to
1928
,
and
later
became
Northwest
district
manager
for
Macwhyte
Co.
.
He
retired
in
1958
.
Survivors
are
his
widow
,
Alice
;
;
a
son
,
William
,
Seattle
,
Wash.
;
;
three
sisters
,
Mrs.
Eugene
Horstman
,
Los
Angeles
,
Mrs.
Lucy
Brett
Andrew
,
New
York
City
,
and
Mrs.
Beatrice
Kiefferm
,
New
York
City
,
and
five
grandchildren
.
Employes
of
Montgomery
Ward
&
Co.
at
The
Dalles
,
in
a
National
Labor
Relations
Board
election
Thursday
voted
to
decertify
Local
1565
,
Retail
Clerks
International
Association
,
AFL-CIO
,
as
their
collective
bargaining
agent
.
The
NLRB
said
that
of
11
potentially
eligible
voters
eight
voted
against
the
union
,
two
voted
for
it
,
and
one
vote
was
challenged
.
Monte
Brooks
,
67
,
theatrical
producer
and
band
leader
,
collapsed
and
died
Thursday
in
a
Lloyd
Center
restaurant
.
He
lived
at
6124
N.
Willamette
Blvd.
.
For
many
years
he
had
provided
music
and
entertainment
for
functions
throughout
the
Northwest
.
These
included
Oregon
State
Fair
,
for
which
he
had
been
booked
on
and
off
,
for
30
years
.
He
collaborated
with
many
of
the
big
name
entertainers
visiting
Portland
,
among
the
most
recent
being
Jimmy
Durante
and
Phil
Silvers
.
He
had
conducted
the
20-piece
band
in
a
series
of
concerts
at
Blue
Lake
park
during
the
summer
months
.
Mr.
Brooks
was
born
in
New
York
,
and
came
to
Portland
in
1920
.
He
planned
at
one
time
to
enter
the
legal
profession
,
but
gave
up
the
plan
in
favor
of
the
entertainment
field
.
He
was
a
member
of
Harmony
lodge
,
No.
12
,
AF
&
AM
,
Scottish
Rite
;
;
Al
Kader
Temple
of
the
Shrine
;
;
Order
of
Elks
,
Lodge
No.
142
;
;
40
&
8
Voiture
,
No.
25
,
Musician's
Union
,
Local
99
.
He
was
a
former
commander
of
Willamette
Heights
,
Post
,
and
a
member
of
Nevah
Sholom
Congregation
.
Survivors
are
his
widow
,
Tearle
;
;
a
son
,
Sheldon
Brooks
;
;
a
daughter
,
Mrs.
Sidney
S.
Stein
Jr.
,
Dorenzo
,
Calif.
;
;
a
sister
,
Mrs.
Birdie
Gevurtz
;
;
two
brothers
,
Charley
and
Aaron
Cohn
,
San
Francisco
;
;
and
five
grandchildren
.
Services
will
be
at
30
p.m.
Monday
at
Holman
&
Son
Funeral
Home
,
with
interment
in
Neveh
Zebek
cemetery
.
The
family
requests
that
flowers
be
omitted
.
A
16-year-old
Portland
businessman
and
his
Junior
Achievement
company
,
have
been
judged
the
``
Company
of
the
Year
''
in
national
competition
completed
this
week
at
Ohio
State
University
,
Columbus
,
Ohio
.
Tim
Larson
,
a
junior
at
Wilson
High
School
and
president
of
Spice-Nice
,
is
the
young
executive
who
guided
his
firm
to
the
top-ranking
position
over
the
4,500
other
Junior
Achievement
companies
in
the
United
States
and
Canada
.
The
award
is
the
first
such
honor
in
the
11-year
history
of
JA
activities
in
Portland
,
according
to
Ralph
Scolatti
,
local
executive
director
for
Junior
Achievement
.
Spice-Nice
,
counseled
by
Georgia-Pacific
Corp.
,
had
previously
taken
first-place
honors
in
both
local
competition
and
the
regional
conference
at
San
Francisco
.
The
``
pocket-size
''
company
set
records
with
$2,170
in
sales
of
its
products
,
a
selection
of
barbecue
spices
,
and
paid
stockholders
a
20
per
cent
dividend
on
their
investment
.
Youngsters
do
business
The
Junior
Achievement
program
is
designed
to
give
teenagers
practical
experience
in
business
by
allowing
them
actually
to
form
small
companies
,
under
the
guidance
and
sponsorship
of
business
firms
.
The
youngsters
sell
stock
,
produce
and
sell
a
product
,
pay
taxes
,
and
show
a
profit
or
loss
just
like
full-scale
businesses
.
National
competition
was
the
culmination
of
work
which
began
with
the
school
year
last
fall
and
continued
until
just
before
summer
vacation
.
Participants
in
the
27
Portland
companies
worked
one
night
a
week
through
the
school
year
,
guided
and
counseled
by
adult
advisors
drawn
from
local
business
and
industry
.
Over
400
Portland
firms
contributed
funds
for
the
maintenance
of
Junior
Achievement
headquarters
here
.
For
winning
Larson
will
receive
a
$100
U.S.
Savings
Bond
from
the
Junior
Achievement
national
organization
.
His
company
,
Spice-Nice
,
will
receive
a
$250
award
,
which
will
be
distributed
among
the
16
charter
members
.
g-p
men
served
Advisors
for
the
``
national
champion
''
company
were
John
K.
Morgan
,
William
H.
Baker
,
Leonard
Breuer
and
William
F.
Stephenson
,
all
of
Georgia-Pacific
Corp.
.
Young
Larson
is
the
son
of
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Lawrence
Larson
,
5847
SW
Nevada
Ct.
,
Portland
.
Other
members
of
the
Portland
delegation
attending
the
conference
in
Columbus
are
:
Kathleen
Mason
,
Jefferson
high
school
;
;
Phil
Reifenrath
,
Madison
high
school
;
;
Ann
Wegener
,
Madison
;
;
Richard
E.
Cohn
,
Grant
;
;
Karen
Kolb
,
Franklin
;
;
and
Shelby
Carlson
,
Cleveland
.
Hillsboro
(
special
)
--
Washington
County's
36th
annual
fair
will
close
Saturday
evening
with
4-H
and
FFA
awards
program
at
7
,
public
dance
at
8
and
variety
show
at
8:30
.
On
the
day's
schedule
are
a
flower
show
,
4-H
horsemanship
contest
and
clown
shows
,
the
latter
at
11
a.m.
and
3
p.m.
.
Attendance
continued
to
run
ahead
of
last
year's
during
the
five-day
show
,
with
clear
skies
helping
attract
fairgoers
.
Exhibition
ballroom
dancers
from
the
studio
of
Helen
Wick
Walters
of
Hillsboro
won
the
all-county
talent
contest
.
Bill
Davis
quartet
of
Hillsboro
was
second
and
baton
twirler
Sue
Ann
Nuttall
of
Reedville
third
.
Finalists
from
the
county's
east
end
failed
to
place
.
Results
:
Janet
Jossy
of
North
Plains
won
grand
champion
honors
of
the
4-H
sheep
showman
contest
.
Blue
ribbons
went
to
Stephanie
Shaw
of
Hillsboro
,
Larry
Hinton
of
Beaverton
.
Joan
Zurcher
of
Hillsboro
,
Phyllis
Jossy
of
North
Plains
,
Jane
Cox
of
North
Plains
.
Kathy
Jossy
of
Hillsboro
,
Carol
Jossy
of
North
Plains
and
Lorlyn
and
Tom
Zurcher
of
Hillsboro
.
Tom
Day
of
Beaverton
exhibited
the
grand
champion
4-H
market
hog
,
a
Chester
White
.
Also
winning
blue
ribbons
were
Bob
Day
of
Beaverton
,
Tony
Traxel
of
Beaverton
and
Steve
Hutchins
of
Banks
.
Swine
showmanship
championship
went
to
Bob
Day
,
with
Tom
Day
and
Hutchins
winning
other
blues
.
Charles
Reynolds
of
Pumpkin
Ridge
was
rabbit
showmanship
champion
.
In
poultry
judging
,
blues
were
won
by
John
Nyberg
of
Tualatin
,
Anne
Batchelder
of
Hillsboro
,
Jim
Shaw
of
Hillsboro
,
Stephanie
Shaw
of
Hillsboro
and
Lynn
Robinson
of
Tigard
.
Blue
ribbon
for
one
dozen
white
eggs
was
taken
by
Nyberg
.
In
open
class
poultry
,
Donald
Wacklin
of
Sherwood
had
the
champion
male
and
female
bird
and
grand
champion
bird
.
John
Haase
&
Son
of
Corneilus
was
the
only
entrant
in
open
class
swine
and
swept
all
championships
.
Carol
Strong
,
13
,
of
Cedar
Mill
cooked
the
championship
junior
dollar
dinner
.
Millie
Jansen
,
high
school
senior
from
Verboort
,
had
the
championship
dollar
dinner
,
and
Jody
Jaross
of
Hillsboro
also
won
a
blue
ribbon
.
Barbara
Borland
of
Tigard
took
top
senior
individual
home
economics
honors
with
a
demonstration
called
filbert
hats
.
About
70
North
Providence
taxpayers
made
appeals
to
the
board
of
tax
assessors
for
a
review
of
their
1961
tax
assessments
during
the
last
two
days
at
the
town
hall
in
Centredale
.
These
were
the
last
two
days
set
aside
by
the
board
for
hearing
appeals
.
Appeals
were
heard
for
two
days
two
weeks
ago
.
About
75
persons
appeared
at
that
time
.
Louis
H.
Grenier
,
clerk
of
the
board
,
said
that
the
appeals
will
be
reviewed
in
December
at
the
time
the
board
is
visiting
new
construction
sites
in
the
town
for
assessment
purposes
.
They
also
will
visit
properties
on
which
appeals
have
been
made
.
Any
adjustments
which
are
made
,
Mr.
Grenier
said
earlier
this
month
,
will
appear
on
the
balance
of
the
tax
bill
since
most
of
the
town's
taxpayers
take
the
option
of
paying
quarterly
with
the
balance
due
next
year
.
John
Pezza
,
69
,
of
734
Hartford
Avenue
,
Providence
,
complained
of
shoulder
pains
after
an
accident
in
which
a
car
he
was
driving
collided
with
a
car
driven
by
Antonio
Giorgio
,
25
,
of
12
DeSoto
St.
,
Providence
,
on
Greenville
Avenue
and
Cherry
Hill
Road
in
Johnston
yesterday
.
Mr.
Giorgio
had
started
to
turn
left
off
Greenville
Avenue
onto
Cherry
Hill
Road
when
his
car
was
struck
by
the
Pezza
car
,
police
said
.
Both
cars
were
slightly
damaged
.
Mr.
Pezza
was
taken
to
a
nearby
Johnston
physician
,
Dr.
Allan
A.
DiSimone
,
who
treated
him
.
Mr.
Giorgio
was
uninjured
.
Thieves
yesterday
ransacked
a
home
in
the
Garden
Hills
section
of
Cranston
and
stole
an
estimated
$3,675
worth
of
furs
,
jewels
,
foreign
coins
and
American
dollars
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Stephen
M.
Kochanek
reported
the
theft
at
their
home
on
41
Garden
Hills
Drive
at
about
6
last
night
.
They
told
police
the
intruders
took
a
mink
coat
worth
$700
,
a
black
Persian
lamb
jacket
worth
$450
;
;
a
wallet
with
$450
in
it
;
;
a
collection
of
English
,
French
and
German
coins
,
valued
at
$500
;
;
four
rings
,
a
watch
and
a
set
of
pearl
earrings
.
One
of
the
rings
was
a
white
gold
band
with
a
diamond
setting
,
valued
at
$900
.
The
others
were
valued
at
$325
,
$75
and
$65
.
The
watch
was
valued
at
$125
and
the
earrings
at
$85
.
The
Kochaneks
told
police
they
left
home
at
8
a.m.
and
returned
about
45
p.m.
and
found
the
house
had
been
entered
.
Patrolman
Robert
J.
Nunes
,
who
investigated
,
said
the
thieves
broke
in
through
the
back
door
.
Drawers
and
cabinets
in
two
bedrooms
and
a
sewing
room
were
ransacked
.
The
city
sewer
maintenance
division
said
efforts
will
be
made
Sunday
to
clear
a
stoppage
in
a
sewer
connection
at
Eddy
and
Elm
Streets
responsible
for
dumping
raw
sewage
into
the
Providence
River
.
The
division
said
it
would
be
impossible
to
work
on
the
line
until
then
because
of
the
large
amount
of
acid
sewage
from
jewelry
plants
in
the
area
flowing
through
the
line
,
heavy
vehicle
traffic
on
Eddy
Street
and
tide
conditions
.
A
two-family
house
at
255
Brook
Street
has
been
purchased
by
Brown
University
from
Lawrence
J.
Sullivan
,
according
to
a
deed
filed
Monday
at
City
Hall
.
F.
Morris
Cochran
,
university
vice
president
and
business
manager
,
said
the
house
has
been
bought
to
provide
rental
housing
for
faculty
families
,
particularly
for
those
here
for
a
limited
time
.
Employes
of
Pawtucket's
garbage
and
rubbish
collection
contractor
picketed
the
firm's
incinerator
site
yesterday
in
the
second
day
of
a
strike
for
improved
wages
and
working
conditions
.
Thomas
Rotelli
,
head
of
Rhode
Island
Incinerator
Service
,
Inc.
,
said
four
of
the
company's
eight
trucks
were
making
collections
with
both
newly
hired
and
regular
workers
.
Sydney
Larson
,
a
staff
representative
for
the
United
Steel
Workers
,
which
the
firm's
25
workers
joined
before
striking
,
said
the
state
Labor
Relations
Board
has
been
asked
to
set
up
an
election
to
pick
a
bargaining
agent
.
A
62-year-old
Smithfield
man
,
Lester
E.
Stone
of
19
Beverly
Circle
,
was
in
satisfactory
condition
last
night
at
Our
Lady
of
Fatima
Hospital
,
North
Providence
,
with
injuries
suffered
when
a
car
he
was
driving
struck
a
utility
pole
on
Woonasquatucket
Avenue
in
North
Providence
near
Stevens
Street
.
Mr.
Stone
suffered
fractured
ribs
and
chest
cuts
,
hospital
authorities
said
.
He
was
taken
to
the
hospital
by
the
North
Providence
ambulance
.
Before
hitting
the
pole
,
Mr.
Stone's
car
brushed
against
a
car
driven
by
Alva
W.
Vernava
,
21
,
of
23
Maple
Ave.
,
North
Providence
,
tearing
away
the
rear
bumper
and
denting
the
left
rear
fender
of
the
Vernava
car
,
police
said
.
Mr.
Vernava
was
uninjured
.
The
impact
with
the
utility
pole
caused
a
brief
power
failure
in
the
immediate
area
of
the
accident
.
One
house
was
without
power
for
about
half
an
hour
,
a
Narragansett
Electric
Co.
spokesman
said
.
The
power
was
off
for
about
five
minutes
in
houses
along
Smith
Street
as
far
away
as
Fruit
Hill
Avenue
shortly
before
5
p.m.
when
the
accident
occurred
.
The
fight
over
the
Warwick
School
Committee's
appointment
of
a
coordinator
of
audio-visual
education
may
go
to
the
state
Supreme
Court
,
it
appeared
last
night
.
Two
members
of
the
Democratic-endorsed
majority
on
the
school
board
said
they
probably
would
vote
to
appeal
a
ruling
by
the
state
Board
of
Education
,
which
said
yesterday
that
the
school
committee
acted
improperly
in
its
appointment
of
the
coordinator
,
Francis
P.
Nolan
3rd
,
the
Democratic-endorsed
committee
chairman
,
could
not
be
reached
for
comment
.
In
its
ruling
,
the
state
Board
of
Education
upheld
Dr.
Michael
F.
Walsh
,
state
commissioner
of
education
,
who
had
ruled
previously
that
the
Warwick
board
erred
when
it
named
Maurice
F.
Tougas
as
coordinator
of
audio-visual
education
without
first
finding
that
the
school
superintendent's
candidate
was
not
suitable
.
Supt.
Clarence
S.
Taylor
had
recommended
Roger
I.
Vermeersch
for
the
post
.
Milton
and
Rosella
Lovett
of
Cranston
were
awarded
$55,000
damages
from
the
state
in
Superior
Court
yesterday
for
industrial
property
which
they
owned
at
83
Atwells
Ave.
,
Providence
,
and
which
was
condemned
for
use
in
construction
of
Interstate
Route
95
.
The
award
was
made
by
Judge
Fred
B.
Perkins
who
heard
their
petition
without
a
jury
by
agreement
of
the
parties
.
The
award
,
without
interest
,
compared
with
a
valuation
of
$57,500
placed
on
the
property
by
the
property
owners'
real
estate
expert
,
and
a
valuation
of
$52,500
placed
on
it
by
the
state's
expert
.
The
property
included
a
one-story
brick
manufacturing
building
on
8,293
square
feet
of
land
.
Saul
Hodosh
represented
the
owners
.
Atty.
Gen.
J.
Joseph
Nugent
appeared
for
the
state
.
Santa's
lieutenants
in
charge
of
the
Journal-Bulletin
Santa
Claus
Fund
are
looking
for
the
usual
generous
response
this
year
from
Cranston
residents
.
Persons
who
find
it
convenient
may
send
their
contributions
to
the
Journal-Bulletin's
Cranston
office
at
823
Park
Avenue
.
All
contributed
will
be
acknowledged
.
The
fund's
statewide
quota
this
year
is
$8,250
to
provide
Christmas
gifts
for
needy
youngsters
.
Scores
of
Cranston
children
will
be
remembered
.
Cranston
residents
have
been
generous
contributors
to
the
fund
over
the
years
.
Public
school
children
have
adopted
the
fund
as
one
of
their
favorite
Christmas
charities
and
their
pennies
,
nickels
,
dimes
and
quarters
aid
greatly
in
helping
Santa
to
reach
the
fund's
goal
.
Bernard
Parrillo
,
20
,
of
19
Fletcher
Ave.
,
Cranston
,
was
admitted
to
Roger
Williams
Hospital
shortly
before
11:30
a.m.
yesterday
after
a
hunting
accident
in
which
a
shotgun
he
was
carrying
discharged
against
his
heel
.
Mr.
Parrillo
was
given
first
aid
at
Johnston
Hose
1
.
(
Thornton
)
where
he
had
been
driven
by
a
companion
.
The
two
had
been
hunting
in
the
Simmonsville
area
of
town
and
Mr.
Parrillo
dropped
the
gun
which
fired
as
it
struck
the
ground
.
Hospital
officials
said
the
injury
was
severe
but
the
youth
was
in
good
condition
last
night
.
A
check
for
$4,177.37
representing
the
last
payment
of
a
$50,000
federal
grant
to
Rhode
Island
Hospital
was
presented
to
the
hospital
administrator
,
Oliver
G.
Pratt
,
yesterday
by
Governor
Notte
.
The
hospital
has
used
the
money
to
assist
in
alterations
on
the
fifth
floor
of
the
Jane
Brown
Hospital
,
part
of
Rhode
Island
Hospital
.
The
work
added
eight
beds
to
the
hospital
,
giving
it
a
total
capacity
of
646
general
beds
.
Vincent
Sorrentino
,
founder
and
board
chairman
of
the
Uncas
Mfg.
Co.
,
has
been
designated
a
Cavaliere
of
the
Order
of
Merit
of
the
Republic
of
Italy
.
The
decoration
will
be
presented
by
A.
Trichieri
,
Italian
consul
general
in
Boston
,
at
a
ceremony
at
30
p.m.
on
Dec.
7
at
the
plant
,
which
this
year
is
celebrating
its
golden
anniversary
.
About
500
employes
of
the
firm
will
be
on
hand
to
witness
bestowal
of
the
honor
upon
Mr.
Sorrentino
.
Mr.
Sorrentino
will
be
honored
on
the
evening
of
Dec.
7
at
a
dinner
to
be
given
by
the
Aurora
Club
at
the
Sheraton-Biltmore
Hotel
.
The
Newport-based
destroyer
picket
escort
Kretchmer
has
arrived
back
at
Newport
after
three
months'
patrol
in
North
Atlantic
waters
marked
by
mercy
jobs
afloat
and
ashore
.
On
Sept.
6
,
the
Kretchmer
rescued
the
crew
of
a
trawler
they
found
drifting
on
a
life
raft
after
they
had
abandoned
a
sinking
ship
.
In
August
while
stopping
in
Greenock
,
Scotland
,
three
members
of
the
crew
on
liberty
rendered
first
aid
to
a
girl
who
fell
from
a
train
.
Local
authorities
credited
the
men
with
saving
the
girl's
life
.
Birmingham
,
Ala.
--
(
AP
)
--
The
FBI
yesterday
arrested
on
a
perjury
charge
one
of
the
members
of
the
jury
that
failed
to
reach
a
verdict
in
the
``
Freedom
Rider
''
bus
burning
trial
four
weeks
ago
.
U.S.
Attorney
Macon
Weaver
said
the
federal
complaint
,
charged
that
the
juror
gave
false
information
when
asked
about
Ku
Klux
Klan
membership
during
selection
of
jury
.
He
identified
the
man
as
Lewis
Martin
Parker
,
59
,
a
farmer
of
Hartselle
,
Ala.
.
Eight
men
were
tried
together
in
U.S.
District
Court
in
Anniston
,
Ala.
,
on
charges
of
interfering
with
interstate
transportation
and
conspiracy
growing
out
of
a
white
mob's
attack
on
a
Greyhound
bus
carrying
the
first
of
the
Freedom
Riders
.
The
bus
was
burned
outside
Anniston
.
One
of
the
eight
defendants
was
freed
on
a
directed
verdict
of
acquittal
.
A
mistrial
was
declared
in
the
case
against
the
other
seven
when
the
jury
was
unable
to
agree
on
a
verdict
.
The
arrest
of
Mr.
Parker
marks
the
third
charge
of
wrongdoing
involving
the
jury
that
heard
the
case
.
The
first
incident
occurred
before
the
trial
got
under
way
when
Judge
H.
Hobart
Grooms
told
the
jury
panel
he
had
heard
reports
of
jury-tampering
efforts
.
He
asked
members
of
the
panel
to
tell
him
if
anyone
outside
the
court
had
spoken
to
them
about
the
case
.
Two
members
of
the
panel
later
told
in
court
about
receiving
telephone
calls
at
their
homes
from
anonymous
persons
expressing
interest
in
the
trial
.
Neither
was
seated
on
the
jury
.
Then
,
when
the
case
went
to
the
jury
,
the
judge
excused
one
of
the
jurors
,
saying
the
juror
had
told
him
he
had
been
accosted
by
masked
men
at
his
motel
the
night
before
the
trial
opened
.
The
juror
said
the
masked
men
had
advised
him
to
be
lenient
.
The
judge
replaced
the
juror
with
an
alternate
.
No
formal
charges
have
been
filed
as
a
result
of
either
of
the
two
reported
incidents
.
At
the
opening
of
the
trial
,
the
jury
panel
was
questioned
as
a
group
by
Mr.
Weaver
about
Ku
Klux
Klan
connections
.
One
member
of
the
panel
--
not
Mr.
Parker
--
indicated
he
had
been
a
member
of
the
KKK
at
one
time
.
He
was
not
seated
on
the
jury
.
The
perjury
charge
against
Mr.
Parker
carries
a
maximum
penalty
of
$2,000
fine
and
five
years
imprisonment
on
conviction
.
New
York
--
(
UPI
)
--
The
New
York
University
Board
of
Trustees
has
elected
the
youngest
president
in
the
130-year
history
of
NYU
,
it
was
announced
yesterday
.
The
new
president
is
37-year-old
Dr.
James
McN.
Hester
,
currently
dean
of
the
NYU
Graduate
School
of
Arts
and
Sciences
.
He
will
take
over
his
new
post
Jan.
1
.
Dr.
Hester
,
also
one
of
the
youngest
men
ever
to
head
a
major
American
university
,
succeeds
Dr.
Carroll
V.
Newsom
who
resigned
last
September
to
join
Prentice-Hall
Inc.
publishing
firm
.
Dr.
Hester
,
of
Princeton
,
N.J.
,
is
a
native
of
Chester
,
Pa.
He
joined
NYU
in
September
,
1960
.
Prior
to
that
he
was
associated
with
Long
Island
University
in
Brooklyn
.
Asilomar
,
March
26
Vast
spraying
programs
conducted
by
``
technicians
with
narrow
training
and
little
wisdom
''
are
endangering
crops
and
wildlife
,
Carl
W.
Buchheister
,
president
of
the
National
Audubon
Society
,
said
today
.
``
It
is
like
handing
a
loaded
automatic
to
an
8-year-old
and
telling
him
to
run
out
and
play
''
,
he
commented
.
Buchheister
told
delegates
to
the
West
Coast
Audubon
Convention
that
aerial
spraying
in
Louisiana
failed
to
destroy
its
target
,
the
fire
ant
.
``
But
it
did
destroy
the
natural
controls
of
a
borer
and
released
a
new
plague
that
wrecked
a
sugar
cane
crop
''
,
he
said
.
The
conservation
leader
said
other
mistakes
in
spraying
had
caused
serious
damage
in
Ohio
and
Wyoming
.
There
have
even
been
serious
errors
in
the
U.
S.
Forest
Service
,
whose
officials
pride
themselves
in
their
scientific
training
,
he
added
.
``
The
news
of
their
experiments
reaches
the
farmers
who
,
forgetting
that
birds
are
the
most
efficient
natural
enemies
of
insects
and
rodents
,
are
encouraged
to
try
to
get
rid
of
all
birds
that
occasionally
peck
their
grapes
or
their
blueberries
''
,
Buchheister
told
the
delegates
.
In
addition
to
urging
greater
restrictions
on
aerial
spraying
,
Buchheister
called
for
support
of
the
Wilderness
bill
,
creation
of
national
seashore
parks
,
including
Point
Reyes
;
;
preservation
of
the
wetlands
where
birds
breed
;
;
a
pesticides
co-ordination
act
;
;
stronger
water
pollution
control
programs
,
and
Federal
ratification
of
an
international
convention
to
halt
pollution
of
the
sea
by
oil
.
The
Reed
Rogers
Da
Fonta
Wild
Life
Sanctuary
in
Marin
county
on
Friday
officially
became
the
property
of
the
National
Audubon
Society
.
Mrs.
Norman
Livermore
,
president
of
the
Marin
Conservation
League
,
handed
over
the
deed
to
the
645-acre
tidelands
tract
south
of
Greenwood
Beach
to
Carl
W.
Buchheister
,
president
of
the
Society
.
The
presentation
was
made
before
several
hundred
persons
at
the
annual
meeting
of
the
League
at
Olney
Hall
,
College
of
Marin
,
Kentfield
.
Buchheister
pledged
the
land
would
be
an
``
inviolate
''
sanctuary
for
all
birds
,
animals
and
plants
.
Seventeen
years
ago
today
,
German
scientist
Willy
Fiedler
climbed
into
a
makeshift
cockpit
installed
in
a
V-1
rocket-bomb
that
was
attached
to
the
underbelly
of
a
Heinkel
bomber
.
The
World
War
2
,
German
bomber
rolled
down
a
runway
and
took
off
.
The
only
way
Fiedler
could
get
back
to
earth
alive
was
to
fly
the
pulse
jet
missile
and
land
it
on
the
airstrip
.
This
had
never
been
done
before
.
Now
a
quiet-spoken
,
middle-aged
man
,
Fiedler
is
an
aeronautical
engineer
for
Lockheed's
Missiles
and
Space
Division
at
Sunnyvale
,
where
he
played
a
key
role
in
the
development
of
the
Navy's
Polaris
missile
.
He
sat
in
his
office
yesterday
and
recalled
that
historic
flight
in
1944
.
``
The
first
two
pilots
had
crashed
''
,
he
said
.
``
I
had
developed
the
machines
and
therefore
knew
them
.
It
was
time
to
go
up
myself
''
.
Fiedler
was
then
technical
director
of
Hitler's
super-secret
``
Reichenberg
project
''
,
which
remained
unknown
to
the
Allies
until
after
the
war
.
About
200
of
the
special
V-1
rocket-bombs
were
to
be
made
ready
for
manned
flight
with
an
explosive
warhead
.
The
target
was
Allied
shipping
--
a
desperate
effort
to
stave
off
the
Allied
invasion
of
Europe
.
The
success
of
the
project
depended
upon
Fiedler's
flight
.
Squeezed
into
the
few
cubic
feet
normally
filled
by
the
rocket's
automatic
guidance
mechanism
,
the
scientist
waited
while
the
bomber
gained
altitude
.
At
12,000
feet
,
Fiedler
signaled
``
release
''
,
and
started
the
roaring
pulse-jet
engine
--
then
streaked
away
from
beneath
the
Heinkel
.
To
the
German
pilot
in
the
bomber
the
rocket
became
a
faint
black
speck
,
hurtling
through
the
sky
at
the
then
incredible
speed
of
420
m.p.h.
.
It
was
probably
man's
first
successful
flight
in
a
missile
.
``
She
flew
beautifully
''
,
said
Fiedler
.
``
There
was
only
one
power
control
--
a
valve
to
adjust
the
fuel
flow
.
I
had
exactly
20
minutes
to
get
down
to
the
test
strip
''
.
Using
a
steering
system
that
controlled
the
modified
rocket's
tail
surfaces
and
wings
equipped
with
ailerons
,
Fiedler
was
to
land
the
missile
on
a
skid
especially
bolted
under
the
fuselage
.
He
managed
to
maneuver
the
missile
to
a
landing
speed
of
200
m.p.h.
--
fast
even
for
a
modern
jet
plane
touchdown
--
and
banked
into
the
airfield
.
Moments
later
the
V-1
skimmed
across
the
landing
strip
,
edging
closer
and
closer
to
a
touchdown
--
then
in
a
streamer
of
dust
it
landed
.
Fiedler
went
on
to
make
several
other
test
flights
before
German
pilots
took
over
the
Reichenberg
missiles
.
The
missiles
were
to
be
armed
with
an
underwater
bomb
.
Pilots
would
steer
them
in
a
suicide
dive
into
the
water
,
striking
below
the
waterline
of
individual
ships
.
A
crack
corps
of
50
pilots
was
formed
from
the
ranks
of
volunteers
,
but
the
project
was
halted
before
the
end
of
the
war
,
and
the
missiles
later
fell
into
Allied
hands
.
Now
a
family
man
with
three
children
,
Fiedler
lives
in
a
quiet
residential
area
near
the
Lockheed
plant
at
Sunnyvale
.
His
spare
time
is
spent
in
soaring
gliders
.
``
It's
so
quiet
''
,
he
said
,
``
so
slow
,
serene
--
and
so
challenging
''
.
John
Di
Massimo
has
been
elected
president
of
the
1961
Columbus
Day
Celebration
Committee
,
it
was
announced
yesterday
.
Other
officers
are
Angelo
J.
Scampini
,
vice
president
,
Joseph
V.
Arata
,
treasurer
,
and
Fred
J.
Casassa
,
secretary
.
Judge
John
B.
Molinari
was
named
chairman
of
the
executive
committee
.
Elected
to
the
board
of
directors
were
:
Elios
P.
Anderlini
,
Attilio
Beronio
,
Leo
M.
Bianco
,
Frederic
Campagnoli
,
Joseph
Cervetto
,
Armond
J.
De
Martini
,
Grace
Duhagon
,
John
P.
Figone
,
John
P.
Figone
Jr.
,
Stephen
Mana
,
John
Moscone
,
Calude
Perasso
,
Angelo
Petrini
,
Frank
Ratto
,
and
George
R.
Reilly
.
Dr.
Albert
Schweitzer
,
world-famous
theologian
and
medical
missionary
,
has
endorsed
an
Easter
March
for
Disarmament
which
begins
tomorrow
in
Sunnyvale
.
Members
of
the
San
Francisco
American
Friends
Service
,
a
Quaker
organization
,
will
march
to
San
Francisco
for
a
rally
in
Union
Square
at
2
p.m.
Saturday
.
In
a
letter
to
the
American
Friends
Service
,
Dr.
Schweitzer
wrote
:
``
Leading
Nations
of
the
West
and
of
the
East
keep
busy
making
newer
nuclear
weapons
to
defend
themselves
in
the
event
the
constantly
threatening
nuclear
war
should
break
out
.
``
They
cannot
do
otherwise
than
live
in
dread
of
each
other
since
these
weapons
imply
the
possibility
of
such
grisly
surprise
attack
.
The
only
way
out
of
this
state
of
affairs
is
agreement
to
abolish
nuclear
weapons
;
;
otherwise
no
peace
is
possible
.
``
Governments
apparently
do
not
feel
obligated
to
make
the
people
adequately
aware
of
this
danger
;
;
therefore
we
need
guardians
to
demonstrate
against
the
ghastly
stupidity
of
nuclear
weapons
and
jolt
the
people
out
of
their
complacency
''
.
A
federal
grand
jury
called
10
witnesses
yesterday
in
an
investigation
of
the
affairs
of
Ben
Stein
,
47
,
who
collected
big
fees
as
a
``
labor
consultant
''
and
operator
of
a
janitors'
service
.
Before
he
testified
for
20
minutes
,
Stein
,
who
lives
at
3300
Lake
Shore
Dr.
,
admitted
to
reporters
that
he
had
a
wide
acquaintance
with
crime
syndicate
hoodlums
.
Glimco
a
buddy
Among
his
gangland
buddies
,
he
said
,
were
Joseph
(
Joey
)
Glimco
,
a
mob
labor
racketeer
,
and
four
gang
gambling
chiefs
,
Gus
(
Slim
)
Alex
,
Ralph
Pierce
,
Joe
(
Caesar
)
DiVarco
,
and
Jimmy
(
Monk
)
Allegretti
.
Another
hoodlum
,
Louis
Arger
,
drew
$39,000
from
Stein's
janitor
firm
,
the
National
Maintenance
company
,
in
three
years
ending
in
1959
,
Stein
disclosed
in
an
interview
.
``
I
put
Arger
on
the
payroll
because
he
promised
to
get
my
firm
the
stevedore
account
at
Navy
pier
''
,
Stein
said
.
``
But
Arger
never
was
able
to
produce
it
,
so
I
cut
him
off
my
payroll
''
.
Connection
is
sought
Other
witnesses
,
after
appearances
before
the
jury
,
which
reportedly
is
probing
into
possible
income
tax
violations
,
disclosed
that
government
prosecutors
were
attempting
to
connect
Stein
and
his
company
with
a
number
of
gangsters
,
including
Glimco
and
Alex
.
The
federal
lawyers
,
according
to
their
witnesses
,
also
were
tracing
Stein's
fees
as
a
labor
consultant
.
Under
scrutiny
,
two
of
the
witnesses
said
,
were
payments
and
loans
to
Stein's
National
Maintenance
company
at
543
Madison
St.
.
The
company
supplies
janitors
and
workmen
for
McCormick
Place
and
factories
,
liquor
firms
,
and
other
businesses
.
Lee
a
witness
Among
the
witnesses
were
Ed
J.
Lee
,
director
of
McCormick
Place
;
;
Jerome
Leavitt
,
a
partner
in
the
Union
Liquor
company
,
3247
S.
Kedzie
Av.
,
Dominic
Senese
,
a
teamster
union
slugger
who
is
a
buddy
of
Stein
and
a
cousin
of
Tony
Accardo
,
onetime
gang
chief
;
;
and
Frank
W.
Pesce
,
operator
of
a
Glimco
dominated
deodorant
firm
,
the
Best
Sanitation
and
Supply
company
,
1215
Blue
Island
Av.
.
Lee
said
he
had
told
the
jury
that
he
made
an
agreement
in
April
with
Stein
to
supply
and
supervise
janitors
in
McCormick
Place
.
Stein's
fee
,
Lee
said
,
was
10
per
cent
of
the
janitors'
pay
.
Stein
estimated
this
amount
at
``
about
$1,500
or
$1,600
a
month
''
.
A
$12,500
payment
Leavitt
,
as
he
entered
the
jury
room
,
said
he
was
prepared
to
answer
questions
about
the
$12,500
his
liquor
firm
paid
to
Stein
for
``
labor
consultant
work
''
with
five
unions
which
organized
Leavitt's
workers
.
Leavitt
identified
the
unions
as
a
warehouseman's
local
,
the
teamsters
union
,
a
salesman's
union
,
the
janitors'
union
,
and
a
bottling
workers'
union
.
Government
attorneys
,
Leavitt
said
,
have
questioned
him
closely
about
``
five
or
six
loans
''
totaling
about
$40,000
which
the
liquor
company
made
to
Stein
in
the
last
year
.
All
of
the
loans
,
in
amounts
up
to
$5,000
each
,
have
been
repaid
by
Stein
,
according
to
Leavitt
.
Stein
said
he
needed
the
money
,
Leavitt
said
,
to
``
meet
the
payroll
''
at
National
Maintenance
company
.
The
deodorant
firm
run
by
Pesce
has
offices
in
the
headquarters
of
Glimco's
discredited
taxi
drivers'
union
at
1213-15
Blue
Island
Av.
.
The
radiation
station
of
the
Chicago
board
of
health
recorded
a
reading
of
1
micro-microcurie
of
radiation
per
cubic
meter
of
air
over
Chicago
yesterday
.
The
reading
,
which
has
been
watched
with
interest
since
Russia's
detonation
of
a
super
bomb
Monday
,
was
4
on
Tuesday
and
7
last
Saturday
,
a
level
far
below
the
danger
point
,
according
to
the
board
of
health
.
The
weather
bureau
has
estimated
that
radioactive
fallout
from
the
test
might
arrive
here
next
week
.
A
board
of
health
spokesman
said
there
is
no
reason
to
believe
that
an
increase
in
the
level
here
will
occur
as
a
result
of
the
detonation
.
Curtis
Allen
Huff
,
41
,
of
1630
Lake
Av.
,
Wilmette
,
was
arrested
yesterday
on
a
suppressed
federal
warrant
charging
him
with
embezzling
an
undetermined
amount
of
money
from
the
First
Federal
Savings
and
Loan
association
,
1
S.
Dearborn
St.
,
where
he
formerly
was
employed
as
an
attorney
.
Federal
prosecutors
estimated
that
the
amount
may
total
$20,000
,
altho
a
spokesman
for
the
association
estimated
its
loss
at
approximately
$10,000
.
Lien
payments
involved
Huff's
attorney
,
Antone
F.
Gregorio
,
quoted
his
client
as
saying
that
part
of
the
embezzlement
represented
money
paid
to
Huff
,
as
attorney
for
the
loan
association
,
in
satisfaction
of
mechanic's
liens
on
property
on
which
the
association
held
mortgages
.
Huff
told
Gregorio
that
he
took
the
money
to
pay
``
the
ordinary
bills
and
expenses
of
suburban
living
''
.
Huff
,
who
received
a
salary
of
$109
a
week
from
the
loan
association
from
October
of
1955
until
September
of
this
year
,
said
that
his
private
practice
was
not
lucrative
.
Huff
lives
with
his
wife
,
Sue
,
and
their
four
children
,
6
to
10
years
old
,
in
a
$25,000
home
with
a
$17,000
mortgage
.
Charge
lists
3
checks
The
complaint
on
which
the
warrant
was
issued
was
filed
by
Leo
Blaber
,
an
attorney
for
the
association
.
The
shortage
was
discovered
after
Huff
failed
to
report
for
work
on
Sept.
18
.
On
that
date
,
according
to
Gregorio
,
Huff
left
his
home
and
took
a
room
in
the
New
Lawrence
hotel
at
1020
Lawrence
Av.
.
There
,
Gregorio
said
,
Huff
wrote
a
complete
statement
of
his
offense
.
Later
,
Huff
cashed
three
checks
for
$100
each
at
the
Sherman
House
,
using
a
credit
card
.
All
bounced
.
When
Huff
attempted
to
cash
another
$100
check
there
Monday
,
hotel
officials
called
police
.
Bonn
,
Oct.
24
(
UPI
)
--
Greece
and
West
Germany
have
ratified
an
agreement
under
which
Germany
will
pay
$28,700,000
to
Greek
victims
of
Nazi
persecution
,
it
was
announced
today
.
Probably
the
hottest
thing
that
has
hit
the
Dallas
investment
community
in
years
was
the
Morton
Foods
stock
issue
,
which
was
sold
to
the
public
during
the
past
week
.
For
many
reasons
,
the
demand
to
buy
shares
in
the
Dallas-headquartered
company
was
tremendous
.
It
was
not
a
case
of
the
investment
bankers
having
to
sell
the
stock
;
;
it
was
more
one
of
allotting
a
few
shares
to
a
number
of
customers
and
explaining
to
others
why
they
had
no
more
to
sell
.
Investors
who
wanted
100
shares
in
many
cases
ended
up
with
25
,
and
customers
who
had
put
in
a
bid
to
buy
400
shares
found
themselves
with
100
and
counted
themselves
lucky
to
get
that
many
.
In
fact
,
very
few
customers
,
anywhere
in
the
nation
,
were
able
to
get
more
than
100
shares
.
Some
Dallas
investment
firms
got
only
100
shares
,
for
all
of
their
customers
.
A
measure
of
how
hot
the
stock
was
,
can
be
found
in
what
happened
to
it
on
the
market
as
soon
as
trading
began
.
The
stock
was
sold
in
the
underwriting
at
a
price
of
$12.50
a
share
.
The
first
over-the-counter
trade
Wednesday
afternoon
at
Eppler
,
Guerin
&
Turner
,
the
managing
underwriter
,
was
at
$17
a
share
.
And
from
that
the
stock
moved
right
on
up
until
it
was
trading
Thursday
morning
at
around
$22
a
share
.
But
the
Morton
Foods
issue
was
hot
long
before
it
was
on
the
market
.
Indeed
,
from
the
moment
the
reports
of
the
coming
issue
first
started
circulating
in
Dallas
last
January
,
the
inquiries
and
demand
for
the
stock
started
building
up
.
Letters
by
the
reams
came
in
from
investment
firms
all
over
the
nation
,
all
of
them
wanting
to
get
a
part
of
the
shares
that
would
be
sold
(
185,000
to
the
public
at
$12.50
,
with
another
5,000
reserved
for
Morton
Foods
employes
at
$11.50
a
share
)
.
There
was
even
a
cable
in
French
from
a
bank
in
Switzerland
that
had
somehow
learned
about
the
Dallas
stock
offering
.
``
We
subscribe
500
shares
of
Morton
Foods
of
Texas
.
Cable
confirmation
''
,
it
said
translated
.
But
E.G.T.
could
not
let
the
Swiss
bank
have
even
10
shares
.
After
it
allotted
shares
to
41
underwriters
and
52
selling
group
members
from
coast
to
coast
there
were
not
many
shares
for
anyone
.
But
the
result
of
it
all
was
,
E.G.T.
partner
Dean
Guerin
believes
,
an
effective
distribution
of
the
stock
to
owners
all
over
the
nation
.
``
I
feel
confident
the
stock
will
qualify
for
the
'
national
list
'
''
,
he
said
,
meaning
its
market
price
would
be
quoted
regularly
in
newspapers
all
over
the
country
.
He
was
also
pleased
with
the
wide
distribution
because
he
thought
it
proved
again
his
argument
that
Dallas
investment
men
can
do
just
as
good
a
job
as
the
big
New
York
investment
bankers
claim
only
they
can
do
.
But
what
made
the
Morton
Foods
stock
issue
such
a
hot
one
?
?
The
answer
is
that
it
was
a
combination
of
circumstances
.
First
,
the
general
stock
market
has
been
boiling
upward
for
the
last
few
months
,
driving
stocks
of
all
kinds
up
.
As
a
result
,
it
is
not
easy
to
find
a
stock
priced
as
the
Morton
issue
was
priced
(
at
roughly
10
times
1960
earnings
,
to
yield
a
little
over
5
per
cent
on
the
64-cent
anticipated
dividend
)
.
Second
,
the
``
potato
chip
industry
''
has
caught
the
fancy
of
investors
lately
,
and
until
Morton
Foods
came
along
there
were
only
two
potato
chip
stocks
--
Frito
and
H.
W.
Lay
--
on
the
market
.
Both
of
those
have
had
dynamic
run-ups
in
price
on
the
market
in
recent
months
,
both
were
selling
at
higher
price-earnings
and
yield
bases
than
Morton
was
coming
to
market
at
,
and
everyone
who
knew
anything
about
it
expected
the
Morton
stock
to
have
a
fast
run-up
.
And
third
,
the
potato
chip
industry
has
taken
on
the
flavor
of
a
``
growth
''
industry
in
the
public
mind
of
late
.
Foods
,
which
long
had
been
considered
``
recession
resistant
''
but
hardly
dynamic
stocks
,
have
been
acting
like
growth
stocks
,
going
to
higher
price-earnings
ratios
.
The
potato
chip
industry
these
days
is
growing
,
not
only
as
a
result
of
population
increase
and
public
acceptance
of
convenience
foods
,
but
also
because
of
a
combination
of
circumstances
that
has
led
to
growth
by
merger
.
The
history
of
the
U.S.
potato
chip
industry
is
that
many
of
today's
successful
companies
got
started
during
the
deep
depression
days
.
Those
that
remain
are
those
that
were
headed
by
strong
executives
,
men
with
the
abilities
to
last
almost
30
years
in
the
competitive
survival
of
the
fittest
.
But
today
many
of
those
men
are
reaching
retirement
age
and
suddenly
realizing
that
they
face
an
estate
tax
problem
with
their
closely
held
companies
and
also
that
they
have
no
second-echelon
management
in
their
firms
.
So
they
go
looking
for
mergers
with
other
firms
that
have
publicly
quoted
stock
,
and
almost
daily
they
pound
on
the
doors
of
firms
like
Frito
.
All
those
things
combined
to
make
the
Morton
Foods
stock
the
hot
issue
that
it
was
and
is
.
Now
,
if
Morton's
newest
product
,
a
corn
chip
known
as
Chip-o's
,
turns
out
to
sell
as
well
as
its
stock
did
,
the
stock
may
turn
out
to
be
worth
every
cent
of
the
prices
that
the
avid
buyers
bid
it
up
to
.
Dallas
and
North
Texas
is
known
world-wide
as
the
manufacturing
and
distribution
center
of
cotton
gin
machinery
and
supplies
,
valued
in
the
millions
of
dollars
.
More
than
10
companies
maintain
facilities
in
Dallas
and
one
large
manufacturer
is
located
to
the
north
at
Sherman
.
It
is
no
coincidence
that
the
Texas
Cotton
Ginner's
Association
is
meeting
here
this
week
for
the
46th
time
in
their
52-year
history
.
The
exhibition
of
cotton
ginning
machinery
at
the
State
Fair
grounds
is
valued
at
more
than
a
million
dollars
.
It
weighs
in
the
tons
,
so
the
proximity
of
factory
and
exhibition
area
makes
it
possible
for
an
outstanding
exhibit
each
year
.
A
modern
cotton
gin
plant
costs
in
the
neighborhood
of
$250,000
,
and
it's
a
safe
assumption
that
a
large
percentage
of
new
gins
in
the
U.S.
and
foreign
countries
contain
machinery
made
in
this
area
.
The
Murray
Co.
of
Texas
,
Inc.
,
originated
in
Dallas
in
1896
.
They've
occupied
a
22-acre
site
since
the
early
1900's
.
More
than
700
employees
make
gin
machinery
that's
sold
anywhere
cotton
is
grown
.
Murray
makes
a
complete
line
of
ginning
equipment
except
for
driers
and
cleaners
,
and
this
machinery
is
purchased
from
a
Dallas-based
firm
.
The
Continental
Gin
Co.
began
operations
in
Dallas
in
1899
.
The
present
company
is
a
combination
of
several
smaller
ones
that
date
back
to
1834
.
Headquarters
is
in
Birmingham
,
Ala.
.
Factories
are
located
here
and
in
Prattville
,
Ala.
.
About
40
per
cent
of
the
manufacturing
is
done
at
the
Dallas
plant
by
more
than
200
employes
.
The
company
sells
a
complete
line
of
gin
machinery
all
over
the
cotton-growing
world
.
Hardwicke-Etter
Co.
of
Sherman
makes
a
full
line
of
gin
machinery
and
equipment
.
The
firm
recently
expanded
domestic
sales
into
the
Southeastern
states
as
a
result
of
an
agreement
with
Cen-Tennial
Gin
Co.
.
They
export
also
.
The
company
began
operation
in
1900
with
hardware
and
oil
mill
supplies
.
In
1930
,
they
began
making
cotton
processing
equipment
.
Presently
,
Hardwicke-Etter
employs
300-450
people
,
depending
on
the
season
of
the
year
.
The
Lummus
Cotton
Gin
Co.
has
had
a
sales
and
service
office
in
Dallas
since
1912
.
Factory
operations
are
in
Columbus
,
Ga.
.
The
district
office
here
employs
about
65
.
The
Moss
Gordin
Lint
Cleaner
Co.
and
Gordin
Unit
System
of
Ginning
have
joint
headquarters
here
.
The
cleaner
equipment
firm
began
operations
in
1953
and
the
unit
system
,
which
turns
out
a
complete
ginning
system
,
began
operations
in
1959
.
Gordin
manufacturing
operations
are
in
Lubbock
.
The
John
E.
Mitchell
Co.
began
work
in
Dallas
in
1928
.
The
firm
is
prominent
in
making
equipment
for
cleaning
seed
cotton
,
driers
,
and
heaters
,
and
they
lay
claim
to
being
the
first
maker
(
1910
)
of
boil
extraction
equipment
.
The
increase
in
mechanical
harvesting
of
cotton
makes
cleaning
and
drying
equipment
a
must
for
modern
gin
operation
.
Mitchell
employs
a
total
of
about
400
people
.
They
export
cotton
ginning
machinery
.
The
Hinckley
Gin
Supply
Co.
is
a
maker
of
``
overhead
equipment
''
.
This
includes
driers
,
cleaners
,
burr
extractors
,
separators
and
piping
that's
located
above
gin
stands
in
a
complete
gin
.
The
firm
began
operations
back
in
1925
and
sells
equipment
in
the
central
cotton
belt
,
including
the
Mississippi
Delta
.
The
Cen-Tennial
Gin
Supply
Co.
has
home
offices
and
factory
facilities
here
.
They
make
gin
saws
and
deal
in
parts
,
supplies
and
some
used
gin
machinery
.
The
Stacy
Co.
makes
cleaning
and
drying
equipment
for
sale
largely
in
Texas
.
They've
been
in
Dallas
since
1921
.
Cotton
Belt
Gin
Service
,
Inc.
of
Dallas
makes
gin
saws
and
started
here
14
years
ago
.
They
distribute
equipment
in
11
states
.
The
firm
also
handles
gin
and
oil
mill
supplies
such
as
belting
,
bearings
,
etc.
.
Cotton
processing
equipment
is
a
sizable
segment
of
Dallas
business
economy
.
New
car
sales
in
Dallas
County
during
March
showed
slight
signs
of
recovering
from
the
doldrums
which
have
characterized
sales
this
year
.
Registrations
of
new
cars
in
Dallas
County
cracked
the
3,000
mark
in
March
for
the
first
time
this
year
.
Totaling
3,399
,
sales
jumped
14
per
cent
over
February's
2,963
.
However
,
compared
with
March
1960
new
car
sales
of
4,441
,
this
March
was
off
23
per
cent
.
On
a
quarter-to-quarter
comparison
,
the
first
quarter
of
1961
total
of
9,273
cars
was
21
per
cent
behind
the
previous
year's
3-month
total
of
11,744
.
This
year-to-year
decline
for
Dallas
County
closely
follows
the
national
trend
--
estimated
sales
of
domestic
cars
in
the
U.S.
for
first
three
months
of
1961
were
about
1,212,000
or
80
per
cent
of
the
total
in
the
first
quarter
a
year
earlier
.
With
the
March
pickup
,
dealers
are
optimistic
that
the
April-June
quarter
will
equal
or
top
last
year
.
The
March
gain
plus
this
optimism
has
been
encouraging
enough
to
prompt
auto
makers
to
boost
production
schedules
for
the
next
quarter
.
On
the
local
level
,
compacts
continue
to
grab
a
larger
share
of
the
market
at
the
expense
of
lower-priced
standard
models
and
foreign
cars
.
Only
three
standard
models
--
Buick
,
Chrysler
,
and
Mercury
--
had
slight
year-to-year
gains
in
March
sales
in
the
county
.
The
top
3
students
from
11
participating
Dallas
County
high
schools
will
be
honored
by
the
Dallas
Sales
Executives
Club
at
a
banquet
at
6
p.m.
Tuesday
in
the
Sam
Houston
Room
of
the
Sheraton-Dallas
Hotel
as
the
club
winds
up
its
annual
Distributive
Education
project
.
Now
in
its
third
year
,
the
program
is
designed
to
provide
a
laboratory
for
those
youngsters
seeking
careers
in
marketing
and
salesmanship
.
Business
firms
provide
20
weeks
of
practical
employment
to
supplement
classroom
instruction
in
these
fields
.
More
than
500
juniors
and
seniors
are
taking
part
in
the
program
and
100
firms
offer
jobs
on
an
educational
rather
than
a
need
basis
.
Principal
address
will
be
delivered
by
Gerald
T.
Owens
,
national
sales
manager
for
Isodine
Pharmical
Corp.
of
New
York
.
The
33
honored
students
are
:
Mike
Trigg
,
Raymond
Arrington
,
and
Ronald
Kaminsky
of
Bryan
Adams
,
Janice
Whitney
,
Fil
Terral
,
and
Carl
David
Page
of
W.
H.
Adamson
;
;
Bill
Burke
,
Tommie
Freeman
,
and
Lawrence
Paschall
of
N.
R.
Crozier
Tech.
Paulah
Thompson
,
Gerald
Kestner
,
and
Nancy
Stephenson
of
Hillcrest
;
;
Arnold
Hayes
,
Mary
Ann
Shay
,
and
Lloyd
Satterfield
of
Thomas
Jefferson
;
;
William
Cluck
,
Deloris
Carrel
Carty
,
and
Edna
Earl
Eaton
of
North
Dallas
;
;
Patricia
Ann
Neal
,
Johnny
Carruthers
,
and
David
McLauchlin
of
Rylie
of
Seagoville
;
;
David
Wolverton
,
Sharon
Flanagan
,
and
James
Weaver
of
W.
W.
Samuels
;
;
William
Austin
,
Gary
Hammond
,
and
Ronnie
Davis
of
South
Oak
Cliff
;
;
Bill
Eaton
,
Carolyn
Milton
,
and
Ronnie
Bert
Stone
of
Sunset
;
;
and
Charles
Potter
,
Ronnie
Moore
,
and
Robert
Bailey
of
Woodrow
Wilson
.
The
Kennedy
administration's
new
housing
and
urban
renewal
proposals
,
particularly
their
effect
on
the
Federal
Housing
Administration
,
came
under
fire
in
Dallas
last
week
.
The
Administration's
proposals
,
complex
and
sweeping
as
they
are
,
all
deal
with
fringe
areas
of
the
housing
market
rather
than
its
core
,
stated
Caron
S.
Stallard
,
first
vice-president
of
the
Mortgage
Bankers
Association
of
America
.
Santa
Barbara
--
``
The
present
recovery
movement
will
gather
steady
momentum
to
lift
the
economy
to
a
new
historic
peak
by
this
autumn
''
,
Beryl
W.
Sprinkel
,
economist
of
Harris
Trust
&
Savings
Bank
,
Chicago
,
predicted
at
the
closing
session
here
Tuesday
of
Investment
Bankers
Assn.
,
California
group
,
conference
.
Another
speaker
,
William
H.
Draper
,
Jr.
,
former
Under
Secretary
of
the
Army
and
now
with
the
Palo
Alto
venture
capital
firm
of
Draper
,
Gaither
&
Anderson
,
urged
the
U.S.
to
``
throw
down
the
gauntlet
of
battle
to
communism
and
tell
Moscow
bluntly
we
won't
be
pushed
around
any
more
''
.
He
urged
support
for
President
Kennedy's
requests
for
both
defense
and
foreign
aid
appropriations
.
'
not
flash
in
pan
'
Sprinkel
told
conferees
that
the
recent
improvement
in
economic
activity
was
not
a
``
temporary
flash
in
the
pan
''
but
the
beginning
of
a
substantial
cyclical
expansion
that
will
carry
the
economy
back
to
full
employment
levels
and
witness
a
renewal
of
our
traditional
growth
pattern
.
``
In
view
of
the
current
expansion
,
which
promises
to
be
substantial
''
he
said
the
odds
appear
to
favor
rising
interest
rates
in
coming
months
,
but
``
there
is
reason
to
believe
the
change
will
not
be
as
abrupt
as
in
1958
nor
as
severe
as
in
late
1959
and
1960
''
.
Thesis
refuted
Sprinkel
strongly
refuted
the
current
neo-stagnationist
thesis
that
we
are
facing
a
future
of
limited
and
slow
growth
,
declaring
that
this
pessimism
``
is
based
on
very
limited
and
questionable
evidence
''
.
Rather
than
viewing
the
abortive
recovery
in
1959-60
as
a
reason
for
believing
we
have
lost
prospects
for
growth
''
,
he
said
``
it
should
be
viewed
as
a
lesson
well
learned
which
will
increase
the
probability
of
substantial
improvement
in
this
recovery
''
.
Danger
cited
He
cautioned
that
``
the
greater
danger
in
this
recovery
may
be
excessive
stimulation
by
government
which
could
bring
moderate
inflation
''
.
The
economist
does
not
look
for
a
drastic
switch
in
the
budget
during
this
recovery
and
believes
it
``
even
more
unlikely
that
the
Federal
Reserve
will
aggressively
tighten
monetary
policy
in
the
early
phases
of
the
upturn
as
was
the
case
in
1958
''
.
The
unsatisfactory
1958-60
expansion
,
he
said
,
was
not
due
to
inadequate
growth
forces
inherent
in
our
economy
but
rather
to
the
adverse
effect
of
inappropriate
economic
policies
combined
with
retrenching
decisions
resulting
from
the
steel
strike
.
Sacrifices
needed
Draper
declared
,
``
As
I
see
it
,
this
country
has
never
faced
such
great
dangers
as
threaten
us
today
.
We
must
justify
our
heritage
.
We
must
be
ready
for
any
needed
sacrifice
''
.
He
said
that
from
his
experience
of
two
years
with
Gen.
Clay
in
West
Berlin
administration
,
that
``
Russia
respects
our
show
of
strength
,
but
that
presently
we're
not
acting
as
we
should
and
must
''
.
He
called
the
Cuban
tractor
plan
an
outright
blackmail
action
,
and
noted
that
in
war
``
you
can't
buy
yourself
out
and
that's
what
we're
trying
to
do
''
.
While
he
declined
to
suggest
,
how
,
he
said
that
sooner
or
later
we
must
get
rid
of
Castro
,
``
for
unless
we
do
we're
liable
to
face
similar
situations
in
this
hemisphere
.
Its
the
start
of
a
direct
threat
to
our
own
security
and
I
don't
believe
we
can
permit
that
''
.
New
York
(
AP
)
--
Stock
market
Tuesday
staged
a
technical
recovery
,
erasing
all
of
Monday's
losses
in
the
Associated
Press
average
and
making
the
largest
gain
in
about
two
weeks
.
Analysts
saw
the
move
as
a
continuation
of
the
recovery
drive
that
got
under
way
late
Monday
afternoon
when
the
list
sank
to
a
hoped-for
``
support
level
''
represented
by
around
675
in
the
Dow
Jones
industrial
average
.
It
was
a
level
at
which
some
of
the
investors
standing
on
the
sidelines
were
thought
likely
to
buy
the
pivotal
issues
represented
in
the
averages
.
Some
good
news
Although
it
looked
like
a
routine
technical
snapback
to
Wall
Streeters
it
was
accompanied
by
some
good
news
.
A
substantial
rise
in
new
orders
and
sales
of
durable
goods
was
reported
for
last
month
.
Treasury
Secretary
Douglas
Dillon
said
the
economy
is
expected
to
advance
by
a
whopping
8%
next
year
,
paving
the
way
for
lower
taxes
.
The
Dow
Jones
industrial
average
advanced
7.19
to
687.87
.
Of
1,253
issues
traded
,
695
advanced
and
354
declined
.
New
highs
for
the
year
totaled
nine
and
new
lows
14
.
Trading
was
comparatively
dull
throughout
the
day
.
Volume
dipped
to
3.28
million
shares
from
3.98
million
Monday
.
A
$25
billion
advertising
budget
in
an
$800
billion
economy
was
envisioned
for
the
1970s
here
Tuesday
by
Peter
G.
Peterson
,
head
of
one
of
the
world's
greatest
camera
firms
,
in
a
key
address
before
the
American
Marketing
Assn.
.
However
,
Peterson
,
president
of
Bell
&
Howell
,
warned
800
U.S.
marketing
leaders
attending
a
national
conference
at
the
Ambassador
,
that
the
future
will
belong
to
the
industrialist
of
creative
and
``
unconventional
wisdom
''
.
Creations
needed
``
As
we
look
to
the
$800
billion
economy
that
is
predicted
for
1970
and
the
increase
of
about
40%
in
consumer
expenditures
that
will
be
required
to
reach
that
goal
,
management
can
well
be
restless
about
how
this
tremendous
volume
and
number
of
new
products
will
be
created
and
marketed
''
,
Peterson
said
.
``
With
this
kind
of
new
product
log-jam
,
the
premium
for
brilliant
product
planning
will
obviously
go
up
geometrically
''
.
The
executive
paid
tribute
to
research
and
development
and
technology
for
their
great
contributions
in
the
past
,
but
he
also
cautioned
industry
that
they
tend
to
be
great
equalizers
because
they
move
at
a
fairly
even
pace
within
an
industry
and
fail
to
give
it
the
short-term
advantage
which
it
often
needs
.
Nothing
to
fear
Peterson
said
America
has
nothing
to
fear
in
world
competition
if
it
dares
to
be
original
in
both
marketing
and
product
ideas
.
He
cited
,
as
an
example
,
how
the
American
camera
industry
has
been
able
to
meet
successfully
the
competition
of
Japan
despite
lower
Japanese
labor
costs
,
by
improving
its
production
know-how
and
technology
.
He
also
used
as
an
example
the
manufacturer
who
introduced
an
all-automatic
camera
in
Germany
,
with
the
result
that
it
became
the
best
selling
camera
in
the
German
market
.
Election
of
Howard
L.
Taylor
to
membership
in
Pacific
Coast
Stock
Exchange
,
effective
Tuesday
,
has
been
announced
by
Thomas
P.
Phelan
,
president
of
the
exchange
.
Taylor
,
president
and
voting
stockholder
of
Taylor
and
Co.
,
Beverly
Hills
,
has
been
active
in
the
securities
business
since
1925
.
Union
Oil
Co.
of
California
Tuesday
offered
$120
million
in
debentures
to
the
public
through
a
group
of
underwriters
headed
by
Dillon
,
Read
&
Co.
,
to
raise
money
to
retire
a
similar
amount
held
by
Gulf
Oil
Corp.
.
Gulf's
holdings
could
have
been
converted
into
2,700,877
shares
of
Union
Oil
common
upon
surrender
of
debentures
plus
cash
,
according
to
Union
.
Under
the
new
offering
,
only
$60
million
in
debentures
are
convertible
into
923,076
common
shares
.
Due
in
1986
The
new
offering
Tuesday
consisted
of
$60
million
worth
of
4-7/8
debentures
,
due
June
1
,
1986
,
at
100%
,
and
$60
million
of
4-1/2%
convertible
subordinated
debentures
due
June
1
,
1991
,
at
100%
.
The
convertible
debentures
are
convertible
into
common
shares
at
$65
a
share
by
June
1
,
1966
;
;
$70
by
1971
;
;
$75
by
1976
;
;
$80
by
1981
;
;
$85
by
1986
,
and
$90
thereafter
.
New
York
(
AP
)
--
American
Stock
Exchange
prices
enjoyed
a
fairly
solid
rise
but
here
also
trading
dwindled
.
Volume
was
1.23
million
shares
,
down
from
Monday's
1.58
million
.
Gains
of
2-3/4
were
posted
for
Teleprompter
and
Republic
Foil
.
Fairchild
Camera
and
Kawecki
Chemical
gained
2-1/2
each
.
Question
--
I
bought
50
shares
of
Diversified
Growth
Stock
Fund
on
Oct.
23
,
1959
,
and
50
more
shares
of
the
same
mutual
fund
on
Feb.
8
,
1960
.
Something
has
gone
wrong
some
place
.
I
am
getting
dividends
on
only
50
shares
.
In
other
words
,
I
am
getting
only
half
the
dividends
I
should
.
Answer
--
Write
to
the
fund's
custodian
bank
--
the
First
National
Bank
of
Jersey
City
,
N.J.
.
That
bank
handles
most
of
the
paper
work
for
Diversified
Growth
Stock
Fund
,
Fundamental
Investors
,
Diversified
Investment
Fund
and
Television-Electronics
Fund
.
The
bank
installed
a
magnetic
tape
electronic
data
processing
system
to
handle
things
.
But
it
seems
that
this
``
electronic
brain
''
wasn't
``
programmed
''
correctly
.
This
resulted
in
a
great
number
of
errors
.
And
letters
began
to
come
in
to
this
column
from
irate
shareholders
.
I
visited
the
bank
in
March
and
wrote
a
story
about
the
situation
.
At
that
time
,
the
people
at
the
bank
said
they
felt
that
they
had
the
situation
in
hand
.
They
indicated
that
no
new
errors
were
being
made
and
that
all
old
errors
would
be
corrected
``
within
60
days
''
.
That
60-day
period
is
over
and
letters
are
still
coming
in
from
shareholders
of
these
four
funds
,
complaining
about
mistakes
in
their
accounts
.
Maybe
it's
taking
longer
to
get
things
squared
away
than
the
bankers
expected
.
Any
shareholder
of
any
of
these
funds
who
finds
a
mistake
in
his
account
certainly
should
get
in
touch
with
the
bank
.
Doyle
cannot
undertake
to
reply
to
inquiries
.
He
selects
queries
or
general
interest
to
answer
.
Washington
(
AP
)
--
Alfred
Hayes
,
president
of
the
Federal
Reserve
Bank
of
New
York
,
said
Tuesday
``
there
is
no
present
need
for
far-reaching
reforms
''
which
would
basically
alter
the
international
financial
system
.
Hayes
said
that
if
a
way
can
be
found
to
deal
effectively
with
short-term
capital
movements
between
nations
,
``
there
is
no
reason
,
in
my
judgment
why
the
international
financial
system
cannot
work
satisfactorily
for
at
least
the
foreseeable
future
''
.
Washington
(
UPI
)
--
New
York
Central
Railroad
president
Alfred
E.
Perlman
said
Tuesday
his
line
would
face
the
threat
of
bankruptcy
if
the
Chesapeake
&
Ohio
and
Baltimore
&
Ohio
Railroads
merge
.
Perlman
said
bankruptcy
would
not
be
an
immediate
effect
of
the
merger
,
but
could
possibly
be
an
ultimate
effect
.
The
railroad
president
made
the
statement
in
an
interview
as
the
Interstate
Commerce
Commission
opened
Round
2
of
its
hearing
into
the
C
&
O's
request
to
control
and
then
merge
with
the
B
&
Aj
.
``
All
these
kind
of
things
weaken
us
''
,
Perlman
said
.
Bad
condition
Board
Chairman
Howard
Simpson
of
the
Baltimore
&
Ohio
Railroad
Co.
,
testified
the
B
&
O
was
in
its
worst
financial
condition
since
the
depression
years
and
badly
needed
the
economic
lift
it
would
get
from
consolidation
with
the
Chesapeake
&
Ohio
Railroad
.
``
The
financial
situation
of
the
Baltimore
&
Ohio
,
has
become
precarious
--
much
worse
than
at
any
time
since
the
depression
of
the
1930s
''
,
he
told
the
hearing
.
C
&
O
president
Walter
J.
Tuohy
was
summoned
back
for
cross-examination
by
New
York
Central
attorneys
before
examiner
John
Bradford
who
is
hearing
the
complex
case
.
The
New
York
Central
also
has
asked
the
ICC
to
permit
it
to
gain
control
of
the
B
&
Aj
.
Central
was
rebuffed
by
the
other
two
railroads
in
previous
attempts
to
make
it
a
three-way
merger
.
The
proposed
C
&
O-B
&
O
railroad
would
make
it
the
hemisphere's
second
largest
.
Washington
(
AP
)
--
The
government's
short-term
borrowing
costs
rose
with
Tuesday's
weekly
offering
of
Treasury
bills
.
On
$1.1
billion
of
90-day
bills
,
the
average
yield
was
2.325%
.
The
rate
a
week
ago
was
2.295%
.
Washington
,
March
11
(
UPI
)
.
--
``
Consumer
uncertain
about
economic
conditions
''
.
This
was
the
chief
reason
for
a
so-so
sales
outlook
given
by
two-thirds
of
56
builders
polled
by
the
National
Housing
Center
.
Other
reasons
mentioned
by
one-third
or
more
of
the
builders
were
``
resistance
to
high
interest
rates
,
cost
advantage
of
buying
over
renting
has
narrowed
,
shelter
market
nearing
saturation
and
prospects
unable
to
qualify
''
.
Increase
expected
The
poll
was
taken
at
the
Center's
annual
builders'
intentions
conference
.
It
disclosed
that
the
builders
:
Expect
their
own
production
volume
,
and
presumably
sales
,
to
jump
30
percent
in
1961
.
Look
for
home
building
nationally
to
advance
less
than
10
percent
this
year
from
1960's
1,257,700
non-farm
housing
starts
.
The
industry
has
said
1960
was
a
poor
year
.
Starts
were
down
20
percent
from
1959
.
Why
the
discrepancy
between
the
builders'
forecasts
for
themselves
and
for
the
industry
?
?
Leaders
of
industry
The
reason
,
says
the
Housing
Center
,
is
that
the
builders
invited
to
the
intentions
conference
``
are
generally
among
the
more
successful
businessmen
,
and
usually
do
somewhat
better
than
their
fellow
builders
''
.
Elburn
,
Ill.
--
Farm
machinery
dealer
Bob
Houtz
tilts
back
in
a
battered
chair
and
tells
of
a
sharp
pickup
in
sales
:
``
We've
sold
four
corn
pickers
since
Labor
Day
and
have
good
prospects
for
10
more
.
We
sold
only
four
pickers
all
last
year
''
.
Gus
Ehlers
,
competitor
of
Mr.
Houtz
in
this
farm
community
,
says
his
business
since
August
1
is
running
50%
above
a
year
earlier
.
``
Before
then
,
my
sales
during
much
of
the
year
had
lagged
behind
1960
by
20%
''
,
he
says
.
Though
the
sales
gains
these
two
dealers
are
experiencing
are
above
average
for
their
business
,
farm
equipment
sales
are
climbing
in
most
rural
areas
.
Paradoxically
,
the
sales
rise
is
due
in
large
measure
to
Government
efforts
to
slash
farm
output
.
Although
the
Administration's
program
cut
crop
acreage
to
the
lowest
point
since
1934
,
farmers
,
with
the
help
of
extra
fertilizer
and
good
weather
,
are
getting
such
high
yields
per
acre
that
many
are
being
forced
to
buy
new
harvesting
machines
.
Fields
of
corn
and
some
other
crops
in
many
cases
are
so
dense
that
older
equipment
cannot
handle
them
efficiently
.
The
higher
price
supports
provided
by
the
new
legislation
,
together
with
rising
prices
for
farm
products
,
are
pushing
up
farm
income
,
making
it
possible
for
farmers
to
afford
the
new
machinery
.
Seven
of
the
eight
companies
that
turn
out
full
lines
of
farm
machinery
say
sales
by
their
dealers
since
the
start
of
August
have
shown
gains
averaging
nearly
10%
above
last
year
.
``
In
August
our
dealers
sold
13%
more
farm
machinery
than
a
year
earlier
and
in
September
retail
sales
were
14%
higher
than
last
year
''
,
says
Mark
V.
Keeler
,
farm
equipment
vice
president
of
International
Harvester
Co.
.
For
the
year
to
date
,
sales
of
the
company's
farm
equipment
dealers
still
lag
about
5%
behind
1960
.
Two
of
three
report
gains
Among
individual
dealers
questioned
in
nearly
a
score
of
states
,
two
out
of
three
report
their
sales
since
August
1
show
sizable
gains
from
a
year
earlier
,
with
the
increases
ranging
from
5%
to
50%
.
Not
all
sections
are
showing
an
upswing
,
however
;
;
the
drought-seared
North
Central
states
are
the
most
notable
exceptions
to
the
uptrend
.
The
significance
of
the
pickup
in
farm
machinery
sales
extends
beyond
the
farm
equipment
industry
.
The
demand
for
farm
machinery
is
regarded
as
a
yardstick
of
rural
buying
generally
.
Farmers
spend
more
of
their
income
on
tractors
and
implements
than
on
any
other
group
of
products
.
More
than
20
million
people
live
on
farms
and
they
own
a
fourth
of
the
nation's
trucks
,
buy
more
gasoline
than
any
other
industry
and
provide
a
major
market
for
home
appliances
,
chemicals
and
other
products
.
Farmers
are
so
eager
for
new
machinery
that
they're
haggling
less
over
prices
than
they
did
a
year
ago
,
dealers
report
.
``
Farmers
aren't
as
price
conscious
as
last
year
so
we
can
get
more
money
on
a
sale
''
,
says
Jack
Martin
,
who
sells
J.
I.
Case
tractors
and
implements
in
Sioux
City
,
Iowa
.
``
This
morning
,
we
allowed
a
farmer
$600
on
the
old
picker
he
traded
in
on
a
new
$2,700
model
.
Last
year
,
we
probably
would
have
given
him
$700
for
a
comparable
machine
''
.
Mr.
Martin
sold
21
tractors
in
August
;
;
in
August
of
1960
,
he
sold
seven
.
Dealers'
stocks
down
With
dealer
stocks
of
new
equipment
averaging
about
25%
below
a
year
ago
,
the
affects
of
the
rural
recovery
are
being
felt
almost
immediately
by
the
country's
farm
equipment
manufacturers
.
For
example
,
farm
equipment
shipments
of
International
Harvester
in
August
climbed
about
5%
above
a
year
earlier
,
Mr.
Keeler
reports
.
Tractor
production
at
Massey-Ferguson
,
Ltd.
,
of
Toronto
in
July
and
August
rose
to
2,418
units
from
869
in
the
like
period
a
year
earlier
,
says
John
Staiger
,
vice
president
.
With
the
lower
dealer
inventories
and
the
stepped-up
demand
some
manufacturers
believe
there
could
be
shortages
of
some
implements
.
Merritt
D.
Hill
,
Ford
Motor
Co.
vice
president
,
says
his
company
is
starting
to
get
calls
daily
from
dealers
demanding
immediate
delivery
or
wanting
earlier
shipping
dates
on
orders
for
corn
pickers
.
Except
for
a
few
months
in
late
1960
and
early
1961
,
retail
farm
equipment
sales
have
trailed
year-earlier
levels
since
the
latter
part
of
1959
.
The
rise
in
sales
last
winter
was
checked
when
the
Government's
new
feed
grain
program
was
adopted
;
;
the
program
resulted
in
a
cutback
of
around
20%
in
planted
acreage
and
,
as
a
result
,
reduced
the
immediate
need
for
machines
.
Nearly
all
of
the
farm
equipment
manufacturers
and
dealers
say
the
upturn
in
sales
has
resulted
chiefly
from
the
recent
improvement
in
crop
prospects
.
Total
farm
output
for
this
year
is
officially
forecast
at
129%
of
the
1947-49
average
,
three
points
higher
than
the
July
1
estimate
and
exactly
equal
to
the
final
figure
for
1960
.
The
Government
also
is
aiding
farmers'
income
prospects
.
Agriculture
Department
economists
estimate
the
Government
this
year
will
hand
farmers
$1.4
billion
in
special
subsidies
and
incentive
payments
,
well
above
the
record
$1.1
billion
of
1958
and
about
double
the
$639
million
of
1960
.
Price
support
loans
may
total
another
$1
billion
this
year
.
With
cash
receipts
from
marketings
expected
to
be
slightly
above
1960
,
farmers'
gross
income
is
estimated
at
$39.5
billion
,
$1.5
billion
above
1960's
record
high
.
Net
income
may
reach
$12.7
billion
,
up
$1
billion
from
1960
and
the
highest
since
1953
.
The
Government
reported
last
week
that
the
index
of
prices
received
by
farmers
rose
in
the
month
ended
at
mid-September
for
the
third
consecutive
month
,
reaching
242%
of
the
1910-14
average
compared
with
237%
at
mid-July
.
Kennedy
opposes
any
widespread
relief
from
a
High
Court
depletion
ruling
.
The
Supreme
Court
decision
in
mid-1960
was
in
the
case
of
a
company
making
sewer
pipe
from
clay
which
it
mined
.
The
company
,
in
figuring
its
taxable
earnings
,
deducted
a
percentage
of
the
revenue
it
received
for
its
finished
products
.
Such
``
depletion
allowances
''
,
in
the
form
of
percentages
of
sales
are
authorized
by
tax
law
for
specified
raw
materials
producers
using
up
their
assets
.
The
High
Court
held
that
the
company
must
apply
its
percentage
allowance
to
the
value
of
the
raw
materials
removed
from
the
ground
,
not
to
the
revenue
from
finished
products
.
A
measure
passed
by
Congress
just
before
adjourning
softened
the
ruling's
impact
,
on
prior-year
returns
still
under
review
,
for
clay-mining
companies
that
make
brick
and
tile
products
.
The
measure
allows
such
companies
in
those
years
to
apply
their
mineral
depletion
allowances
to
50%
of
the
value
of
the
finished
products
rather
than
the
lower
value
of
raw
clay
alone
.
President
Kennedy
,
in
signing
the
relief
measure
into
law
,
stressed
he
regarded
it
as
an
exception
.
``
My
approval
of
this
bill
should
not
be
viewed
as
establishing
a
precedent
for
the
enactment
of
similar
legislation
for
other
mineral
industries
''
,
the
President
said
.
Charitable
deductions
come
in
for
closer
scrutiny
by
the
I.R.S.
.
The
Service
announced
that
taxpayers
making
such
claims
may
be
called
on
to
furnish
a
statement
from
the
recipient
organization
showing
the
date
,
purpose
,
amount
and
other
particulars
of
the
contribution
.
Requests
for
substantiation
,
the
Service
indicated
,
can
be
especially
expected
in
cases
where
it
suspects
the
donor
received
some
material
benefit
in
return
,
such
as
tickets
to
a
show
.
In
such
an
instance
,
revenuers
stressed
,
the
deduction
must
be
reduced
by
the
value
of
the
benefit
received
.
A
rule
on
the
Federal
deductibility
of
state
taxes
is
contested
.
A
realty
corporation
in
Louisiana
owed
no
tax
,
under
Federal
law
,
on
its
gain
from
the
sale
of
property
disposed
of
in
line
with
a
plan
of
liquidation
.
Louisiana
,
however
,
collected
an
income
tax
on
the
profits
from
the
sale
.
The
corporation
,
in
filing
its
final
Federal
income
return
,
claimed
the
state
tax
payment
as
a
deductible
expense
,
as
permitted
under
U.S.
tax
law
.
The
Revenue
Service
disallowed
the
claim
,
invoking
a
law
provision
that
generally
bars
deductions
for
expenses
incurred
in
connection
with
what
it
said
was
tax-exempt
income
.
The
Tax
Court
rejected
this
view
.
It
said
the
tax-freedom
of
the
gain
in
this
case
stemmed
not
from
the
exempt
status
of
the
income
but
from
a
special
rule
on
corporate
liquidations
.
The
Tax
Court
decision
and
a
similar
earlier
finding
by
the
Ninth
Circuit
Court
of
Appeals
challenges
a
year-old
I.R.S.
ruling
on
the
subject
.
The
Service
has
not
said
what
its
next
step
will
be
.
Peace
Corps
volunteers
are
assured
a
tax
benefit
under
the
law
creating
the
agency
.
It
provides
that
the
$1,800
termination
payment
each
cadet
is
to
get
,
after
serving
a
two-year
hitch
without
pay
,
will
be
spread
over
both
years
,
not
taxed
in
its
entirety
at
a
possibly
higher
rate
in
the
year
received
.
The
owner
of
a
public
relations
firm
owed
no
income
tax
on
payments
he
received
from
a
client
company
and
``
kicked
back
''
to
the
company's
advertising
manager
,
the
Tax
Court
ruled
.
The
taxpayer
testified
that
in
order
to
retain
the
account
he
had
to
pad
his
invoices
and
pay
the
excess
to
the
manager
.
The
Court
upheld
the
taxpayer's
contention
that
these
``
kickbacks
''
were
not
his
income
though
they
passed
through
his
hands
.
The
Court
limited
its
decision
to
the
tax
issue
involved
,
commenting
:
``
It
is
not
our
province
to
pass
judgment
on
the
morality
of
the
transaction
''
.
A
portable
kerosene
range
designed
for
use
aboard
boats
is
sold
with
a
special
railing
to
keep
it
from
moving
with
the
motion
of
the
vessel
.
The
Revenue
Service
said
the
addition
of
the
attachment
does
not
keep
the
range
from
coming
under
the
Federal
manufacturers'
excise
tax
on
household-type
appliances
.
Hiring
the
wife
for
one's
company
may
win
her
tax-aided
retirement
income
.
A
spouse
employed
by
a
corporation
her
husband
controls
,
for
example
,
may
be
entitled
to
distributions
under
the
company's
pension
plan
as
well
as
to
her
own
Social
Security
coverage
.
She
would
be
taxed
on
the
pensions
when
received
,
of
course
,
but
the
company's
contributions
would
be
tax-free
.
A
frequent
pitfall
in
this
sort
of
arrangement
,
experts
warn
,
is
a
tendency
to
pay
the
wife
more
than
her
job
is
worth
and
to
set
aside
an
excessive
amount
for
her
as
retirement
income
.
In
that
event
,
they
note
,
the
Revenue
Service
might
declare
the
pension
plan
is
discriminatory
and
deny
it
tax
privileges
under
the
law
.
Possible
upshots
:
The
company
could
be
denied
a
deduction
for
its
pension
payments
,
or
those
payments
for
the
wife
and
other
employes
could
be
ruled
taxable
to
them
in
the
year
made
.
State
briefs
:
Voters
in
four
counties
containing
and
bordering
Denver
authorized
the
imposition
of
an
additional
2%
sales
tax
within
that
area
.
Colorado
has
a
2%
sales
tax
.
Denver
itself
collects
a
1%
sales
tax
which
is
to
be
absorbed
in
the
higher
area
tax
.
The
Washington
state
supreme
court
ruled
that
the
state's
occupation
tax
applied
to
sales
,
made
at
cost
to
an
oil
company
,
by
a
wholly-owned
subsidiary
set
up
to
purchase
certain
supplies
without
divulging
the
identity
of
the
parent
.
The
state's
occupation
tax
is
computed
on
gross
sales
.
The
court
held
that
the
tax
applied
to
non-profit
sales
because
the
corporations
realized
economic
benefits
by
doing
business
as
two
separate
entities
.
Washington
--
Consumer
spending
edged
down
in
April
after
rising
for
two
consecutive
months
,
the
Government
reported
.
The
Commerce
Department
said
seasonally
adjusted
sales
of
retail
stores
dropped
to
slightly
under
$18
billion
in
April
,
down
1%
from
the
March
level
of
more
than
$18.2
billion
.
April
sales
also
were
5%
below
those
of
April
last
year
,
when
volume
reached
a
record
for
any
month
,
$18.9
billion
(
see
chart
on
Page
One
)
.
The
seasonal
adjustment
takes
into
account
such
factors
as
Easter
was
on
April
2
this
year
,
two
weeks
earlier
than
in
1960
,
and
pre-Easter
buying
was
pushed
into
March
.
Commerce
Department
officials
were
inclined
to
explain
the
April
sales
decline
as
a
reaction
from
a
surge
of
consumer
buying
in
March
.
Adjusted
sales
that
month
were
up
a
relatively
steep
2.5%
from
those
of
the
month
before
,
which
in
turn
were
slightly
higher
than
the
January
low
of
$17.8
billion
.
Greer
Garson
,
world-famous
star
of
stage
,
screen
and
television
,
will
be
honored
for
the
high
standard
in
tasteful
sophisticated
fashion
with
which
she
has
created
a
high
standard
in
her
profession
.
As
a
Neiman-Marcus
award
winner
the
titian-haired
Miss
Garson
is
a
personification
of
the
individual
look
so
important
to
fashion
this
season
.
She
will
receive
the
1961
``
Oscar
''
at
the
24th
annual
Neiman-Marcus
Exposition
,
Tuesday
and
Wednesday
in
the
Grand
Ballroom
of
the
Sheraton-Dallas
Hotel
.
The
only
woman
recipient
,
Miss
Garson
will
receive
the
award
with
Ferdinando
Sarmi
,
creator
of
chic
,
beautiful
women's
fashions
;
;
Harry
Rolnick
,
president
of
the
Byer-Rolnick
Hat
Corporation
and
designer
of
men's
hats
;
;
Sydney
Wragge
,
creator
of
sophisticated
casuals
for
women
and
Roger
Vivier
,
designer
of
Christian
Dior
shoes
Paris
,
France
,
whose
squared
toes
and
lowered
heels
have
revolutionized
the
shoe
industry
.
The
silver
and
ebony
plaques
will
be
presented
at
noon
luncheons
by
Stanley
Marcus
,
president
of
Neiman-Marcus
,
Beneficiary
of
the
proceeds
from
the
two
showings
will
be
the
Dallas
Society
for
Crippled
Children
Cerebral
Palsy
Treatment
Center
.
The
attractive
Greer
Garson
,
who
loves
beautiful
clothes
and
selects
them
as
carefully
as
she
does
her
professional
roles
,
prefers
timeless
classical
designs
.
Occasionally
she
deserts
the
simple
and
elegant
for
a
fun
piece
simply
because
``
It's
unlike
me
''
.
In
private
life
,
Miss
Garson
is
Mrs.
E.
E.
Fogelson
and
on
the
go
most
of
the
time
commuting
from
Dallas
,
where
they
maintain
an
apartment
,
to
their
California
home
in
Los
Angeles'
suburban
Bel-Air
to
their
ranch
in
Pecos
,
New
Mexico
.
Therefore
,
her
wardrobe
is
largely
mobile
,
to
be
packed
at
a
moment's
notice
and
to
shake
out
without
a
wrinkle
.
Her
creations
in
fashion
are
from
many
designers
because
she
doesn't
want
a
complete
wardrobe
from
any
one
designer
any
more
than
she
wants
``
all
of
her
pictures
by
one
painter
''
.
A
favorite
is
Norman
Norell
,
however
.
She
likes
his
classic
chemise
.
Her
favorite
cocktail
dress
is
a
Norell
,
a
black
and
white
organdy
and
silk
jersey
.
Irene
suits
rate
high
because
they
are
designed
for
her
long-bodied
silhouette
.
She
also
likes
the
femininity
and
charm
of
designs
by
Ceil
Chapman
and
Helen
Rose
.
Balenciaga
is
her
favorite
European
designer
.
``
I
bought
my
first
dress
from
him
when
I
was
still
a
struggling
young
actress
''
,
she
reminisces
.
``
I
like
his
clothes
for
their
drama
and
simplicity
and
appreciate
the
great
impact
he
has
on
fashion
''
.
Black
and
white
is
her
favorite
color
combination
along
with
lively
glowing
pinks
,
reds
,
blues
and
greens
.
Of
Scotch-Irish-Scandinavian
descent
,
Greer
Garson
was
born
in
County
Down
,
Ireland
.
Her
mother
was
a
Greer
and
her
father's
family
came
from
the
Orkney
Isles
.
Reared
in
England
,
she
studied
to
be
a
teacher
,
earned
several
scholarships
and
was
graduated
with
honors
from
the
University
of
London
.
She
took
postgraduate
work
at
the
University
of
Grenoble
in
France
and
then
returned
to
London
to
work
on
market
research
with
an
advertising
firm
.
Her
acting
began
with
the
Birmingham
Repertory
Company
and
she
soon
became
the
toast
of
the
West
End
.
Among
stage
performances
was
a
starring
role
in
``
Golden
Arrow
''
directed
by
Noel
Coward
.
It
was
during
``
Old
Music
''
at
the
St.
James
Theater
that
Hollywood's
Louis
B.
Mayer
spotted
her
.
After
signing
a
motion-picture
contract
,
she
came
to
America
and
had
``
Goodbye
,
Mr.
Chips
''
as
her
first
assignment
after
a
year's
wait
.
Other
triumphs
include
``
Random
Harvest
''
,
``
Madame
Curie
''
,
``
Pride
and
Prejudice
''
,
``
The
Forsythe
Saga
''
and
``
Mrs.
Miniver
''
(
which
won
her
the
Academy
Award
in
1943
)
.
Honors
that
have
come
to
Greer
Garson
are
countless
.
Just
this
April
she
was
nominated
for
the
seventh
time
for
an
Academy
Award
for
her
portrayal
of
Eleanor
Roosevelt
in
``
Sunrise
at
Campobello
''
.
She
gave
a
fine
portrayal
of
Auntie
Mame
on
Broadway
in
1958
and
has
appeared
in
live
television
from
``
Captain
Brassbound's
Conversion
''
to
``
Camille
''
.
She
is
in
Madame
Tussard's
Waxworks
in
London
,
a
princess
of
the
Kiowa
tribe
and
an
honorary
colonel
in
many
states
.
She
is
adept
at
skeet
shooting
,
trout
fishing
,
Afro-Cuban
and
Oriental
dancing
and
Southwestern
archaeology
.
She
now
serves
on
the
board
of
directors
of
the
Dallas
Symphony
Orchestra
and
the
Dallas
Theater
Center
and
on
the
board
of
trustees
of
the
Dallas
Museum
of
Fine
Arts
.
She
is
state
chairman
for
the
New
Mexico
Tuberculosis
and
Cancer
Associations
.
Both
Miss
Garson
and
her
oilman-rancher
husband
are
active
supporters
of
Boys
Clubs
of
America
and
patrons
of
the
vivid
art
and
opera
colony
that
flourishes
in
New
Mexico
.
Back
in
college
,
today's
handsome
Gander
was
the
only
male
member
of
a
Texas
Tech
class
on
food
.
The
pretty
coeds
must
have
ogled
him
all
day
long
--
but
he
dutifully
kept
his
eye
on
the
gravy
.
Last
October
he
gave
a
public
speech
in
Washington
,
D.C.
entitled
``
Are
Women
Here
To
Stay
''
?
?
So
you
can
see
that
Gerald
G.
Ramsey
,
director
of
SMU's
food
services
,
is
not
the
ordinary
type
of
craven
,
women-trodden
chef
.
He
is
apt
to
rear
back
and
claim
his
rights
.
Ramsey
,
as
SMU's
food
wrangler
,
buys
enough
groceries
to
serve
32,000
meals
a
week
.
Tell
that
to
the
little
wife
when
she
moans
at
the
woman's
burden
!
!
He
also
dishes
up
3,000
snacks
.
And
he
operates
three
cafeterias
in
the
Student
Center
,
along
with
McElvaney
Dining
Hall
and
the
athlete's
tables
.
Ramsey
,
6-3
,
195
and
ruggedly
slim
,
says
,
``
I
can't
remember
when
I
didn't
pester
my
mother
to
teach
me
to
cook
''
.
He
was
in
charge
of
the
Hockaday
School
meals
from
1946
to
1950
,
before
he
moved
to
Aj
.
And
you'll
notice
that
in
both
places
,
there
are
acres
of
charming
young
ladies
who
with
little
effort
spice
up
any
chow
line
.
What
does
he
feed
his
SMU
football
mastodons
at
the
training
table
?
?
``
Mostly
meat
and
potatoes
--
they
have
to
have
that
go-go-go
without
getting
too
fat
''
,
says
Ramsey
.
So
he
hides
the
mayonnaise
.
And
to
keep
athletes'
stomachs
from
getting
jumpy
under
physical
duress
,
he
bans
all
highly
flavored
condiments
.
What
do
the
pretty
SMU
girls
like
on
their
plates
?
?
``
Pretty
much
hamburger
,
hotdogs
,
steak
and
,
at
night
,
maybe
pizza
''
,
says
the
handsome
food
expert
.
``
Unfortunately
,
there
is
still
little
demand
for
broccoli
and
cauliflower
''
.
Ramsey
has
stoked
up
Harry
Truman
,
Henry
Cabot
Lodge
,
the
King
of
Morocco
,
Clement
Atlee
and
other
shiny
characters
.
Once
four
Tibetan
monks
,
in
their
saffron
robes
,
filed
through
the
cafeteria
line
.
``
They
aren't
supposed
to
look
at
women
,
you
know
''
,
Ramsey
recalled
.
``
What
with
all
those
pretty
girls
around
,
they
had
a
hard
time
''
.
Chicken
Cadillac
Use
one
6-ounce
chicken
breast
for
each
guest
.
Salt
and
pepper
each
breast
.
Dip
in
melted
butter
and
roll
in
flour
.
Place
side
by
side
in
a
2-inch
deep
baking
pan
.
Bake
slowly
about
one
hour
at
250-275
F.
until
lightly
brown
.
Add
enough
warmed
cream
,
seasoned
to
taste
with
onion
juice
,
to
about
half
cover
the
chicken
breasts
.
Bake
slowly
at
least
one-half
hour
longer
.
While
this
is
baking
,
saute
mushrooms
,
fresh
or
canned
,
in
butter
.
Sprinkle
over
top
of
chicken
breasts
.
Serve
each
breast
on
a
thin
slice
of
slow-baked
ham
and
sprinkle
with
Thompson
seedless
grapes
.
(
Leave
off
the
ham
and
you
call
it
Chicken
Pontiac
,
says
Ramsey
.
)
Contemporary
furniture
that
is
neither
Danish
nor
straight-line
modern
but
has
sculptured
pattern
,
many
design
facets
,
warmth
,
dignity
and
an
effect
of
utter
comfort
and
livability
.
That
is
the
goal
of
two
new
collections
being
introduced
in
Dallas
this
month
.
Though
there
has
been
some
avant
garde
indication
that
contemporary
furniture
might
go
back
to
the
boxy
look
of
the
'20's
and
'40's
,
two
manufacturers
chose
to
take
the
approach
of
the
sophisticated
,
but
warm
look
in
contemporary
.
These
two
,
Heritage
and
Drexel
,
chose
too
not
to
produce
the
exactly
matching
design
for
every
piece
,
but
a
collection
of
correlated
designs
,
each
of
which
could
stand
alone
.
The
Heritage
collection
,
to
be
shown
by
Sanger-Harris
and
Anderson's
Studio
,
has
perhaps
more
different
types
of
woods
and
decorations
than
any
one
manufacturer
ever
assembled
together
at
one
time
.
Called
Perennian
,
to
indicate
its
lasting
,
good
today
and
tomorrow
quality
,
the
collection
truly
avoids
the
monotony
of
identical
pieces
.
Walnut
,
wormy
chestnut
,
pecan
,
three
varieties
of
burl
,
hand-woven
Philippine
cane
,
ceramic
tiles
,
marble
are
used
to
emphasize
the
feeling
of
texture
and
of
permanence
,
the
furniture
to
fit
into
rooms
with
tiled
floors
,
brick
or
paneled
walls
,
windows
that
bring
in
the
outdoors
.
It
is
a
collection
with
a
custom-design
look
,
offering
simplicity
with
warmth
,
variety
and
vitality
.
The
Drexel
collection
,
called
Composite
,
to
be
shown
by
Titche's
offers
a
realistic
approach
to
decorating
,
a
mature
modern
that
is
a
variation
of
many
designs
.
Rounded
posts
give
a
soft
,
sculptured
look
,
paneled
doors
have
decorative
burl
panels
or
cane
insets
plus
softening
arches
,
table
tops
are
inlaid
in
Macassar
ebony
or
acacia
.
A
high-legged
buffet
provides
easy-to-reach
serving
,
a
cocktail
table
has
small
snack
tables
tucked
under
each
end
,
recessed
arched
panels
decorate
a
60-inch
long
chest
.
An
interesting
approach
to
the
bedroom
is
presented
,
with
a
young
,
basic
,
functional
group
of
chests
,
dressers
and
corner
units
and
a
canted
headboard
.
The
other
bedroom
has
heavier
styling
,
door-fronted
dressers
with
acacia
panels
,
a
poster
bed
or
a
bed
with
arched
acacia
panels
and
matching
mirror
.
Colorful
,
bright
Eastman
Chromspun
fabrics
,
with
the
magenta
,
pink
and
white
tones
predominating
as
well
as
golden
shades
are
used
with
Composite
.
The
fabrics
have
Scotchgard
finish
to
resist
soil
and
wrinkles
.
Design
elements
closely
rooted
to
traditional
forms
but
wearing
a
definite
contemporary
label
keynote
Drexel's
fall
1961
group
,
Composite
.
The
spider-leg
pedestal
table
has
a
base
finished
in
an
ebony
,
to
set
off
the
lustrous
brown
of
the
walnut
top
.
See-through
design
of
the
chairs
combines
both
the
nostalgic
ladder
back
and
an
Oriental
shoji
flavor
.
To
bring
warmth
to
the
dining
area
,
golden
orange
tones
are
used
in
the
fabrics
.
Dignity
and
comfort
,
in
a
contemporary
manner
,
reflecting
the
best
aspects
of
today's
design
,
with
substance
and
maturity
,
keynote
the
Perennian
collection
from
Heritage
.
Center
panel
,
hand-screened
wood
,
actually
is
a
back
of
one
of
the
tall
bookcases
.
Mellow
bronzy-green-gold
fabrics
and
the
gleam
of
copper
and
hand-crafted
ceramic
accessories
reiterate
the
mood
as
does
the
Alexander
Smith
carpet
in
all
wool
loop
pile
.
The
Vagabonds
are
``
on
the
road
''
again
.
Members
are
on
their
way
to
Saledo
,
not
by
stage
coach
,
but
in
air-conditioned
cars
.
This
coming
weekend
they
have
reserved
the
entire
Stagecoach
Inn
and
adjoining
country
club
,
Saledo
,
for
festivities
.
Invitations
have
been
extended
to
some
Austin
dignitaries
including
Gov.
and
Mrs.
Price
Daniel
.
Stagecoach
Days
is
the
theme
for
the
weekend
on
the
Old
Chisholm
Trail
.
The
get-together
Friday
night
will
be
a
banquet
at
the
country
club
patio
and
pool
,
and
an
orchestra
will
play
for
dancing
.
Guests
will
wear
costumes
typical
of
the
Chisholm
Trail
Days
.
Ginghams
and
calico
will
be
popular
dress
for
the
women
.
The
men
will
be
in
western
attire
,
including
Stetsons
and
colored
vests
.
Decorating
the
ballroom
will
be
the
yellow
rose
of
Texas
,
in
tall
bushes
;
;
bluebonnets
and
stagecoach
silhouettes
.
There
will
be
a
large
drawing
of
a
sunbonnet
girl
with
eyes
that
flash
at
the
guests
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Phil
G.
Abell
are
chairmen
for
the
Saledo
trip
.
Committee
members
aiding
them
in
planning
the
entertainment
are
Messrs
and
Mmes
Roy
McKee
,
George
McElyee
,
Jack
Fanning
,
W.
H.
Roquemore
and
Joe
Darrow
.
The
travel
club
is
comprised
of
75
fun-loving
couples
who
have
as
their
motto
``
Go
Somewhere
,
Anywhere
,
Everywhere
''
.
Their
activities
will
be
climaxed
in
the
spring
of
1962
when
they
go
to
Europe
.
In
the
past
,
the
men
and
women
have
chartered
planes
to
Las
Vegas
and
Jamaica
,
buses
to
Mineral
Wells
and
Kerrville
and
private
railway
coaches
to
Shreveport
and
Galveston
.
Four
parties
are
given
a
year
.
Two
of
these
are
in
or
near
Dallas
and
the
others
away
from
the
vicinity
.
Serving
on
the
club's
board
are
Mmes
R.
P.
Anderson
,
president
;
;
A.
F.
Schmalzried
,
secretary
;
;
W.
H.
Roquemore
,
treasurer
,
and
the
following
chairmen
:
Mmes
McKee
,
publicity
;
;
Lawrence
B.
Jones
,
yearbook
,
and
Sam
Laughlin
,
scrapbook
.
A
cookie
with
caramel
filling
and
chocolate
frosting
won
$25,000
for
a
Minneapolis
housewife
in
the
13th
annual
Pillsbury
Bake-Off
Tuesday
.
Mrs.
Alice
H.
Reese
,
wife
of
an
engineer
and
mother
of
a
23-year-old
son
,
was
awarded
the
top
prize
at
a
luncheon
in
the
Beverly
Hilton
Hotel
.
Mrs.
Reese
entered
10
past
bake-offs
before
she
got
into
the
finals
.
Second
grand
prize
of
$5,000
went
to
Mrs.
Clara
L.
Oliver
for
her
Hawaiian
coffee
ring
,
a
rich
yeast
bread
with
coconut
filling
and
vanilla
glaze
.
Mother
of
five
Mrs.
Oliver
is
mother
of
five
children
and
wife
of
a
machinist
.
She
lives
in
Wellsville
,
Mo.
.
Mrs.
Reese
baked
her
cookies
for
only
the
third
time
in
the
Bake-off
finals
.
And
the
third
time
was
the
charm
.
She
dreamed
up
the
cookie
recipe
,
tried
it
,
liked
it
and
entered
it
in
the
contest
.
The
second
baking
was
for
photographing
when
told
she
was
a
finalist
.
The
third
time
was
on
the
floor
of
the
Beverly
Hilton
ballroom
and
for
the
critical
eyes
and
tongues
of
judges
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Joseph
R.
Bolker
will
give
a
dinner
on
Friday
at
their
home
in
Beverly
Hills
to
honor
Mrs.
Norman
Chandler
,
chairman
of
the
Music
Center
Building
Fund
Committee
,
and
Mr.
Chandler
.
Mr.
Bolker
heads
a
group
within
the
building
and
development
industry
to
raise
funds
in
support
of
this
cultural
center
for
the
performing
arts
.
A
feature
of
the
party
will
be
a
presentation
by
Welton
Becket
,
center
architect
,
of
color
slides
and
renderings
of
the
three-building
complex
.
Foliage
will
glow
at
formal
fall
party
Fall
foliage
and
flowers
will
decorate
Los
Angeles
Country
Club
for
the
annual
formal
party
Saturday
evening
.
More
than
200
are
expected
at
the
autumn
event
which
is
matched
in
the
spring
.
Among
those
with
reservations
are
Messrs.
and
Mmes.
William
A.
Thompson
,
Van
Cott
Niven
,
A.
B.
Cox
,
David
Bricker
,
Samuel
Perry
and
Robert
D.
Stetson
.
Others
are
Drs.
and
Mmes.
Alfred
Robbins
,
and
J.
Lafe
Ludwig
and
Gen.
and
Mrs.
Leroy
Watson
.
Guests
from
across
U.S.
honor
Dr.
Swim
When
Dr.
W.
A.
Swim
celebrated
his
75th
birthday
at
the
Wilshire
Country
Club
,
guests
came
by
chartered
plane
from
all
over
the
country
.
A
flight
originating
in
Florida
picked
up
guests
on
the
East
Coast
and
Midwest
and
a
plane
left
from
Seattle
taking
on
passengers
at
West
Coast
points
.
Cocktails
and
a
buffet
supper
were
served
to
more
than
100
persons
who
had
known
Dr.
Swim
when
he
practiced
in
Los
Angeles
.
He
started
practice
in
1917
,
and
served
on
the
State
Board
of
Medical
Examiners
.
Giving
up
the
violin
opened
a
whole
new
career
for
Ilona
Schmidl-Seeberg
,
a
tiny
Hungarian
who
Fritz
Kreisler
had
predicted
would
have
a
promising
career
on
the
concert
stage
.
A
heart
attack
when
she
was
barely
20
put
an
end
to
the
10-hour
daily
practicing
.
She
put
the
violin
away
and
took
out
some
linen
,
needles
and
yarn
to
while
away
the
long
,
idle
days
in
Budapest
.
Now
her
modern
tapestries
have
been
exhibited
on
two
continents
and
,
at
26
,
she
feels
she
is
on
the
threshold
of
a
whole
new
life
in
Los
Angeles
.
Her
days
as
an
art
student
at
the
University
of
Budapest
came
to
a
sudden
end
during
the
Hungarian
uprisings
in
1957
and
she
and
her
husband
Stephen
fled
to
Vienna
.
There
they
continued
their
studies
at
the
university
,
she
in
art
,
he
in
architecture
.
And
there
she
had
her
first
showing
of
tapestry
work
.
There's
a
lot
of
talk
about
the
problem
of
education
in
America
today
.
What
most
people
don't
seem
to
realize
,
if
they
aren't
tied
up
with
the
thing
as
I
am
,
is
that
90%
of
the
problem
is
transportation
.
I
never
dreamed
of
the
logistical
difficulties
involved
until
,
at
long
last
,
both
of
my
boys
got
squeezed
into
high
school
.
It
seems
like
only
last
year
that
we
watched
them
set
out
up
the
hill
hand
in
hand
on
a
rainy
day
in
their
yellow
raincoats
to
finger-paint
at
the
grammar
school
.
Getting
to
and
from
school
was
no
problem
.
They
either
walked
or
were
driven
.
Now
they
go
to
a
high
school
that
is
two
miles
away
.
One
might
think
the
problem
would
be
similar
.
They
could
walk
,
ride
on
a
bus
or
be
driven
.
It's
much
more
complex
than
that
.
Generally
,
they
go
to
school
with
a
girl
named
Gloriana
,
who
lives
down
the
block
,
and
has
a
car
.
This
is
a
way
of
getting
to
school
,
but
,
I
understand
,
it
entails
a
certain
loss
of
social
status
.
A
young
man
doesn't
like
to
be
driven
up
in
front
of
a
school
in
a
car
driven
by
a
girl
who
isn't
even
in
a
higher
class
than
he
is
,
and
is
also
a
girl
.
``
Why
don't
you
walk
to
school
then
''
?
?
I
suggested
.
``
My
father
walked
,
through
two
miles
of
snow
,
in
Illinois
''
.
``
Did
you
''
?
?
I
was
asked
.
``
No
''
,
I
said
,
``
I
didn't
happen
to
grow
up
in
Illinois
''
.
I
explained
,
however
,
that
I
had
my
share
of
hardship
in
making
my
daily
pilgrimage
to
the
feet
of
wisdom
.
I
had
to
ride
a
streetcar
two
miles
.
Sometimes
the
streetcar
was
late
.
Sometimes
there
weren't
even
any
seats
.
I
had
to
stand
up
,
with
the
ladies
.
Sometimes
I
got
on
the
wrong
car
and
didn't
get
to
school
at
all
,
but
wound
up
at
the
ocean
,
or
some
other
dismal
place
,
and
had
to
spend
the
day
there
.
I've
tried
to
compromise
by
letting
them
take
the
little
car
now
and
then
.
When
they
do
that
my
wife
has
to
drive
me
to
work
in
the
big
car
.
She
has
to
have
at
least
one
car
herself
.
I
feel
a
certain
loss
of
status
when
I
am
driven
up
in
front
of
work
in
a
car
driven
by
my
wife
,
who
is
only
a
woman
.
Even
that
isn't
satisfactory
.
If
they
have
to
take
any
car
,
they'd
rather
take
the
big
one
.
They
say
that
when
they
take
a
car
,
Gloriana
doesn't
take
her
car
,
but
rides
with
them
.
But
when
Gloriana
rides
with
them
they
also
have
to
take
the
two
girls
who
usually
ride
with
her
,
so
the
little
car
isn't
big
enough
.
The
logic
of
that
is
impeccable
,
of
course
,
except
that
I
feel
like
a
fool
being
driven
up
to
work
in
a
little
car
,
by
my
wife
,
when
everybody
knows
I
have
a
big
car
and
am
capable
of
driving
myself
.
The
solution
,
naturally
,
is
the
bus
.
However
,
it's
a
half-mile
walk
down
a
steep
hill
from
our
house
to
the
bus
,
and
it's
too
hard
on
my
legs
.
My
wife
could
drive
us
down
the
hill
and
we
could
all
walk
from
there
.
But
that's
hardly
realistic
.
Nobody
walks
anymore
but
crackpots
and
Harry
Truman
,
and
he's
already
got
an
education
.
Advance
publicity
on
the
Los
Angeles
Blue
Book
does
not
mention
names
dropped
as
did
the
notices
for
the
New
York
Social
Register
which
made
news
last
week
.
Published
annually
by
William
Hord
Richardson
,
the
1962
edition
,
subtitled
Society
Register
of
Southern
California
,
is
scheduled
to
arrive
with
Monday
morning's
postman
.
Publisher
Richardson
has
updated
the
Blue
Book
``
but
it
still
remains
the
compact
reference
book
used
by
so
many
for
those
ever-changing
telephone
numbers
,
addresses
,
other
residences
,
club
affiliations
and
marriages
''
.
Stars
for
marriage
Stars
throughout
the
volume
denote
dates
of
marriages
during
the
past
year
.
Last
two
to
be
added
before
the
book
went
to
press
were
the
marriages
of
Meredith
Jane
Cooper
,
daughter
of
the
Grant
B.
Coopers
,
to
Robert
Knox
Worrell
,
and
of
Mary
Alice
Ghormley
to
Willard
Pen
Tudor
.
Others
are
Carla
Ruth
Craig
to
Dan
McFarland
Chandler
Jr.
;
;
Joanne
Curry
,
daughter
of
the
Ellsworth
Currys
,
to
James
Hartley
Gregg
,
and
Valerie
Smith
to
James
McAlister
Duque
.
Also
noted
are
the
marriages
of
Elizabeth
Browning
,
daughter
of
the
George
L.
Brownings
,
to
Austin
C.
Smith
Jr.
;
;
Cynthia
Flower
,
daughter
of
the
Ludlow
Flowers
Jr.
,
to
Todd
Huntington
,
son
of
the
David
Huntingtons
.
Pasadena
listings
Listed
as
newly
wed
in
the
Pasadena
section
of
the
new
book
are
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Samuel
Moody
Haskins
3
.
She
is
the
former
Judy
Chapman
,
daughter
of
John
S.
Chapman
of
this
city
.
The
young
couple
live
in
Pasadena
.
Another
marriage
of
note
is
that
of
Jane
McAlester
and
William
Louis
Pfau
.
Changes
in
address
are
noted
.
For
instance
,
the
Edwin
Pauleys
Jr.
,
formerly
of
Chantilly
Rd.
,
are
now
at
home
on
North
Arden
Dr.
in
Beverly
Hills
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Robert
Moulton
now
live
on
Wilshire
and
the
Franklin
Moultons
on
S.
Windsor
Blvd.
.
The
Richard
Beesemyers
,
formerly
of
Connecticut
,
have
returned
to
Southern
California
and
are
now
residing
on
South
Arden
Blvd.
.
But
the
Raoul
Esnards
have
exchanged
their
residence
in
Southern
California
for
Mexico
City
.
More
new
addresses
Judge
and
Mrs.
Julian
Hazard
are
now
at
Laguna
Beach
,
while
the
Frank
Wangemans
have
moved
from
Beverly
Hills
to
New
York
,
where
he
is
general
manager
of
the
Waldorf-Astoria
Hotel
.
And
Lawrence
Chase
,
son
of
the
Ransom
Chases
,
is
listed
at
his
new
address
in
Oxford
,
Eng.
.
Others
listed
at
new
addresses
are
the
Richard
T.
Olerichs
,
the
Joseph
Aderholds
Jr.
,
the
Henri
De
La
Chapelles
,
the
John
Berteros
and
Dr.
and
Mrs.
Egerton
Crispin
,
the
John
Armisteads
,
the
Allen
Chases
,
the
Howard
Lockies
,
the
Thomas
Lockies
,
and
Anthony
Longinotti
.
Newcomers
of
social
note
from
other
parts
of
the
country
are
the
Ray
Carbones
,
formerly
of
Panama
;
;
the
Geddes
MacGregors
,
formerly
of
Scotland
,
and
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Werner
H.
Althaus
,
formerly
of
Switzerland
.
Here's
an
idea
for
a
child's
room
that
is
easy
to
execute
and
is
completely
charming
,
using
puppets
for
lamp
bases
.
Most
children
love
the
animated
puppet
faces
and
their
flexible
bodies
,
and
they
prefer
to
see
them
as
though
the
puppets
were
in
action
,
rather
than
put
away
in
boxes
.
Displayed
as
lamps
,
the
puppets
delight
the
children
and
are
decorative
accent
.
To
create
such
a
lamp
,
order
a
wired
pedestal
from
any
lamp
shop
.
Measure
the
puppet
to
determine
the
height
of
the
light
socket
,
allowing
three
to
four
inches
above
the
puppet's
head
.
Make
sure
that
the
metal
tube
through
which
the
wire
passes
is
in
the
shape
of
an
inverted
``
L
''
,
the
foot
of
the
``
L
''
about
three
inches
long
,
so
that
the
puppet
can
hang
directly
under
the
light
.
Pulling
strings
Using
the
strings
that
manipulate
the
puppet
,
suspend
him
from
the
light
fixture
by
tying
the
strings
to
the
lamp
base
.
In
this
way
,
you
can
arrange
his
legs
and
arms
in
any
desired
position
,
with
feet
,
or
one
foot
,
barely
resting
on
the
pedestal
.
If
the
puppets
are
of
uniform
size
,
you
can
change
them
in
accord
with
your
child's
whims
.
Although
a
straight
drum
shade
would
be
adequate
and
sufficiently
neutral
that
the
puppets
could
be
changed
without
disharmony
,
it
is
far
more
fun
to
create
shades
in
the
gay
spirit
of
a
child's
playtime
.
Those
illustrated
are
reminiscent
of
a
circus
top
or
a
merry-go-round
.
The
scalloped
edge
is
particularly
appealing
.
Today's
trend
toward
furniture
designs
from
America's
past
is
teaching
home-owners
and
decorators
a
renewed
respect
for
the
shrewd
cabinetmakers
of
our
Colonial
era
.
A
generation
ago
there
were
plenty
of
people
who
appreciated
antiques
and
fine
reproductions
.
In
the
background
lurked
the
feeling
,
however
,
that
these
pieces
,
beautiful
as
they
were
,
lacked
the
utilitarian
touch
.
So
junior's
bedroom
was
usually
tricked
out
with
heavy
,
nondescript
pieces
that
supposedly
could
take
the
``
hard
knocks
''
,
while
the
fine
secretary
was
relegated
to
the
parlor
where
it
was
for
show
only
.
This
isn't
true
of
the
many
homemakers
of
the
1960's
,
according
to
decorator
consultant
,
Leland
Alden
.
Housewives
are
finding
literally
hundreds
of
ways
of
getting
the
maximum
use
out
of
traditional
designs
,
says
Mr.
Alden
and
they
are
doing
it
largely
because
Colonial
craftsmen
had
``
an
innate
sense
of
the
practical
''
.
Solid
investment
There
are
a
number
of
reasons
why
the
Eighteenth
Century
designer
had
to
develop
``
down
to
earth
''
designs
--
or
go
out
of
business
.
Hotel
Escape's
Bonanza
room
has
a
real
bonanza
in
its
new
attraction
,
the
versatile
``
Kings
4
,
Plus
Two
''
.
This
is
the
strongest
act
to
hit
the
area
in
a
long
while
--
a
well
integrated
,
fast
moving
outfit
specializing
in
skits
,
vocals
,
comedy
and
instrumentals
all
of
it
distinctly
displaying
the
pro
touch
.
Show
spotlights
the
Kings
--
George
Worth
,
Bill
Kay
,
Frank
Ciciulla
and
Gene
Wilson
,
flanked
by
Dave
Grossman
and
Ron
Stevens
.
The
Plus
Two
remain
at
a
fixed
position
with
drums
and
guitar
but
the
quartet
covers
the
stage
with
a
batch
of
instruments
ranging
from
tuba
to
tambourine
,
and
the
beat
is
solid
.
In
the
comedy
division
,
the
Kings
simply
augment
talent
and
imagination
with
a
few
props
.
Net
result
is
some
crazy-wonderful
nonsense
,
part
of
which
can
be
classed
as
pure
slapstick
.
Kings
4
,
have
rated
as
a
popular
act
in
Vegas
and
Western
nightclubs
.
If
they
can't
chalk
up
big
business
here
then
let's
stop
this
noise
about
how
hip
we
are
,
and
stick
to
our
community
singing
,
elsewhere
Andy
Bartha
and
his
trio
have
booked
into
Oceania
Lounge
.
The
Cumbancheros
,
Latin
combo
,
open
Tuesday
at
the
Four
O'Clock
Club
.
``
Flip
''
Phillips
for
a
return
engagement
at
Fireside
Steak
Ranch
Wednesday
;
;
same
date
,
Johnny
LaSalle
trio
to
the
Jolly
Roger
.
Dick
Carroll
and
his
accordion
(
which
we
now
refer
to
as
``
Freida
''
)
held
over
at
Bahia
Cabana
where
``
Sir
''
Judson
Smith
brings
in
his
calypso
capers
Oct.
13
.
Johnny
Leighton
picked
up
some
new
numbers
out
in
Texas
which
he's
springing
on
the
ringsiders
in
the
Rum
House
at
Galt
Ocean
Mile
Hotel
.
``
Skip
''
Hovarter
back
in
town
from
a
summer
in
the
Reno-Lake
Tahoe
area
where
he
ran
into
Rusty
Warren
,
Kay
Martin
,
the
Marskmen
and
Tune
Toppers
--
all
pulling
good
biz
,
he
says
.
We
like
Fike
Al
Fike
,
an
ex-schoolteacher
from
Colorado
,
is
currently
pursuing
the
three
R's
--
rhythm
,
reminiscence
and
repartee
--
in
a
return
class
session
at
the
Trade
Winds
Hotel
.
Al
has
added
some
sidemen
to
the
act
which
makes
for
a
smoother
operation
but
it's
substantially
the
same
format
heard
last
spring
.
Newcomers
are
Ernie
Kemm
on
piano
,
Wes
Robbins
,
bass
and
trumpet
,
and
Jack
Kelly
on
drums
.
It's
a
solid
show
but
,
except
for
some
interim
keyboarding
by
Ernie
,
it's
Al's
all
the
way
.
Maestro's
biggest
stock
in
trade
is
his
personality
,
and
ability
to
establish
a
warm
rapport
with
his
audience
.
He
skips
around
from
jazz
,
to
blues
to
boogie
--
accompanying
himself
on
piano
and
frequently
pulling
the
customers
in
on
the
act
.
This
is
a
bouncy
show
which
may
get
a
little
too
frantic
at
times
,
but
is
nevertheless
worth
your
appraisal
.
New
owners
Cafe
Society
opens
formally
this
afternoon
under
its
new
ownership
.
George
Kissak
is
the
bossman
;
;
Terry
Barnes
has
been
named
manager
.
Spot
retains
the
same
decor
although
crystal
chandeliers
have
been
installed
above
the
terrace
dining
area
,
and
the
kitchen
has
undergone
a
remodeling
job
.
Latter
domain
,
under
the
guidance
of
Chef
Tom
Yokel
,
will
specialize
in
steaks
,
chops
,
chicken
and
prime
beef
as
well
as
Tom's
favorite
dish
,
stuffed
shrimp
.
Bandstand
features
Hal
DeCicco
,
pianist
,
for
both
dinner
hour
and
the
late
trade
.
The
Tic-Tac-Toe
trio
is
the
club's
new
show
group
which
also
plays
for
dancing
.
Here
and
there
Herbert
Heilman
in
town
for
a
day
.
Hubie's
restaurant
activities
up
in
Lorain
,
Ohio
,
may
preclude
his
return
here
until
after
Oct.
20
,
date
set
for
reopening
the
Heilman
Restaurant
on
Sunman
Restaurant
on
Sunrise
.
Louise
Franklin
cornering
the
gift
shop
market
in
Lauderdale
.
Vivacious
redhead
debuts
another
shop
,
her
sixth
,
in
the
Governor's
Club
Hotel
this
week
.
Sunday
New
Orleans
brunches
continue
at
the
Trade
Winds
but
the
daily
French
buffets
have
been
called
off
.
Mackey
Airline's
new
Sunshine
Inn
at
Bimini
set
to
open
some
time
this
month
,
according
to
Hank
Johnson
.
Student
Prince
Lounge
on
Atlantic
Blvd.
plotting
a
month-long
``
festival
''
throughout
October
,
with
special
features
.
Don
Drinkhouse
of
Pal's
Restaurant
planning
a
reunion
with
the
Miami
Playboy
Club's
pianist
,
Julian
Gould
.
Two
were
in
the
same
band
18
years
ago
;
;
Don
,
who
played
drums
,
hasn't
seen
his
chum
since
.
Steak
House
has
such
a
run
on
beer
to
wash
down
that
Mexican
food
``
Tex
''
Burgess
had
to
call
the
draft
man
twice
in
one
day
.
(
Which
is
understandable
--
if
you've
ever
sampled
the
exotic
,
peppery
fare
.
)
faces
in
places
Pualani
and
Randy
Avon
,
Dave
Searles
,
George
(
Papa
)
Gill
,
Al
Bandish
,
Jim
Morgart
,
Bob
Neil
at
the
Mouse
Trap
.
Billy
and
Jean
Moffett
at
the
Rickshaw
.
Bea
Morley
,
Jimmy
Fazio
,
Jim
O'Hare
,
Ralph
Michaels
,
Bill
and
Evelyn
Perry
at
the
Escape
.
Murphy
honors
hear
that
Patricia
Murphy
flies
up
to
St.
John's
Newfoundland
,
next
Sunday
to
attend
the
government's
special
ceremonies
at
Memorial
University
honoring
distinguished
sons
and
daughters
of
the
island
province
.
Miss
Murphy
was
born
in
Placentia
,
Newfoundland
.
Her
invitation
from
Premier
Joseph
Smallwood
is
reported
to
be
the
only
one
extended
to
a
woman
.
Fort
Lauderdale
--
The
first
in
a
series
of
five
productions
will
be
held
in
War
Memorial
Auditorium
Thursday
,
Oct.
26
.
``
Le
Theatre
D'Art
Du
Ballet
''
,
of
Monte
Carlo
,
will
present
a
program
of
four
ballets
including
``
Francesca
Da
Rimini
''
.
Performers
include
a
company
of
46
dancers
and
a
symphony
orchestra
.
The
series
of
ballets
is
sponsored
by
the
Milenoff
Ballet
Foundation
,
Inc.
,
a
non-profit
foundation
with
headquarters
in
Coral
Gables
.
Also
set
for
appearances
at
the
auditorium
this
season
are
:
``
American
Ballet
Theatre
''
on
Jan.
27
,
``
Ximenez-Vargas
Ballet
Espagnol
''
on
Feb.
2
;
;
Jorge
Bolet
,
pianist
,
on
Feb.
23
;
;
and
``
Dancers
of
Bali
''
on
March
8
.
Hollywood
--
A
Southeast
Library
Workshop
will
be
held
here
Oct.
9
,
conducted
by
Mrs.
Gretchen
Schenk
of
Summerdale
,
Ala.
,
author
,
lecturer
and
library
leader
.
The
workshop
will
begin
at
10
a.m.
and
end
at
3
p.m.
in
the
auditorium
of
the
Library
and
Fine
Arts
Building
.
There
is
no
registration
fee
but
there
will
be
a
charge
of
$2.50
for
the
luncheon
to
be
held
in
the
library
and
fine
arts
building
.
Anyone
interested
in
attending
the
meeting
may
have
reservations
with
Mrs.
John
Whelan
at
the
Hollywood
Public
Library
.
At
the
workshop
,
Mrs.
Schenk
will
discuss
``
the
board
and
the
staff
,
librarian-board
relationships
,
personnel
policies
,
how
good
is
our
librarian
and
staff
,
how
good
am
I
as
a
library
board
member
and
how
good
is
our
library
''
.
Other
workshops
will
be
in
Tallahassee
Oct.
5
;
;
Jacksonville
,
Oct.
6
;
;
Orlando
,
Oct.
10
;
;
Plant
City
Oct.
11
.
Fort
Lauderdale
--
A
series
of
high
school
assemblies
to
acquaint
junior
and
senior
students
with
the
Junior
Achievement
program
begins
at
St.
Thomas
Aquinas
Monday
.
Subsequent
assemblies
will
be
held
at
Stranahan
High
School
Tuesday
,
at
Pompano
Beach
High
Wednesday
,
and
at
Fort
Lauderdale
high
Thursday
.
The
business
education
program
operates
with
the
cooperation
of
local
high
schools
and
business
firms
.
Is
there
anything
a
frustrated
individual
can
do
about
Communism's
growing
threat
on
our
doorstep
and
around
the
world
?
?
More
than
300
teenagers
last
Sunday
proved
there
is
and
as
many
more
are
expected
to
prove
it
again
for
Jim
Kern
and
his
wife
Lynn
from
4
to
8
p.m.
Sunday
at
First
Presbyterian
Church
.
At
that
time
the
second
half
of
the
Christian
Youth
Crusade
against
Communism
will
be
staged
.
A
young
real
estate
salesman
,
Kern
first
got
seriously
interested
in
the
problems
posed
by
Communism
when
in
the
Navy
Air
Force
.
He
was
particularly
struck
by
a
course
on
Communist
brainwashing
.
Kern
began
reading
a
lot
about
the
history
and
philosophy
of
Communism
,
but
never
felt
there
was
anything
he
,
as
an
individual
,
could
do
about
it
.
When
he
attended
the
Christian
Anti-Communist
Crusade
school
here
about
six
months
ago
,
Jim
became
convinced
that
an
individual
can
do
something
constructive
in
the
ideological
battle
and
set
out
to
do
it
.
The
best
approach
,
he
figured
,
was
to
try
to
influence
young
people
like
the
high
schoolers
he
and
his
wife
serve
as
advisors
at
First
Presbyterian
Church
.
And
he
wanted
to
be
careful
that
the
kids
not
only
learn
about
Communist
but
also
about
what
he
feels
is
the
only
antidote
--
a
Biblically
strong
Christianity
.
So
the
Christian
Youth
Crusade
against
Communisn
developed
and
more
than
300
top
teenagers
and
65
adult
advisers
from
Presbyterian
churches
of
the
area
sat
enthralled
at
the
four-hour
program
.
This
Sunday
those
attending
the
second
session
will
hear
a
lecture
by
Kern
on
the
world
situation
;
;
a
review
of
the
philosophy
of
Communist
leaders
by
Ted
Slack
,
another
real
estate
agent
who
became
interested
as
a
philosophy
major
at
the
University
of
Miami
;
;
and
talks
on
how
their
Christian
faith
can
guide
them
in
learning
about
and
fighting
Communism
during
high
school
and
college
days
,
by
Ted
Place
,
director
of
Greater
Miami
Youth
for
Christ
,
and
Jon
Braun
,
director
of
Campus
Crusade
for
Christ
.
The
second
half
of
the
film
``
Communism
on
the
Map
''
and
the
movie
``
Operation
Abolition
''
also
will
be
shown
.
Response
to
the
program
has
been
so
encouraging
,
Kern
said
,
that
a
city-wide
youth
school
at
Dade
County
Auditorium
may
be
set
up
soon
.
And
to
encourage
other
churches
to
try
their
own
programs
,
Kern
said
this
Sunday's
sessions
--
including
the
free
dinner
--
will
be
open
to
anyone
who
makes
reservations
.
The
need
for
and
the
way
to
achieve
a
Christian
home
will
be
stressed
in
special
services
marking
National
Christian
Family
Week
in
Miami
area
churches
next
week
.
Of
particular
meaning
to
the
Charles
MacWhorter
family
,
3181
SW
24th
Ter.
,
will
be
the
Family
Dedication
Service
planned
for
10:50
a.m.
Sunday
at
First
Christian
Church
.
It
will
be
the
second
time
the
assistant
manager
of
a
Coral
Gables
restaurant
and
his
wife
have
taken
part
in
the
twice-a-year
ceremonies
for
families
with
new
babies
.
The
first
one
,
two
years
ago
,
changed
the
routine
of
their
home
life
.
``
When
you
stand
up
in
public
and
take
vows
to
strive
to
set
an
example
before
your
children
and
to
teach
them
the
fundamentals
of
the
Christian
faith
,
you
strive
a
little
harder
to
uphold
those
vows
''
,
explains
the
slender
vice
president
of
the
young
couples
Sunday
school
class
.
Until
that
first
dedication
service
,
he
and
Lois
felt
their
children
were
too
young
to
take
part
in
any
religious
life
at
home
.
They
have
five
daughters
--
Coral
Lee
,
5
,
Glenda
Rae
,
4
,
Pamela
,
3
,
Karen
,
2
,
and
Shari
,
five
months
.
But
after
that
service
,
they
decided
to
try
to
let
the
girls
say
grace
at
the
table
,
have
bedtime
prayers
,
and
Bible
stories
.
To
their
surprise
,
the
children
all
were
eager
and
quite
able
to
take
part
.
Even
the
two-year-old
feels
miffed
if
the
family
has
a
prayer-time
without
her
.
Dade's
chief
probation
officer
,
Jack
Blanton
,
will
lead
a
discussion
on
``
The
Changes
in
the
American
Family
''
at
7:30
p.m.
Sunday
at
Christ
Lutheran
Church
.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
George
Treadwell
will
be
honored
at
a
Family
Week
supper
and
program
at
6
p.m.
Sunday
at
Trinity
Methodist
Church
.
He
is
the
sexton
of
the
church
.
A
family
worship
service
will
follow
the
program
at
7:45
p.m.
.
The
outstanding
family
of
Central
Nazarene
Church
will
be
picked
by
ballot
from
among
eight
families
during
the
10:45
a.m.
Sunday
service
marking
National
Family
Week
.
Every
family
of
Riviera
Presbyterian
Church
has
been
asked
to
read
the
Bible
and
pray
together
daily
during
National
Christian
Family
Week
and
to
undertake
one
project
in
which
all
members
of
the
family
participate
.
To
start
the
week
of
special
programs
at
the
church
,
the
Rev.
John
D.
Henderson
will
preach
on
``
A
Successful
Marriage
''
at
9:40
and
11
a.m.
Sunday
.
New
officers
of
the
church
will
be
ordained
and
installed
at
the
7:30
p.m.
service
.
A
father
and
son
dinner
sponsored
by
the
Men's
Club
will
be
held
at
6:15
p.m.
Monday
and
the
annual
church
picnic
at
4
p.m.
next
Saturday
.
The
week
will
end
with
the
Rev.
Mr.
Henderson
preaching
on
``
The
Marriage
Altar
''
at
7:30
p.m.
Sunday
,
May
14
.
The
resignation
of
the
Rev.
Warren
I.
Densmore
,
headmaster
of
St.
Stephen's
Episcopal
Day
School
in
Coconut
Grove
,
becomes
effective
July
15
.
Enrique
Jorda
,
conductor
and
musical
director
of
the
San
Francisco
Symphony
,
will
fulfill
two
more
guest
conducting
engagements
in
Europe
before
returning
home
to
open
the
symphony's
Golden
Anniversary
season
,
it
was
announced
.
The
guest
assignments
are
scheduled
for
November
14
and
18
,
with
the
Orchestra
Sinfonica
Siciliana
in
Palermo
and
the
Orchestra
of
Radio
Cologne
.
The
season
in
San
Francisco
will
open
with
a
special
Gala
Concert
on
November
22
.
During
his
five-month
visit
abroad
,
Jorda
recently
conducted
the
Orchestre
Philharmonique
De
Bordeau
in
France
,
and
the
Santa
Cecilia
Orchestra
in
Rome
.
In
announcing
Jorda's
return
,
the
orchestra
also
announced
that
the
sale
of
single
tickets
for
the
50th
anniversary
season
will
start
at
the
Sherman
Clay
box
office
on
Wednesday
.
Guest
performers
and
conductors
during
the
coming
season
will
include
many
renowned
artists
who
began
their
careers
playing
with
the
orchestra
,
including
violinists
Yehudi
Menuhin
,
Isaac
Stern
,
Ruggiero
Ricci
and
David
Abel
;
;
pianists
Leon
Fleisher
,
Ruth
Slenczynka
and
Stephen
Bishop
and
conductor
Earl
Bernard
Murray
.
The
Leningrad
Kirov
Ballet
,
which
opened
a
series
of
performances
Friday
night
at
the
Opera
House
,
is
,
I
think
,
the
finest
``
classical
''
ballet
company
I
have
ever
seen
,
and
the
production
of
the
Petipa-Tschaikowsky
``
Sleeping
Beauty
''
with
which
it
began
the
series
is
incomparably
the
finest
I
have
ever
had
the
pleasure
of
witnessing
.
This
work
is
no
favorite
of
mine
.
I
am
prepared
to
demonstrate
at
anytime
that
it
represents
the
spirit
of
Imperial
Russia
in
its
most
vulgar
,
infantile
,
and
reactionary
aspect
;
;
that
its
persistent
use
by
ballet
companies
of
the
Soviet
regime
indicates
that
that
old
spirit
is
just
as
stultifying
alive
today
as
it
ever
was
;
;
that
its
presentation
in
this
country
is
part
of
a
capitalist
plot
to
boobify
the
American
people
;
;
that
its
choreography
is
undistinguished
and
its
score
a
shapeless
assemblage
of
self-plagiarisms
.
All
of
this
is
true
and
all
of
it
is
totally
meaningless
in
the
face
of
the
Kirov's
utterly
captivating
presentation
.
Precise
The
reasons
for
this
enchantment
are
numerous
,
but
most
of
them
end
in
``
ova
''
,
``
eva
''
,
or
``
aya
''
.
In
other
words
,
no
merely
male
creature
can
resist
that
corps
de
ballet
.
It
seems
to
have
been
chosen
exclusively
from
the
winners
of
beauty
contests
--
Miss
Omsk
,
Miss
Pinsk
,
Miss
Stalingr
oops
,
skip
it
.
These
qualities
alone
,
however
,
would
not
account
for
their
success
,
and
it
took
me
a
while
to
discover
the
crowning
virtue
that
completes
this
company's
collective
personality
.
It
is
a
kind
of
friendliness
and
frankness
of
address
toward
the
audience
which
we
have
been
led
to
believe
was
peculiar
to
the
American
ballet
.
Oh-the-pain-of-it
,
that
convention
of
Russian
ballet
whereby
the
girls
convey
the
idea
that
they
are
all
the
daughters
of
impoverished
Grand
Dukes
driven
to
the
stage
out
of
filial
piety
,
is
totally
absent
from
the
Kirov
.
This
is
all
the
more
remarkable
because
the
Kirov
is
to
ballet
what
Senator
Goldwater
is
to
American
politics
.
But
,
obviously
,
at
least
some
things
have
changed
for
the
better
in
Russia
so
far
as
the
ballet
is
concerned
.
Irina
Kolpakova
,
the
Princess
Aurora
of
Friday's
performance
,
would
be
a
change
for
the
better
anywhere
,
at
any
time
,
no
matter
who
had
had
the
role
before
.
She
is
the
most
beautiful
thing
you
ever
laid
eyes
on
,
and
her
dancing
has
a
feminine
suavity
,
lightness
,
sparkle
,
and
refinement
which
are
simply
incomparable
.
Hit
Alla
Sizova
,
who
seems
to
have
made
a
special
hit
in
the
East
,
was
delightful
as
the
lady
Bluebird
and
her
partner
,
Yuri
Soloviev
,
was
wonderfully
virile
,
acrobatic
,
and
poetic
all
at
the
same
time
,
in
a
tradition
not
unlike
that
of
Nijinsky
.
Vladilen
Semenov
,
a
fine
``
danseur
noble
''
;
;
Konstantin
Shatilov
,
a
great
character
dancer
;
;
and
Inna
Zubkovskaya
,
an
excellent
Lilac
Fairy
,
were
other
outstanding
members
of
the
cast
,
but
every
member
of
the
cast
was
magnificent
.
The
production
,
designed
by
Simon
Virsaladze
,
was
completely
traditional
but
traditional
in
the
right
way
.
It
was
done
with
great
taste
,
was
big
and
spacious
,
sumptuous
as
the
dreams
of
any
peasant
in
its
courtly
costumes
,
but
sumptuous
in
a
muted
,
pastel-like
style
,
with
rich
,
quiet
harmonies
of
color
between
the
costumes
themselves
and
between
the
costumes
and
the
scenery
.
Evegeni
Dubovskoi
conducted
an
exceptionally
large
orchestra
,
one
containing
excellent
soloists
--
the
violin
solos
by
the
concertmaster
,
Guy
Lumia
,
were
especially
fine
--
but
one
in
which
the
core
of
traveling
players
and
the
body
of
men
added
locally
had
not
had
time
to
achieve
much
unity
.
Mail
orders
are
now
being
received
for
the
series
of
concerts
to
be
given
this
season
under
the
auspices
of
the
San
Francisco
Chamber
Music
Society
.
The
season
will
open
at
the
new
Hall
of
Flowers
in
Golden
Gate
Park
on
November
20
at
8:30
p.m.
with
a
concert
by
the
Mills
Chamber
Players
.
Sustaining
members
may
sign
up
at
$25
for
the
ten-concert
season
;
;
annual
members
may
attend
for
$16
.
Participating
members
may
attend
five
of
the
concerts
for
$9
(
not
all
ten
concerts
as
was
erroneously
announced
earlier
in
The
Chronicle
)
.
Mail
orders
for
the
season
and
orders
for
single
tickets
at
$2
,
may
be
addressed
to
the
society
,
1044
Chestnut
Street
,
San
Francisco
9
.
San
Francisco
firemen
busied
themselves
last
week
with
their
annual
voluntary
task
of
fixing
up
toys
for
distribution
to
needy
children
.
Fire
Fighters
Local
798
,
which
is
sponsoring
the
toy
program
for
the
12th
straight
year
,
issued
a
call
for
San
Franciscans
to
turn
in
discarded
toys
,
which
will
be
repaired
by
off-duty
firemen
.
Toys
will
not
be
collected
at
firehouses
this
year
.
They
will
be
accepted
at
all
branches
of
the
Bay
View
Federal
Savings
and
Loan
Association
,
at
a
collection
center
in
the
center
of
the
Stonestown
mall
,
and
at
the
Junior
Museum
,
16th
Street
and
Roosevelt
Way
.
From
the
collection
centers
,
toys
will
be
taken
to
a
warehouse
at
198
Second
street
,
where
they
will
be
repaired
and
made
ready
for
distribution
.
Any
needy
family
living
in
San
Francisco
can
obtain
toys
by
writing
to
Christmas
Toys
,
676
Howard
street
,
San
Francisco
5
,
and
listing
the
parent's
name
and
address
and
the
age
and
sex
of
each
child
in
the
family
between
the
ages
of
1
and
12
.
Requests
must
be
mailed
in
by
December
5
.
Famed
cellist
Pablo
Casals
took
his
instrument
to
the
East
Room
of
the
White
House
yesterday
and
charmed
the
staff
with
a
two-hour
rehearsal
.
He
was
getting
the
feel
of
the
room
for
a
concert
tomorrow
night
for
Puerto
Rico
Governor
Luis
Munoz
Marin
.
President
Kennedy's
invitation
to
the
Spanish-born
master
said
,
``
We
feel
your
performance
as
one
of
the
world's
greatest
artists
would
lend
distinction
to
the
entertainment
of
our
guests
''
.
For
A
good
many
seasons
I've
been
looking
at
the
naughty
stuff
on
television
,
so
the
other
night
I
thought
I
ought
to
see
how
immorality
is
doing
on
the
other
side
of
the
fence
in
movies
.
After
all
,
this
year's
movies
are
next
year's
television
shows
.
So
I
went
to
see
``
La
Dolce
Vita
''
.
It
has
been
billed
as
a
towering
monument
to
immorality
.
All
the
sins
of
ancient
Rome
are
said
to
be
collected
into
this
three-hour
film
.
If
that's
all
the
Romans
did
,
it's
a
surprise
to
me
that
Rome
fell
.
After
television
,
``
La
Dolce
Vita
''
seems
as
harmless
as
a
Gray
Line
tour
of
North
Beach
at
night
.
I
cannot
imagine
a
single
scene
that
isn't
done
in
a
far
naughtier
manner
on
TV
every
week
.
I
believe
TV
watchers
will
be
bored
.
``
La
Dolce
Vita
''
has
none
of
the
senseless
brutality
or
sadism
of
the
average
TV
Western
.
Week
in
,
week
out
,
there
is
more
sex
to
be
seen
in
``
The
Adventures
Of
Ozzie
And
Harriet
''
.
There
is
more
decadence
on
``
77
Sunset
Strip
''
.
There
are
more
obvious
nymphomaniacs
on
any
private-eye
series
.
In
another
respect
,
television
viewers
will
feel
right
at
home
because
most
of
the
actors
are
unknowns
.
With
the
exception
of
Lex
Barker
and
Anita
Ekberg
,
the
credits
are
as
unfamiliar
as
you'll
find
on
the
Robert
Herridge
Theater
.
Most
of
the
emphasis
has
been
placed
on
a
``
wild
party
''
at
a
seaside
villa
.
Producer
Fellini
should
have
looked
at
some
of
the
old
silent
films
where
they
really
had
parties
!
!
The
Dolce
Vita
get-together
boasted
a
strip
tease
(
carried
as
far
as
a
black
slip
)
;
;
a
lady
drunk
on
her
hands
and
knees
who
carries
the
hero
around
on
her
back
while
he
throws
pillow
feathers
in
her
face
;
;
a
frigid
beauty
,
and
three
silly
fairies
.
Put
them
all
together
and
they
spell
out
the
only
four-letter
word
I
can
think
of
:
dull
.
Apparently
Fellini
caught
the
crowd
when
its
parties
had
begun
to
pall
.
What
a
swinging
group
they
must
have
been
when
they
first
started
entertaining
!
!
As
A
moral
shocker
it
is
a
dud
.
But
this
doesn't
detract
from
its
merit
as
an
interesting
,
if
not
great
,
film
.
The
Chronicle's
Paine
Knickerbocker
summed
it
up
neatly
:
``
This
is
a
long
picture
and
a
controversial
one
,
but
basically
it
is
a
moral
,
enthralling
and
heartbreaking
description
of
humans
who
have
become
unlinked
from
life
as
perhaps
Rome
has
from
her
traditional
political
,
cultural
and
religious
glories
''
.
And
when
they
sell
it
to
television
in
a
couple
of
years
,
it
can
be
shown
without
editing
.
Tonight
Atlantic
Monthly
editor
Edward
Weeks
moderates
a
round
table
of
four
Russian
writers
in
a
discussion
of
Soviet
literature
.
Among
the
subjects
discussed
will
be
Russian
restrictions
on
poets
and
writers
in
the
USSR
(
Channel
9
at
9:30
)
.
Person
To
Person
ventilates
the
home
lives
of
Johnny
Mercer
and
Joan
Collins
--
both
in
Southern
California
(
Channel
5
at
10:30
)
KQED
Summer
Music
Festival
features
a
live
concert
by
the
Capello
De
Musica
(
Channel
9
at
8:30
)
.
NBC
plans
a
new
series
of
three
long
programs
exploring
America's
scientific
plans
titled
``
Threshold
''
,
to
start
in
the
fall
.
``
Science
In
Action
''
,
San
Francisco's
venerable
television
program
,
will
be
seen
in
Hong
Kong
this
fall
in
four
languages
:
Mandarin
,
Cantonese
,
Chiuchow
and
English
,
according
to
a
tip
from
Dr.
Robert
C.
Miller
.
And
you
think
you
have
language
problems
.
The
week
went
along
briskly
enough
.
I
bought
a
new
little
foreign
bomb
.
It
is
a
British
bomb
.
Very
austere
yet
racy
.
It
is
very
chic
to
drive
foreign
cars
.
With
a
foreign
car
you
must
wear
a
cap
--
it
has
a
leather
band
in
the
back
.
You
must
also
wear
a
car
coat
.
The
wardrobe
for
a
foreign
bomb
is
a
little
expensive
.
But
we
couldn't
really
get
along
without
it
.
``
Where
do
you
put
the
lighter
fluid
,
ha
,
ha
''
?
?
Asked
the
gas
station
man
.
The
present
crop
of
small
cars
is
enriching
American
humor
.
Gas
station
people
are
very
debonair
about
small
cars
.
When
I
drove
a
car
with
tail
fins
,
I
had
plenty
status
at
the
wind-and-water
oases
.
My
car
gulped
20
gallons
without
even
wiping
its
mouth
.
This
excellent
foreign
bomb
takes
only
six
.
When
I
had
my
big
job
with
the
double
headlights
and
yards
of
chrome
,
the
gas
people
were
happy
to
see
me
.
``
Tires
OK
?
?
Check
the
oil
and
water
,
sir
?
?
''
They
polished
the
windshield
.
They
had
a
loving
touch
.
The
man
stuck
the
nozzle
in
the
gas
tank
.
``
What
kind
of
car
is
it
''
?
?
He
asked
gloomily
.
``
It
is
a
British
Austin
,
the
smallest
they
make
''
.
``
Get
much
mileage
''
?
?
``
About
35
''
.
The
gas
station
man
sighed
unhappily
.
``
What
I
always
say
is
what
if
somebody
clobbers
you
in
a
little
car
like
that
?
?
Crunch
,
that's
all
she
wrote
''
.
``
I
will
die
rich
''
.
``
That
will
be
$1.80
''
,
said
the
gas
station
man
.
``
The
windshield
looks
pretty
clean
''
.
Ah
,
the
fair-weather
friends
of
yesteryear
!
!
When
I
wheeled
about
,
finned
fore
and
aft
,
I
was
the
darling
of
the
doormen
.
Dollar
bills
skidded
off
my
hands
and
they
tipped
their
caps
politely
.
With
a
small
bomb
,
I
tuck
it
between
Cadillacs
.
(
The
last
doorman
that
saw
me
do
that
should
calm
himself
.
High
blood
pressure
can
get
the
best
of
any
of
us
.
)
At
last
the
White
House
is
going
to
get
some
much-copied
furniture
by
that
master
American
craftsman
,
Duncan
Phyfe
,
whose
designs
were
snubbed
in
his
lifetime
when
the
U.
S.
Presidents
of
the
19th
Century
sent
abroad
for
their
furnishings
.
The
American
Institute
of
Decorators
has
acquired
a
rare
complete
set
of
sofas
and
chairs
which
are
to
be
placed
in
the
Executive
Mansion's
library
.
The
suite
has
been
in
the
same
family
since
the
early
1800's
.
The
gift
is
being
presented
by
``
heirs
and
descendants
of
the
Rutherford
family
of
New
Jersey
,
whose
famous
estate
,
``
Tranquility
''
,
was
located
near
the
Duncan
Phyfe
workshop
at
Andover
,
N.
J.
.
Authenticated
pieces
of
Duncan
Phyfe
furniture
are
uncommon
,
although
millions
of
American
homes
today
display
pieces
patterned
after
the
style
trends
he
set
150
years
ago
.
This
acquisition
is
a
matched
,
perfect
set
--
consisting
of
two
sofas
six
feet
long
,
plus
six
sidechairs
and
two
armchairs
.
The
AID
has
undertaken
the
redecoration
of
the
White
House
library
as
a
project
in
connection
with
the
work
being
done
by
First
Lady
Jacqueline
Kennedy's
Fine
Arts
Advisory
Committee
to
secure
antiques
for
the
presidential
home
.
It
is
the
AID's
intention
to
create
in
the
library
``
a
miniature
museum
of
Americana
''
before
completed
refurbishing
is
unveiled
early
this
fall
.
The
room
will
also
feature
another
rarity
many
antiquarians
would
consider
more
important
than
the
Duncan
Phyfe
furniture
.
The
AID
has
found
a
mantlepiece
attributed
to
Samuel
McIntyre
of
Salem
,
Mass.
,
an
architect
and
woodcarver
who
competed
for
the
designing
of
the
Capitol
here
in
1792
.
The
mantel
was
found
in
a
recently
demolished
Salem
house
and
is
being
fitted
over
the
White
House
library
fireplace
.
It
will
be
painted
to
match
the
paneling
in
the
room
.
The
AID
committee's
chairman
in
charge
of
the
redecoration
,
Mrs.
Henry
Francis
Lenygon
,
was
in
town
yesterday
to
consult
with
White
House
staff
members
on
the
project
.
Mrs.
Lenygon's
committee
associates
,
announced
formally
yesterday
by
the
AID
in
New
York
,
include
Mrs.
Allen
Lehman
McCluskey
and
Stephen
J.
Jussel
,
both
wellknown
Manhattan
decorators
.
Regional
representatives
appointed
to
serve
from
each
section
of
the
country
include
Frank
E.
Barnes
of
Boston
.
President
Kennedy
couldn't
stay
away
from
his
desk
for
the
75-minute
young
people's
concert
played
on
the
White
House
lawn
yesterday
by
the
85-piece
Transylvania
Symphony
Orchestra
from
Brevard
,
N.
C.
.
But
he
left
the
doors
to
his
office
open
so
he
could
hear
the
music
.
At
4
p.m.
the
President
left
the
White
House
to
welcome
the
young
musicians
,
students
from
the
ages
of
12
to
18
who
spend
six
weeks
at
the
Brevard
Music
Center
summer
camp
,
and
to
greet
the
325
crippled
,
cardiac
and
blind
children
from
the
District
area
who
were
special
guests
at
the
concert
.
It
was
the
first
in
the
series
of
``
Concerts
for
Young
People
by
Young
People
''
to
be
sponsored
by
First
Lady
Jacqueline
Kennedy
at
the
White
House
.
She
was
not
present
yesterday
,
however
,
to
enjoy
the
music
or
watch
the
faces
of
the
delighted
audience
.
She
is
vacationing
at
the
Kennedy
summer
home
in
Hyannis
Port
,
Mass.
,
and
in
his
welcoming
remarks
,
the
President
said
he
was
representing
her
.
As
he
approached
the
open
bandstand
,
erected
facing
the
South
entrance
to
the
Executive
Mansion
,
the
band
struck
up
the
``
Star
Spangled
Banner
''
and
followed
it
with
``
Hail
To
The
Chief
''
.
``
I
think
they
played
Hail
To
The
Chief
better
than
the
Marine
Corps
Band
,
and
we
are
grateful
to
them
''
,
President
Kennedy
remarked
after
mounting
the
bandstand
and
shaking
hands
with
conductor
James
Christian
Pfohl
.
After
paying
tribute
to
the
conductor
and
his
white-clad
youthful
students
,
President
Kennedy
said
,
``
As
an
American
I
have
the
greatest
possible
pride
in
the
work
that
is
being
done
in
dozens
of
schools
stretching
across
the
United
States
--
schools
where
devoted
teachers
are
studying
with
interested
young
men
and
women
and
opening
up
the
whole
wide
horizon
of
serious
music
''
.
He
added
``
I
think
that
sometimes
in
this
country
we
are
not
aware
as
we
should
be
of
the
extraordinary
work
that
is
being
done
in
this
field
''
.
Displaying
his
knowledge
of
music
,
the
New
England-born
President
remarked
that
``
probably
the
best
chamber
music
in
the
world
is
played
in
Vermont
,
by
young
Americans
--
and
here
in
this
school
where
they
have
produced
extraordinary
musicians
and
teachers
,
and
their
work
is
being
duplicated
all
across
the
United
States
.
``
This
is
a
great
national
cultural
asset
,
and
therefore
it
is
a
great
source
of
satisfaction
to
me
,
representing
as
I
do
today
my
wife
,
to
welcome
all
of
you
here
today
at
the
White
House
''
.
As
he
left
the
bandstand
to
return
to
his
office
,
the
slender
,
sun-tanned
Chief
Executive
paused
along
the
way
to
shake
hands
with
the
members
of
the
audience
in
wheel
chairs
forming
the
first
row
under
the
field
tent
set
up
for
the
guests
.
He
expressed
surprise
to
learn
that
pretty
,
blonde
Patricia
Holbrook
,
16
,
of
Mount
Rainier
,
had
attended
the
Joseph
P.
Kennedy
School
for
the
Handicapped
in
Boston
.
``
The
nuns
there
do
a
wonderful
work
''
,
the
President
commented
.
Patricia
now
attends
the
C.
Melvin
Sharpe
Health
School
in
the
District
.
Each
of
the
children
invited
to
the
concert
wore
a
name
tag
marked
with
a
red
,
white
and
blue
ribbon
.
They
enjoyed
lemonade
and
cookies
served
before
and
during
the
concert
by
teenage
sons
and
daughters
of
members
of
the
White
House
staff
.
Many
of
the
music-loving
members
of
the
President's
staff
gathered
around
the
tent
listening
and
watching
the
rapt
attention
given
by
the
young
seated
audience
.
And
it
turned
out
to
be
more
of
a
family
affair
than
expected
.
Henry
Hall
Wilson
,
a
student
at
the
music
camp
25
years
ago
and
now
on
the
President's
staff
as
liaison
representative
with
the
House
of
Representatives
,
turned
guest
conductor
for
a
Sousa
march
,
the
``
Stars
and
Stripes
Forever
''
.
Transylvania
Symphony
Conductor
Pfohl
said
yesterday
that
Mrs.
Kennedy's
Social
Secretary
,
Letitia
Baldrige
,
told
about
plans
for
White
House
youth
concerts
before
the
National
Symphony
Orchestra
League
in
Philadelphia
last
spring
.
He
said
he
contacted
a
friend
,
Henry
Hall
Wilson
,
on
the
President's
staff
and
asked
whether
his
orchestra
could
play
,
in
the
series
.
A
flow
of
correspondence
between
Pfohl
and
Miss
Baldrige
resulted
in
an
invitation
to
the
85-student
North
Carolina
group
to
play
the
first
concert
.
One
of
the
most
interested
``
students
''
on
the
tour
which
the
Brevard
group
took
at
the
National
Gallery
yesterday
following
their
concert
at
the
White
House
,
was
Letitia
Baldrige
,
social
secretary
to
First
Lady
Jacqueline
Kennedy
.
``
I
was
an
art
major
in
college
''
,
Miss
Baldrige
explained
.
``
I've
been
here
so
many
times
I
couldn't
count
them
''
.
She
turned
out
to
be
a
fan
,
too
,
of
Margaret
Bouton
,
the
Gallery's
associate
curator
of
education
.
Miss
Bouton
headed
up
one
of
the
four
groups
that
went
on
simultaneous
tours
after
the
Gallery
had
closed
at
5
p.m.
.
The
Brevard
group
of
85
arrived
at
the
Gallery
at
6
p.m.
,
remaining
for
about
45
minutes
.
The
Brevard
visitors
had
very
little
to
say
at
the
beginning
of
the
tour
but
warmed
up
later
.
They
decided
that
they
thought
Rembrandt's
self-portrait
made
him
look
``
sad
''
;
;
they
noticed
Roman
buildings
in
the
background
of
Raphael's
``
Alba
Madonna
''
and
``
texture
''
in
a
Monet
painting
of
Rheims
Cathedral
.
Everybody
had
heard
of
Van
Gogh
,
the
French
impressionist
.
Gallery
Director
John
Walker
greeted
the
group
,
standing
on
one
of
the
benches
in
the
downstairs
lobby
to
speak
to
them
.
He
pointed
out
to
the
young
musicians
that
the
National
Gallery
``
is
the
only
museum
in
the
country
to
have
a
full-time
music
director
,
Richard
Bales
.
I'm
sure
you've
heard
of
him
and
his
record
,
'
The
Confederacy
'
''
.
Along
with
the
gallery
aide
who
explained
the
various
paintings
and
sculptures
to
each
group
,
went
one
of
the
Gallery's
blue-uniformed
guards
.
In
45
minutes
,
the
Gallery
leaders
had
given
the
students
a
quick
rundown
on
art
from
the
Renaissance
to
the
late
19th
Century
.
A
few
of
them
said
they
``
preferred
contemporary
art
''
.
Among
the
other
artists
,
whose
paintings
were
discussed
were
Boucher
,
Courbet
,
Fra
Angelico
.
The
thing
that
impressed
one
of
the
visitors
the
most
was
the
Gallery's
rotunda
fountain
``
because
it's
on
the
second
floor
''
.
That
imposing
,
somewhat
austere
,
and
seemingly
remote
collonaded
building
with
the
sphynxes
perched
on
its
threshold
at
1733
16th
St.
nw.
took
on
bustling
life
yesterday
.
More
than
250
Scottish
Rite
Masons
and
guests
gathered
in
their
House
of
the
Temple
to
pay
tribute
to
their
most
prominent
leader
,
Albert
Pike
,
who
headed
the
Scottish
Rite
from
1859
to
1891
.
They
came
together
in
the
huge
,
high-ceilinged
Council
Chamber
to
hear
the
late
leader
eulogized
.
C.
Wheeler
Barnes
of
Denver
,
head
of
the
Scottish
Rite
in
Colorado
,
praised
Pike
as
a
historian
,
author
,
poet
,
journalist
,
lawyer
,
jurist
,
soldier
and
musician
,
who
devoted
most
of
his
mature
years
to
the
strengthening
of
the
Masonic
Order
.
The
ceremony
ended
with
the
laying
of
a
wreath
at
the
crypt
of
Pike
in
the
House
of
the
Temple
.
A
reception
and
tea
followed
.
About
1500
delegates
are
expected
to
register
today
for
the
biennial
session
of
the
Ancient
and
Accepted
Scottish
Rite
for
the
Southern
Jurisdiction
of
the
United
States
.
The
opening
session
of
the
5-day
session
will
begin
at
10
a.m.
today
.
There
will
be
a
pilgrimage
to
Mount
Vernon
at
2:30
p.m.
.
A
wreath
will
be
placed
at
the
tomb
of
George
Washington
,
one
of
this
Nation's
first
Masons
--
a
past
master
of
Washington-Alexandria
Lodge
22
in
Alexandria
.
The
marriage
of
John
and
Mary
Black
had
clearly
reached
the
breaking
point
after
eight
years
.
John
had
a
job
in
a
small
firm
where
the
work
was
dull
and
monotonous
.
He
would
come
home
in
the
evening
tired
and
discouraged
--
in
no
frame
of
mind
to
play
with
their
three
children
,
or
spend
much
time
chatting
with
his
wife
.
Hurt
by
his
lack
of
interest
and
attention
,
Mary
complained
often
that
he
didn't
help
around
the
house
,
and
that
he
didn't
really
care
about
the
family
.
She
accused
him
of
ignoring
her
.
He
in
turn
told
her
she
demanded
too
much
.
They
were
both
discouraged
,
disgusted
and
miserable
.
Mary
decided
she
had
had
enough
.
Without
any
definite
plan
in
mind
,
she
went
to
a
judge
to
see
what
could
be
done
.
The
judge
listened
quietly
as
the
young
woman
poured
out
her
frustrations
--
then
discussing
with
her
the
possibility
of
seeking
aid
from
Family
Service
before
going
to
a
lawyer
.
Family
Service
,
sharing
in
UGF
,
has
five
agencies
in
the
Washington
area
.
They
offer
to
the
people
of
this
community
case
work
service
and
counseling
on
a
wide
variety
of
family
problems
.
Because
neither
of
them
really
wanted
their
marriage
to
break
up
,
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Black
agreed
to
a
series
of
interviews
at
Family
Service
of
Northern
Virginia
,
the
agency
nearest
them
.
For
nearly
a
year
,
they
have
been
receiving
counseling
,
separately
and
together
,
in
an
effort
to
understand
and
overcome
the
antagonisms
which
had
given
rise
to
the
possibility
of
divorce
.
The
interviews
have
led
each
of
them
to
a
new
appreciation
of
the
problems
confronting
the
other
.
They
are
now
working
together
toward
solving
their
difficulties
.
John
received
a
promotion
in
his
firm
.
He
gives
credit
for
the
promotion
to
his
new
outlook
on
life
.
Mary
is
cheery
and
gay
when
her
husband
comes
home
in
the
evenings
,
and
the
children's
bed-time
is
frequently
preceeded
by
a
session
of
happy
,
family
rough-housing
.
To
outsiders
,
the
Blacks
seem
to
be
an
ordinary
,
happy
family
,
and
they
are
--
but
with
a
difference
.
They
know
the
value
of
being
just
that
--
an
ordinary
,
happy
family
.
Family
Service
has
helped
hundreds
of
families
in
this
area
.
Perhaps
to
some
their
work
does
not
seem
particularly
vital
.
But
to
the
families
it
serves
,
their
help
cannot
be
measured
.
Family
Service
could
not
open
its
doors
to
a
single
family
without
the
financial
support
of
the
United
Givers
Fund
.
Anticipated
heavy
traffic
along
the
Skyline
Drive
failed
to
materialize
yesterday
,
park
rangers
said
,
and
those
who
made
the
trip
got
a
leisurely
view
of
the
fall
colors
through
skies
swept
clear
of
haze
.
For
crucial
encounter
One
of
the
initial
questions
put
to
President
Kennedy
at
his
first
news
conference
last
January
was
about
his
attitude
toward
a
meeting
with
Premier
Khrushchev
.
Mr.
Kennedy
replied
:
``
I'm
hopeful
that
from
more
traditional
exchanges
we
can
perhaps
find
greater
common
ground
''
.
The
President
knew
that
a
confrontation
with
Mr.
Khrushchev
sooner
or
later
probably
was
inevitable
and
even
desirable
.
But
he
was
convinced
that
the
realities
of
power
--
military
,
economic
and
ideological
--
were
the
decisive
factors
in
the
struggle
with
the
Communists
and
that
these
could
not
be
talked
away
at
a
heads
of
government
meeting
.
He
wanted
to
buy
time
to
strengthen
the
U.
S.
and
its
allies
and
to
define
and
begin
to
implement
his
foreign
policy
.
Last
Friday
the
White
House
announced
:
President
Kennedy
will
meet
with
Soviet
Premier
Nikita
S.
Khrushchev
in
Vienna
June
3
and
4
.
The
announcement
came
after
a
period
of
sharp
deterioration
in
East-West
relations
.
The
heightened
tension
,
in
fact
,
had
been
a
major
factor
in
the
President's
change
of
view
about
the
urgency
of
a
meeting
with
the
Soviet
leader
.
He
was
not
going
to
Vienna
to
negotiate
--
the
simultaneous
announcements
in
Washington
and
Moscow
last
week
stressed
that
no
formal
negotiations
were
planned
.
But
Mr.
Kennedy
had
become
convinced
that
a
personal
confrontation
with
Mr.
Khrushchev
might
be
the
only
way
to
prevent
catastrophe
.
That
objective
set
the
high
stakes
and
drama
of
the
Vienna
meeting
.
Despite
efforts
by
Washington
last
week
to
play
down
the
significance
of
the
meeting
,
it
clearly
was
going
to
be
one
of
the
crucial
encounters
of
the
cold
war
.
Road
to
Vienna
The
U.
S.
and
Soviet
heads
of
Government
have
met
three
times
since
Sir
Winston
Churchill
in
1953
introduced
a
new
word
into
international
diplomacy
with
his
call
for
a
fresh
approach
to
the
problem
of
peace
``
at
the
summit
of
the
nations
''
.
The
first
time
was
in
1955
when
a
full-dress
Big
Four
summit
meeting
produced
the
``
spirit
of
Geneva
''
.
The
spirit
served
chiefly
to
lull
the
West
while
Moscow
made
inroads
into
the
Middle
East
.
In
1959
President
Eisenhower
and
Premier
Khrushchev
held
an
informal
session
in
the
U.
S.
.
That
meeting
produced
the
``
spirit
of
Camp
David
''
--
a
spirit
,
it
later
turned
out
,
that
masked
a
basic
misunderstanding
about
progress
toward
a
Berlin
settlement
.
On
the
third
occasion
--
another
Big
Four
summit
session
at
Paris
a
year
ago
--
there
was
no
problem
of
an
illusory
``
spirit
''
.
Premier
Khrushchev
wrecked
the
conference
at
its
initial
session
with
a
bitter
denunciation
of
the
U.
S.
for
the
U-2
incident
.
The
episode
tended
to
confirm
the
U.
S.
belief
that
propaganda
,
the
hope
of
one-sided
concessions
,
and
the
chance
to
split
the
Allies
,
rather
than
genuine
negotiation
,
were
the
Soviet
leader's
real
aims
in
summitry
.
Pre-inaugural
position
Thus
when
Premier
Khrushchev
intimated
even
before
inauguration
that
he
hoped
for
an
early
meeting
with
the
new
President
,
Mr.
Kennedy
was
confronted
with
a
delicate
problem
.
Shortly
before
his
nomination
he
had
set
forth
his
basic
view
about
the
problem
of
negotiations
with
the
Soviet
leader
in
these
words
:
``
As
long
as
Mr.
Khrushchev
is
convinced
that
the
balance
of
world
power
is
shifting
his
way
,
no
amount
of
either
smiles
or
toughness
,
neither
Camp
David
talks
nor
kitchen
debates
,
can
compel
him
to
enter
fruitful
negotiations
''
.
The
President
had
set
for
himself
the
task
,
which
he
believed
vital
,
of
awakening
the
U.
S.
and
its
allies
to
the
hard
and
complex
effort
necessary
to
shift
that
balance
.
He
did
not
want
the
effort
weakened
by
any
illusion
that
summit
magic
might
make
it
unnecessary
.
He
wanted
time
,
too
,
to
review
the
United
States'
global
commitments
and
to
test
both
the
policies
he
had
inherited
and
new
ones
he
was
formulating
.
Above
all
,
he
did
not
want
to
appear
to
be
running
hat
in
hand
to
Premier
Khrushchev's
doorstep
.
Attitude
flexible
At
the
same
time
the
President
took
pains
not
to
rule
out
an
eventual
meeting
with
the
Soviet
leader
.
Ideally
,
he
knew
,
it
should
be
preceded
by
concrete
progress
at
lower
levels
.
But
Mr.
Kennedy
saw
value
even
in
an
informal
meeting
,
provided
that
undue
hopes
were
not
raised
in
connection
with
it
.
It
would
give
him
an
opportunity
to
take
the
measure
of
his
chief
adversary
in
the
cold
war
,
to
try
to
probe
Mr.
Khrushchev's
intentions
and
to
make
clear
his
own
views
.
Moreover
,
an
eventual
meeting
was
desirable
if
for
no
other
reason
than
to
satisfy
world
opinion
that
the
U.
S.
was
not
inflexible
and
was
sparing
no
effort
to
ease
international
tensions
.
Both
elements
--
the
caution
about
a
meeting
,
the
willingness
eventually
to
hold
one
--
were
reflected
in
a
letter
from
the
President
which
Ambassador
Llewellyn
E.
Thompson
brought
back
to
Russia
late
in
February
.
The
letter
,
dated
Feb.
22
,
was
delivered
to
Premier
Khrushchev
in
Novosibirsk
,
Siberia
,
on
March
9
.
It
dealt
mainly
with
a
broad
range
of
East-West
issues
.
But
it
also
briefly
suggested
the
possibility
of
a
meeting
with
Mr.
Khrushchev
before
the
end
of
the
year
if
the
international
climate
were
favorable
and
schedules
permitted
.
Developments
over
the
next
two
months
,
however
,
caused
the
President
to
reconsider
the
question
of
the
timing
.
There
were
intense
discussions
in
the
inner
councils
of
the
White
House
about
the
advisability
of
an
early
meeting
,
not
because
the
international
climate
was
improving
,
but
precisely
because
it
was
deteriorating
alarmingly
.
Deadlock
on
tests
The
President
was
especially
concerned
about
the
deadlock
in
the
nuclear
test
ban
negotiations
at
Geneva
.
The
deadlock
has
been
caused
by
the
Russians'
new
demand
for
a
three-man
(
East
,
West
and
neutral
)
directorate
,
and
thus
a
veto
,
over
the
control
machinery
.
In
the
U.
S.
,
strong
pressures
have
been
building
up
for
a
resumption
of
tests
on
grounds
that
the
Russians
may
be
secretly
testing
.
Mr.
Kennedy
was
less
troubled
by
that
possibility
than
by
the
belief
that
a
Geneva
breakdown
,
or
even
continued
stalemate
,
would
mean
an
unchecked
spread
of
nuclear
weapons
to
other
countries
as
well
as
a
fatal
blow
to
any
hope
for
disarmament
.
There
was
reason
to
believe
that
Premier
Khrushchev
was
also
concerned
about
a
possible
spread
of
nuclear
weapons
,
particularly
to
Communist
China
.
The
question
arose
as
to
whether
a
frank
discussion
of
that
danger
with
the
Soviet
leader
had
not
become
urgent
.
Moreover
,
Moscow
appeared
determined
to
apply
the
tripartite
veto
principle
to
the
executive
organs
of
all
international
bodies
,
including
the
U.
N.
Secretariat
and
the
International
Control
Commission
for
Laos
.
Mr.
Kennedy
was
convinced
that
insistence
on
the
demand
would
make
international
agreements
,
or
even
negotiations
,
impossible
.
Developments
in
Cuba
and
Laos
also
suggested
the
advisability
of
an
early
summit
meeting
.
Initially
the
White
House
reaction
was
that
the
bitter
exchanges
with
Moscow
over
Cuba
and
the
conflict
in
Laos
had
dampened
prospects
for
a
meeting
.
At
the
same
time
,
there
was
increased
reason
for
a
quick
meeting
lest
the
Soviet
leader
,
as
a
result
of
those
episodes
,
come
to
a
dangerously
erroneous
conclusion
about
the
West's
ability
and
determination
to
resist
Communist
pressure
.
In
Cuba
,
the
U.
S.
had
blundered
badly
and
created
the
impression
of
impotency
against
Communist
penetration
even
on
its
own
doorstep
.
In
Laos
,
the
picture
was
almost
equally
bad
.
U.
S.
willingness
to
accept
a
neutral
Laos
may
have
led
Premier
Khrushchev
to
believe
that
other
areas
could
be
``
neutralized
''
on
Soviet
terms
.
Beyond
that
,
Allied
disagreement
about
military
intervention
in
Laos
--
despite
warnings
that
they
might
do
so
--
allowed
Moscow
to
carry
out
with
impunity
a
series
of
military
and
diplomatic
moves
that
greatly
strengthened
the
pro-Communist
forces
.
As
a
result
,
the
West
is
in
a
poor
bargaining
position
at
the
current
Geneva
negotiations
on
Laos
,
and
South
Vietnam
and
other
nations
in
Southeast
Asia
are
under
increased
pressure
.
In
the
light
of
those
events
,
there
appeared
to
be
a
real
danger
that
Premier
Khrushchev
might
overreach
himself
.
Ambassador
Thompson
reported
from
Moscow
that
the
Soviet
leader's
mood
was
cocky
and
aggressive
.
He
has
indicated
that
he
plans
new
moves
on
Berlin
before
the
year
is
out
.
The
President
and
his
advisers
felt
that
the
time
might
have
come
to
warn
Premier
Khrushchev
against
a
grave
miscalculation
in
areas
such
as
Berlin
,
Iran
or
Latin
America
from
which
there
would
be
no
turning
back
.
It
was
in
the
midst
of
such
White
House
deliberations
that
Premier
Khrushchev
on
May
4
made
new
inquiries
through
the
U.
S.
Embassy
in
Moscow
about
a
meeting
with
the
President
in
the
near
future
.
Mr.
Kennedy
told
Moscow
he
would
give
his
answer
by
May
20
after
consultation
with
the
Allies
.
The
response
from
London
,
Paris
and
Bonn
was
favorable
.
Firm
arrangements
for
the
meeting
in
Vienna
were
worked
out
in
a
final
exchange
between
Moscow
and
Washington
last
week
.
Apparently
at
the
insistence
of
the
U.
S.
,
the
simultaneous
announcements
issued
in
Washington
and
Moscow
last
Friday
emphasized
the
``
informal
''
nature
of
the
meeting
.
The
Washington
announcement
said
:
``
The
President
and
Chairman
Khrushchev
understand
that
this
meeting
is
not
for
the
purpose
of
negotiating
or
reaching
agreement
on
the
major
international
problems
that
involve
the
interest
of
many
other
countries
.
The
meeting
will
,
however
,
afford
a
timely
and
convenient
opportunity
for
the
first
personal
contact
between
them
and
a
general
exchange
of
views
on
the
major
issues
which
affect
the
relationships
between
the
two
countries
''
.
The
outlook
The
Vienna
meeting
will
bring
together
a
seasoned
,
67-year-old
veteran
of
the
cold
war
who
,
in
Mr.
Kennedy's
own
words
,
is
``
shrewd
,
tough
,
vigorous
,
well-informed
and
confident
''
,
and
a
44-year-old
President
(
his
birthday
is
May
29
)
with
a
demonstrated
capacity
for
political
battle
but
little
experience
in
international
diplomacy
.
The
announcement
last
week
of
the
forthcoming
encounter
produced
strong
reactions
in
the
U.
S.
of
both
approval
and
disapproval
.
The
approval
did
not
arise
from
an
expectation
of
far-reaching
agreements
at
Vienna
.
The
inclination
was
to
accept
the
statement
that
there
would
be
no
formal
negotiations
.
But
those
who
were
in
favor
of
the
meeting
felt
that
a
frank
exchange
between
the
two
men
and
an
opportunity
to
size
one
another
up
would
prove
salutary
.
Mr.
Khrushchev
is
known
to
rely
heavily
on
his
instincts
about
his
adversaries
and
to
be
a
shrewd
judge
of
men
.
The
feeling
was
that
he
would
sense
an
inner
core
of
toughness
and
determination
in
the
President
and
that
plain
talk
by
Mr.
Kennedy
would
give
him
pause
.
Apart
from
the
personal
equation
,
another
reason
advanced
in
favor
of
the
meeting
was
that
too
often
in
the
past
the
U.S.
appeared
to
have
been
dragged
reluctantly
to
the
summit
.
Premier
Khrushchev
has
made
propaganda
capital
out
of
that
fact
and
in
the
end
got
his
summit
meeting
anyway
.
This
time
the
initiative
came
,
in
part
at
least
,
from
Washington
.
Other
allies
consulted
There
was
also
the
fact
that
by
the
time
he
meets
Mr.
Khrushchev
,
the
President
will
have
completed
conversations
with
all
the
other
principal
Allied
leaders
.
Thus
he
will
be
in
a
position
to
disabuse
the
Soviet
leader
of
any
notions
he
may
have
about
grave
Allied
disunity
.
Finally
,
there
was
a
wide
area
of
agreement
on
the
value
of
the
President's
making
a
final
effort
in
the
summit
spotlight
for
a
nuclear
test
accord
.
There
is
no
single
issue
that
has
aroused
stronger
feelings
throughout
the
world
.
If
tests
are
to
be
resumed
,
the
argument
went
,
it
is
vital
that
the
U.
S.
make
plain
that
the
onus
belongs
to
the
Soviet
Union
.
Disapproval
of
the
meeting
was
based
largely
on
the
belief
that
the
timing
could
hardly
be
worse
.
After
Cuba
and
Laos
,
it
was
argued
,
Mr.
Khrushchev
will
interpret
the
President's
consent
to
the
meeting
as
further
evidence
of
Western
weakness
--
perhaps
even
panic
--
and
is
certain
to
try
to
exploit
the
advantage
he
now
believes
he
holds
.
Moreover
,
the
President
is
meeting
the
Soviet
leader
at
a
time
when
the
Administration
has
still
not
decided
on
the
scope
of
America's
firm
foreign
policy
commitments
.
The
question
was
raised
,
for
example
,
as
to
what
attitude
the
President
would
take
if
Mr.
Khrushchev
proposes
a
broad
neutral
belt
extending
from
Southeast
Asia
to
the
Middle
East
.
There
are
,
so
my
biologist
friends
tell
me
,
mechanisms
of
adaptation
and
defense
that
are
just
too
complete
and
too
satisfactory
.
Mollusks
are
a
case
in
point
.
The
shell
,
which
served
the
strain
so
well
at
a
relatively
early
stage
in
the
evolutionary
scheme
,
tended
to
cancel
out
the
possibility
of
future
development
.
Though
this
may
or
may
not
be
good
biology
,
it
does
aptly
illustrate
the
strength
and
the
weakness
of
American
Catholic
higher
education
.
There
can
be
no
doubt
that
the
American
Catholic
accomplishment
in
the
field
of
higher
education
is
most
impressive
:
our
European
brethren
never
cease
to
marvel
at
the
number
and
the
size
of
our
colleges
and
universities
.
The
deeper
wonder
is
how
this
miracle
was
accomplished
in
decades
,
rather
than
in
centuries
and
by
immigrant
minorities
at
that
.
By
way
of
explanation
we
ourselves
are
prone
to
imagine
that
this
achievement
stems
from
the
same
American
Catholic
zeal
and
generosity
which
brought
the
parochial
school
system
into
existence
.
There
is
,
however
,
one
curious
discrepancy
in
this
broad
and
flattering
picture
.
Viewing
the
American
Catholic
educational
achievement
in
retrospect
,
we
may
indeed
see
it
as
a
unified
whole
extending
from
grade
school
to
university
.
But
the
simple
truth
is
that
higher
education
has
never
really
been
an
official
American
Catholic
project
;
;
certainly
not
in
the
same
sense
that
the
establishment
of
a
parochial
school
system
has
been
a
matter
of
official
policy
.
Official
encouragement
is
one
thing
,
but
the
down-to-earth
test
is
the
allocation
of
diocesan
and
parochial
funds
.
American
Catholics
have
responded
generously
to
bishops'
and
pastors'
appeals
for
the
support
necessary
to
create
parochial
schools
but
they
have
not
contributed
in
a
similar
fashion
to
the
establishment
of
institutions
of
higher
learning
.
They
have
not
done
so
for
the
simple
reason
that
such
appeals
have
hardly
ever
been
made
.
Diocesan
authorities
generally
have
not
regarded
this
as
their
direct
responsibility
.
All
of
this
may
be
understandable
enough
:
it
is
,
however
,
in
fact
difficult
to
see
how
diocesan
authorities
could
have
acted
otherwise
.
Yet
for
better
or
for
worse
,
the
truth
of
the
matter
is
that
most
American
Catholic
colleges
do
not
owe
their
existence
to
general
Catholic
support
but
rather
to
the
initiative
,
resourcefulness
and
sacrifices
of
individual
religious
communities
.
Community
esprit
de
corps
has
been
the
protective
shell
which
has
made
the
achievement
possible
.
To
understand
the
past
history
--
and
the
future
potential
--
of
American
Catholic
higher
education
,
it
is
necessary
to
appreciate
the
special
character
of
the
esprit
de
corps
of
the
religious
community
.
It
is
something
more
than
the
arithmetical
sum
of
individual
totals
of
piety
and
detachment
.
A
religious
community
with
a
vital
sense
of
mission
achieves
a
degree
of
group
orientation
and
group
identification
seldom
found
elsewhere
.
The
fact
that
the
group
orientation
and
group
identification
are
founded
on
supernatural
principles
and
nourished
by
the
well-springs
of
devotion
simply
give
them
a
deeper
and
more
satisfying
dimension
.
The
net
result
is
a
uniquely
satisfying
sense
of
comradeship
,
the
kind
of
comradeship
which
sparks
enthusiasm
and
blunts
the
cutting
edge
of
sacrifice
and
hardship
.
American
Catholic
colleges
and
universities
are
,
in
a
very
real
sense
,
the
product
of
``
private
enterprise
''
--
the
``
private
enterprise
''
of
religious
communities
.
Had
it
not
been
for
such
private
enterprise
,
diocesan
authorities
might
of
course
have
been
goaded
into
establishing
institutions
subsidized
by
diocesan
funds
and
parish
collections
and
staffed
by
religious
as
paid
employees
.
There
is
however
no
point
in
speculating
about
such
a
possibility
:
the
fact
of
the
matter
is
that
our
institutions
of
higher
learning
owe
their
existence
to
a
spirit
not
unlike
that
which
produces
the
``
family
business
''
.
This
``
family-community
''
spirit
is
the
real
explanation
of
the
marvel
of
our
achievement
.
It
is
this
spirit
which
explains
some
of
the
anomalies
of
American
Catholic
higher
education
,
in
particular
the
wasteful
duplication
apparent
in
some
areas
.
I
think
for
example
of
three
women's
colleges
with
pitifully
small
enrollments
,
clustered
within
a
few
miles
of
a
major
Catholic
university
,
which
is
also
co-educational
.
This
is
not
an
isolated
example
;
;
this
aspect
of
the
total
picture
has
been
commented
upon
often
enough
.
It
would
seem
to
represent
esprit
de
corps
run
riot
.
Apart
,
however
,
from
the
question
of
wasteful
duplication
,
there
is
another
aspect
of
the
``
family
business
''
spirit
in
American
Catholic
higher
education
which
deserves
closer
scrutiny
.
For
while
the
past
needs
of
the
Church
in
this
country
may
have
been
adequately
met
by
collegiate
institutions
,
which
in
temper
and
tone
closely
resembled
junior
colleges
and
finishing
schools
,
it
would
seem
that
today's
need
is
for
the
college
which
more
closely
resembles
the
university
in
its
``
pursuit
of
excellence
''
.
At
the
earlier
``
pre-academic
excellence
''
stage
of
Catholic
education
,
the
operation
could
be
conducted
on
an
intra-mural
community
basis
.
But
with
today's
demand
for
professional
qualifications
and
specialized
training
,
the
need
for
``
outsiders
''
becomes
more
pressing
.
The
problem
is
not
merely
that
more
``
outside
teachers
''
are
needed
but
that
a
different
brand
is
called
for
.
Commenting
on
the
earlier
stage
,
the
Notre
Dame
Chapter
of
the
American
Association
of
University
Professors
(
in
a
recent
report
on
the
question
of
faculty
participation
in
administrative
decision-making
)
noted
that
the
term
``
teacher-employee
''
(
as
opposed
to
,
e.g.
,
``
maintenance
employee
''
)
was
a
not
inapt
description
.
Today
however
,
the
``
outsider
''
is
likely
to
have
professional
qualifications
of
the
highest
order
(
otherwise
the
college
would
not
be
interested
in
hiring
him
)
and
to
be
acclimatized
to
the
democratic
processes
of
the
secular
or
state
university
.
And
while
no
one
expects
total
democracy
on
the
academic
scene
,
the
scholar
will
be
particularly
sensitive
to
a
line
between
first
and
second
class
citizenship
drawn
on
any
basis
other
than
that
of
academic
rank
or
professional
achievement
.
In
the
above
mentioned
report
of
the
Notre
Dame
Chapter
of
the
American
Association
of
University
Professors
,
the
basic
outlook
of
the
new
breed
of
lay
faculty
emerges
very
clearly
in
the
very
statement
of
the
problem
as
the
members
see
it
:
``
Even
with
the
best
of
intentions
he
(
the
President
of
the
university
)
is
loath
to
delegate
such
authority
and
responsibility
to
a
group
the
membership
of
which
,
considered
(
as
it
must
be
by
him
)
in
individual
terms
,
is
inhomogeneous
,
mortal
and
of
extremely
varying
temperament
,
interests
and
capabilities
.
It
is
natural
that
he
should
turn
for
his
major
support
to
a
select
and
dedicated
few
from
the
organization
which
actually
owns
the
university
and
whose
goals
are
,
in
their
opinion
,
identified
with
its
highest
good
and
(
to
use
that
oft-repeated
phrase
)
'
the
attainment
of
excellence
'
''
.
The
pattern
here
pictured
is
clearly
not
peculiar
to
Notre
Dame
:
it
is
simply
that
the
paradox
involved
in
this
kind
of
control
of
the
institution
by
``
the
organization
which
actually
owns
''
it
,
becomes
more
obvious
where
there
is
a
larger
and
more
distinguished
``
outside
''
faculty
.
It
is
particularly
interesting
that
those
who
framed
the
report
should
refer
to
``
the
organization
which
actually
owns
the
university
''
:
this
seems
to
show
an
awareness
of
the
fact
that
there
is
more
to
the
problem
than
the
ordinary
issue
of
clerical-lay
tension
.
But
in
any
case
,
one
does
not
have
to
read
very
closely
between
the
lines
to
realize
that
the
situation
is
not
regarded
as
a
particularly
happy
one
.
``
Outside
''
faculty
members
want
to
be
considered
partners
in
the
academic
enterprise
and
not
merely
paid
employees
of
a
family
business
.
There
are
two
reasons
why
failure
to
come
to
grips
with
this
demand
could
be
fatal
to
the
future
of
the
Catholic
university
.
In
the
first
place
there
is
the
obvious
problem
of
recruiting
high
caliber
personnel
.
Word
spreads
rapidly
in
the
tightly
knit
academic
profession
,
much
given
to
attending
meetings
and
conferences
.
Expressions
of
even
low-key
dissatisfaction
by
a
Catholic
college
faculty
member
has
the
effect
of
confirming
the
already
existing
stereotype
.
In
the
academic
world
there
is
seldom
anything
so
dramatic
as
a
strike
or
a
boycott
:
all
that
happens
is
that
the
better
qualified
teacher
declines
to
gamble
two
or
three
years
of
his
life
on
the
chance
that
conditions
at
the
Catholic
institution
will
be
as
good
as
those
elsewhere
.
To
appreciate
the
nature
of
the
gamble
,
it
should
be
realized
that
while
college
teaching
is
almost
a
public
symbol
of
security
,
that
security
does
not
come
as
quickly
or
as
automatically
as
it
does
in
an
elementary
school
system
or
in
the
Civil
Service
.
Much
has
been
made
of
the
fact
that
major
Catholic
institutions
now
guarantee
firm
tenure
.
This
is
a
significant
advance
but
its
import
should
not
be
exaggerated
.
When
a
man
invests
a
block
of
his
years
at
a
university
without
gaining
the
coveted
promotion
,
not
only
is
he
faced
with
the
problem
of
starting
over
but
there
is
also
a
certain
depreciation
in
the
market
value
of
his
services
.
A
man
does
not
make
that
kind
of
gamble
if
he
suspects
that
one
or
more
of
the
limited
number
of
tenure
positions
is
being
reserved
for
members
of
the
``
family
''
.
Just
as
it
is
possible
to
exaggerate
the
drawing
power
of
the
new
tenure
practices
,
it
is
also
possible
to
exaggerate
the
significance
of
the
now
relatively
adequate
salaries
paid
by
major
Catholic
institutions
.
Adequate
compensation
is
indispensable
.
Yet
adequate
compensation
--
and
particularly
merely
adequate
compensation
is
no
substitute
for
those
intangibles
which
cause
a
man
to
sacrifice
part
of
his
earning
potential
by
taking
up
college
teaching
in
the
first
place
.
Broadly
speaking
the
total
Catholic
atmosphere
is
such
an
intangible
but
the
larger
demand
is
for
a
sense
of
creative
participation
and
mature
responsibility
in
the
total
work
of
the
university
.
Religious
who
derive
their
own
sense
of
purpose
through
identification
with
the
religious
community
rather
than
the
academic
community
are
prone
to
underestimate
both
the
layman's
reservoir
of
idealism
and
his
need
for
this
identification
.
There
is
no
need
here
to
spell
out
the
conditions
of
creative
teaching
except
to
point
out
that
,
at
the
college
level
,
the
sense
of
community
and
of
community
responsibility
is
even
more
necessary
than
it
is
at
other
levels
.
The
college
teacher
needs
the
stimulus
of
communication
with
other
faculty
members
but
he
also
needs
to
feel
that
such
communication
,
even
informal
debates
over
the
luncheon
table
,
are
a
contribution
to
the
total
good
of
the
institution
.
But
this
in
turn
means
that
decisions
are
not
merely
imposed
from
the
top
but
that
there
be
some
actual
mechanism
of
faculty
participation
.
The
second
reason
for
being
concerned
with
the
dichotomy
between
faculty
members
who
are
part
of
the
``
in-group
''
that
owns
and
operates
the
institution
and
those
who
are
merely
paid
employees
,
is
,
therefore
,
the
baneful
effect
on
the
caliber
of
the
teaching
itself
.
This
is
a
problem
that
goes
considerably
beyond
questions
of
salary
and
tenure
.
Yet
though
it
may
seem
difficult
to
envision
any
definitive
resolution
of
the
problem
of
ownership
and
control
,
there
are
nevertheless
certain
suggestions
which
seem
to
be
in
order
.
The
first
is
a
negative
warning
:
there
is
no
point
in
the
creation
of
faculty
committees
and
advisory
boards
with
high-sounding
titles
but
no
real
authority
.
In
the
case
of
academic
personnel
the
``
feeling
''
of
participation
can
hardly
be
``
faked
''
.
Competent
teachers
are
well
versed
in
the
technique
of
leading
students
to
pre-set
conclusions
without
destroying
the
students'
illusion
that
they
are
making
their
own
decisions
.
Those
who
have
served
as
faculty
advisers
are
too
familiar
with
the
useful
but
artificial
mechanisms
of
student
government
to
be
taken
in
by
``
busy-work
''
and
ersatz
decision
making
.
In
any
case
it
is
by
no
means
clear
that
formally
structured
organs
of
participation
are
what
is
called
for
at
all
.
In
the
Notre
Dame
report
,
reference
was
made
to
the
fact
that
faculty
members
were
reduced
to
``
luncheon-table
communication
''
.
In
itself
there
is
nothing
wrong
with
this
form
of
``
participation
''
:
the
only
difficulty
on
the
Catholic
campus
is
that
those
faculty
members
who
are
in
a
position
to
implement
policy
,
i.e.
,
members
of
the
religious
community
which
owns
and
administers
the
institution
,
have
their
own
eating
arrangements
.
Sen.
John
L.
McClellan
of
Arkansas
and
Rep.
David
Martin
of
Nebraska
are
again
beating
the
drums
to
place
the
unions
under
the
anti-monopoly
laws
.
Once
more
the
fallacious
equation
is
advanced
to
argue
that
since
business
is
restricted
under
the
anti-monopoly
laws
,
there
must
be
a
corresponding
restriction
against
labor
unions
:
the
law
must
treat
everybody
equally
.
Or
,
in
the
words
of
Anatole
France
,
``
The
law
in
its
majestic
equality
must
forbid
the
rich
,
as
well
as
the
poor
,
from
begging
in
the
streets
and
sleeping
under
bridges
''
.
The
public
atmosphere
that
has
been
generated
which
makes
acceptance
of
this
law
a
possibility
stems
from
the
disrepute
into
which
the
labor
movement
has
fallen
as
a
result
of
Mr.
McClellan's
hearings
into
corruption
in
labor-management
relations
and
,
later
,
into
the
jurisdictional
squabbles
that
plagued
industrial
relations
at
the
missile
sites
.
The
Senator
was
shocked
by
stoppages
over
allegedly
trivial
disputes
that
delayed
our
missile
program
.
In
addition
,
disclosures
that
missile
workers
were
earning
sums
far
in
excess
of
what
is
paid
for
equivalent
work
elsewhere
provoked
his
indignation
on
behalf
of
the
American
taxpayer
who
was
footing
the
bill
.
It
is
now
disclosed
that
the
taxpayer
not
only
pays
for
high
wages
,
but
he
pays
the
employers'
strike
expenses
when
the
latter
undertakes
to
fight
a
strike
.
Business
Week
(
Aug.
9
,
1961
)
reports
that
the
United
Aircraft
Company
,
against
which
the
International
Association
of
Machinists
had
undertaken
a
strike
,
decided
to
keep
its
plants
operating
.
The
company
incurred
some
$10
million
of
expenses
attributable
to
four
factors
:
advertising
to
attract
new
employees
,
hiring
and
training
them
,
extra
overtime
,
and
defective
work
performed
by
the
new
workers
.
The
company
has
billed
the
United
States
Government
for
$7,500,000
of
these
expenses
under
the
Defense
Department
regulation
allowing
costs
of
a
type
generally
recognized
as
ordinary
and
necessary
for
the
conduct
of
the
contractor's
business
.
Rep.
Frank
Kowalski
of
Connecticut
has
brought
this
problem
to
the
attention
of
the
Armed
Services
Committee
.
The
committee
remains
unresponsive
.
Neither
has
Congressman
Martin
nor
Senator
McClellan
been
heard
from
on
the
matter
;
;
they
are
preoccupied
with
ending
labor
abuses
by
extending
the
anti-monopoly
laws
to
the
unions
.
The
recent
publicity
attending
the
successful
federal
prosecution
of
a
conspiracy
indictment
against
a
number
of
electrical
manufacturers
has
evoked
a
new
respect
for
the
anti-trust
laws
that
is
justified
neither
by
their
rationale
nor
by
the
results
they
have
obtained
.
The
anti-trust
laws
inform
a
business
that
it
must
compete
,
but
along
completely
undefined
lines
;
;
it
must
play
a
game
in
which
there
never
is
a
winner
.
The
fact
is
that
any
business
that
wants
to
operate
successfully
cannot
follow
the
law
.
Hypocrisy
thus
becomes
the
answer
to
a
foolish
public
policy
.
Let
us
look
at
the
heavy-electrical-goods
industry
in
which
General
Electric
,
Westinghouse
and
a
number
of
other
manufacturers
were
recently
convicted
of
engaging
in
a
conspiracy
to
rig
prices
and
allocate
the
market
.
The
industry
is
so
structured
that
price-setting
by
a
multi-product
company
will
vary
with
the
way
overhead
charges
are
allocated
--
whether
marginal
or
average
pricing
is
applied
.
The
problem
becomes
even
more
complex
where
an
enterprise
is
engaged
in
the
manufacture
of
a
wide
variety
of
other
goods
in
addition
to
the
heavy
electrical
equipment
.
Accounting
procedures
can
be
varied
to
provide
a
rationale
for
almost
any
price
.
Naturally
,
enterprises
of
the
size
of
General
Electric
are
in
a
position
to
structure
their
prices
in
such
a
way
that
the
relatively
small
competitors
can
be
forced
to
the
wall
in
a
very
short
time
.
Should
these
giants
really
flex
their
competitive
muscles
,
they
would
become
the
only
survivors
in
the
industry
.
Uncle
Sam
would
then
accuse
them
of
creating
a
monopoly
by
``
unfair
competition
''
.
But
if
they
show
self-restraint
,
they
don't
get
the
orders
.
Under
the
circumstances
,
the
only
protection
for
the
relatively
small
manufacturers
is
to
engage
in
exactly
the
kind
of
conspiracy
with
the
giants
for
which
the
latter
were
convicted
.
Engaging
in
such
a
conspiracy
was
an
act
of
mercy
by
the
giants
.
The
paradox
implicit
in
the
whole
affair
is
shown
by
the
demand
of
the
government
,
after
the
conviction
,
that
General
Electric
sign
a
wide-open
consent
decree
that
it
would
not
reduce
prices
so
low
as
to
compete
seriously
with
its
fellows
.
In
other
words
,
the
anti-trust
laws
,
designed
to
reduce
prices
to
the
consumer
on
Monday
,
Wednesday
and
Friday
,
become
a
tool
to
protect
the
marginal
manufacturer
on
Tuesday
,
Thursday
and
Saturday
.
And
which
theory
would
govern
the
enforcers
of
the
law
on
Sunday
?
?
The
question
might
be
asked
:
``
Don't
the
managements
of
the
heavy-electrical-goods
manufacturers
know
these
facts
?
?
Why
did
they
engage
in
a
flood
of
mea
culpas
,
throw
a
few
scapegoats
to
the
dogs
and
promise
to
be
good
boys
thereafter
,
expressing
their
complete
confidence
in
the
laws
''
?
?
The
past
usefulness
of
the
anti-trust
laws
to
management
was
explained
by
Thurman
Arnold
,
in
The
Folklore
of
Capitalism
,
back
in
1937
.
He
wrote
:
``
(
P.
211
)
the
anti-trust
laws
were
the
answer
of
a
society
which
unconsciously
felt
the
need
of
great
organizations
,
and
at
the
same
time
had
to
deny
them
a
place
in
the
moral
and
logical
ideology
of
the
social
structure
.
(
P.
214
)
anti-trust
laws
became
the
greatest
protection
to
uncontrolled
business
dictatorship
.
(
P.
215
)
when
corporate
abuses
were
attacked
,
it
was
done
on
the
theory
that
criminal
penalties
would
be
invoked
rather
than
control
.
In
this
manner
,
every
scheme
for
direct
control
broke
to
pieces
on
the
great
protective
rock
of
the
anti-trust
laws
.
(
Pp.
228-229
)
in
any
event
,
it
is
obvious
that
the
anti-trust
laws
did
not
prevent
the
formation
of
some
of
the
greatest
financial
empires
the
world
has
ever
known
,
held
together
by
some
of
the
most
fantastic
ideas
,
all
based
on
the
fundamental
notion
that
a
corporation
is
an
individual
who
can
trade
and
exchange
goods
without
control
by
the
government
''
.
This
escape
from
control
has
led
to
management's
evaluating
the
risk
of
occasional
irrational
prosecution
as
worth
while
.
A
plea
of
nolo
contendere
,
followed
by
a
nominal
fine
,
after
all
is
a
small
price
to
pay
for
this
untrammeled
license
.
(
The
penalties
handed
out
in
the
electrical
case
,
which
included
jail
sentences
,
were
unprecedented
in
anti-trust
prosecutions
,
perhaps
because
the
conspirators
had
displayed
unusual
ineptness
in
their
pricing
activities
.
)
If
a
substitute
mechanism
is
needed
for
the
control
of
a
fictitious
impersonal
market
,
quite
obviously
some
method
must
be
devised
for
representing
the
public
interest
.
A
secret
conspiracy
of
manufacturers
is
hardly
such
a
vehicle
.
However
,
one
can
argue
that
no
such
control
is
necessary
as
long
as
one
pretends
that
the
anti-trust
laws
are
effective
and
rational
.
Quite
clearly
the
anti-trust
laws
are
neither
effective
nor
rational
--
and
yet
the
argument
goes
that
they
should
be
extended
to
the
labor
union
.
Those
who
favor
placing
trade
unions
under
anti-trust
laws
imply
that
they
are
advocating
a
brand
new
reform
.
Before
1933
,
individuals
who
opposed
trade
unions
and
collective
bargaining
said
so
in
plain
English
.
The
acceptance
of
collective
bargaining
as
a
national
policy
in
1934
,
implicit
in
the
writing
of
Section
7A
of
the
National
Industrial
Recovery
Act
,
has
made
it
impolitic
to
oppose
collective
bargaining
in
principle
.
The
Wagner
Act
,
the
Taft-Hartley
Act
and
the
Landrum-Griffin
Act
all
endorse
the
principle
of
collective
bargaining
.
The
basic
purpose
of
an
effective
collective-bargaining
system
is
the
removal
of
wages
from
competition
.
If
a
union
cannot
perform
this
function
,
then
collective
bargaining
is
being
palmed
off
by
organizers
as
a
gigantic
fraud
.
The
tortured
reasoning
that
unions
use
to
deny
their
ambition
to
exercise
monopoly
power
over
the
supply
and
price
of
labor
is
one
of
the
things
that
create
a
legal
profession
.
The
problem
must
be
faced
squarely
.
If
laborers
are
merely
commodities
competing
against
each
other
in
a
market
place
like
so
many
bags
of
wheat
and
corn
(
unsupported
,
by
the
way
,
by
any
agricultural
subsidy
)
,
then
they
may
be
pardoned
for
reacting
with
complete
antagonism
to
a
system
that
imposes
such
status
upon
them
.
Human
labor
was
exactly
that
--
a
commodity
--
in
eighteenth-
and
nineteenth-century
America
.
As
early
as
1776
,
Adam
Smith
wrote
in
The
Wealth
Of
Nations
:
``
We
have
no
acts
of
Parliament
against
combining
to
lower
the
price
of
work
;
;
but
many
against
combining
to
raise
it
''
.
Eighteenth-century
England
,
upon
whose
customs
our
common
law
was
built
,
had
outlawed
unions
as
monopolies
and
conspiracies
.
In
1825
,
the
Boston
house
carpenters'
strike
for
a
ten-hour
day
was
denounced
by
the
organized
employers
,
who
declared
:
``
It
is
considered
that
all
combinations
by
any
classes
of
citizens
intended
to
effect
the
value
of
labor
tend
to
convert
all
its
branches
into
monopolies
''
.
There
were
no
pious
hypocrisies
then
about
being
for
collective
bargaining
,
but
against
labor
monopoly
.
The
courts
shared
the
opinion
of
the
employers
.
In
People
vs.
Fisher
,
Justice
Savage
of
the
New
York
Supreme
Court
declared
:
``
Without
any
officious
and
improper
interference
on
the
subject
,
the
price
of
labor
or
the
wages
of
mechanics
will
be
regulated
by
the
demand
for
the
manufactured
article
and
the
value
of
that
which
is
paid
for
it
;
;
but
the
right
does
not
exist
to
raise
the
wages
of
the
mechanic
by
any
forced
and
artificial
means
''
.
Compare
this
statement
of
a
nineteenth-century
judge
with
how
Congressman
Martin
,
according
to
the
Daily
Labor
Report
of
Sept.
19
,
1961
,
defends
the
necessity
of
enacting
anti-trust
legislation
in
the
field
of
labor
``
if
we
wish
to
prevent
monopolistic
fixing
of
wages
,
production
or
prices
and
if
we
wish
to
preserve
the
freedom
of
the
employer
and
his
employees
to
contract
on
wages
,
hours
and
conditions
of
employment
''
.
Senator
McClellan
is
proposing
the
application
of
anti-trust
measures
to
unions
in
transportation
.
His
bill
,
allegedly
aimed
at
Hoffa
,
would
amend
the
Sherman
,
Clayton
and
Norris-LaGuardia
acts
to
authorize
the
issuance
of
federal
injunctions
in
any
transportation
strike
and
would
make
it
illegal
for
any
union
to
act
in
concert
with
any
other
union
--
even
a
sister
local
in
the
same
international
.
Paradoxically
,
the
same
week
in
which
Senator
McClellan
was
attempting
to
extend
the
anti-trust
act
to
labor
in
transportation
,
the
Civil
Aeronautics
Board
was
assuring
the
airlines
that
if
they
met
in
concert
to
eliminate
many
costly
features
of
air
travel
,
the
action
would
not
be
deemed
a
violation
of
the
anti-trust
act
.
Indeed
,
it
is
in
the
field
of
transportation
that
Congress
has
most
frequently
granted
employers
exemption
from
the
anti-trust
laws
;
;
for
example
,
the
organization
of
steamship
conferences
to
set
freight
rates
and
the
encouragement
of
railroads
to
seek
mergers
.
At
the
very
moment
that
every
attempt
is
being
made
to
take
management
out
from
under
the
irrationality
of
anti-trust
legislation
,
a
drive
is
on
to
abolish
collective
bargaining
under
the
guise
of
extending
the
anti-monopoly
laws
to
unions
who
want
no
more
than
to
continue
to
set
wages
in
the
same
way
that
ship
operators
set
freight
rates
.
The
passage
of
the
Sherman
Act
was
aimed
at
giant
monopolies
.
It
was
most
effective
against
trade
unions
.
In
the
famous
Danbury
Hatters
case
,
a
suit
was
brought
against
the
union
by
the
Loewe
Company
for
monopolistic
practices
,
e.g.
,
trying
to
persuade
consumers
not
to
purchase
the
product
of
the
struck
manufacturer
.
The
suit
against
the
union
was
successful
and
many
workers
lost
their
homes
to
pay
off
the
judgment
.
In
1914
,
the
Clayton
Act
attempted
to
take
labor
out
from
under
the
anti-trust
legislation
by
stating
that
human
labor
was
not
to
be
considered
a
commodity
.
The
law
could
not
suspend
economics
.
Labor
remained
a
commodity
--
but
presumably
a
privileged
one
granted
immunization
from
the
anti-trust
laws
.
The
courts
,
by
interpretation
,
emasculated
the
act
.
In
1922
,
the
United
Mine
Workers
struck
the
Coronado
Coal
Company
.
The
company
sued
under
the
anti-trust
laws
,
alleging
that
the
union's
activity
interfered
with
the
movement
of
interstate
commerce
.
(
What
other
purpose
could
a
striking
union
have
but
to
interrupt
the
flow
of
commerce
from
the
struck
enterprise
?
?
)
The
court
first
ruled
that
the
strike
constituted
only
an
indirect
interference
with
commerce
.
The
nation
the
three-front
war
At
a
closed-door
session
on
Capitol
Hill
last
week
,
Secretary
of
State
Christian
Herter
made
his
final
report
to
the
Senate
Foreign
Relations
Committee
on
U.S.
affairs
abroad
.
Afterward
,
Tennessee's
Democratic
Senator
Albert
Gore
summed
it
up
for
newsmen
.
What
Herter
presented
,
said
Gore
,
was
``
not
a
very
encouraging
review
''
.
That
was
something
of
an
understatement
in
a
week
when
the
underlying
conflict
between
the
West
and
Communism
erupted
on
three
fronts
.
While
Communists
were
undermining
United
Nations
efforts
to
rescue
the
Congo
from
chaos
,
two
other
Communist
offensives
stirred
the
Eisenhower
Administration
into
emergency
conferences
and
serious
decisions
.
1
)
Cuba
.
Hours
after
a
parade
of
his
new
Soviet
tanks
and
artillery
,
Dictator
Fidel
Castro
suddenly
confronted
the
U.S.
with
a
blunt
and
drastic
demand
:
within
48
hours
,
the
U.S.
had
to
reduce
its
embassy
and
consulate
staffs
in
Cuba
to
a
total
of
eleven
persons
(
the
embassy
staff
alone
totaled
87
U.S.
citizens
,
plus
120
Cuban
employees
)
.
President
Eisenhower
held
an
8:30
a.m.
meeting
with
top
military
and
foreign-policy
advisers
,
decided
to
break
off
diplomatic
relations
immediately
.
``
There
is
a
limit
to
what
the
United
States
in
self-respect
can
endure
''
,
said
the
President
.
``
That
limit
has
now
been
reached
''
.
Through
Secretary
Herter
,
Ike
offered
President-elect
Kennedy
an
opportunity
to
associate
his
new
Administration
with
the
breakoff
decision
.
Kennedy
,
through
Secretary-designate
of
State
Dean
Rusk
,
declined
.
He
thus
kept
his
hands
free
for
any
action
after
Jan.
20
,
although
reaction
to
the
break
was
generally
favorable
in
the
U.S.
and
Latin
America
(
see
the
hemisphere
)
.
2
)
Laos
.
After
a
White
House
huddle
between
the
President
and
top
lieutenants
,
the
Defense
Department
reacted
sharply
to
a
cry
from
the
pro-Western
government
of
Laos
that
several
battalions
of
Communist
troops
had
invaded
Laos
from
North
Viet
Nam
.
``
In
view
of
the
present
situation
in
Laos
''
,
said
the
Pentagon's
announcement
,
``
we
are
taking
normal
precautionary
actions
to
increase
the
readiness
of
our
forces
in
the
Pacific
''
.
Cutting
short
a
holiday
at
Hong
Kong
,
the
aircraft
carriers
Lexington
and
Bennington
steamed
off
into
the
South
China
Sea
,
accompanied
by
a
swarm
of
destroyers
,
plus
troopships
loaded
with
marines
.
On
the
U.S.'s
island
base
of
Okinawa
,
Task
Force
116
,
made
up
of
Army
,
Navy
,
Marine
and
Air
Force
units
,
got
braced
to
move
southward
on
signal
.
But
by
week's
end
the
Laotian
cry
of
invasion
was
read
as
an
exaggeration
(
see
foreign
news
)
,
and
the
U.S.
was
agreeing
with
its
cautious
British
and
French
allies
that
a
neutralist
--
rather
than
a
pro-Western
--
government
might
be
best
for
Laos
.
French
&
Indians
.
There
was
a
moral
of
sorts
in
the
Laotian
situation
that
said
much
about
all
other
cold-war
fronts
.
Political
,
economic
and
military
experts
were
all
agreed
that
chaotic
,
mountainous
little
Laos
was
the
last
place
in
the
world
to
fight
a
war
--
and
they
were
probably
right
.
``
It
would
be
like
fighting
the
French
and
Indian
War
all
over
again
''
,
said
one
military
man
.
But
why
was
Laos
the
new
Southeast
Asian
battleground
?
?
At
Geneva
in
1954
,
to
get
the
war
in
Indo-China
settled
,
the
British
and
French
gave
in
to
Russian
and
Communist
Chinese
demands
and
agreed
to
the
setting
up
of
a
Communist
state
,
North
Viet
Nam
--
which
then
,
predictably
,
became
a
base
for
Communist
operations
against
neighboring
South
Viet
Nam
and
Laos
.
The
late
Secretary
of
State
John
Foster
Dulles
considered
the
1954
Geneva
agreement
a
specimen
of
appeasement
,
saw
that
resolution
would
be
needed
to
keep
it
from
becoming
a
calamity
for
the
West
.
He
began
the
diplomatic
discussions
that
resulted
in
the
establishment
of
Aj
.
``
The
important
thing
from
now
on
''
,
he
said
,
``
is
not
to
mourn
the
past
but
to
seize
the
future
opportunity
to
prevent
the
loss
in
northern
Viet
Nam
from
leading
to
the
extension
of
Communism
throughout
Southeast
Asia
''
.
Russian
tanks
and
artillery
parading
through
the
streets
of
Havana
,
Russian
intrigue
in
the
Congo
,
and
Russian
arms
drops
in
Laos
(
using
the
same
Ilyushin
transports
that
were
used
to
carry
Communist
agents
to
the
Congo
)
made
it
plain
once
more
that
the
cold
war
was
all
of
a
piece
in
space
and
time
.
Soviet
Premier
Khrushchev
sent
New
Year's
hopes
for
peace
to
President-elect
Kennedy
,
and
got
a
cool
acknowledgment
in
reply
.
Considering
the
state
of
the
whole
world
,
the
cold
war's
three
exposed
fronts
did
not
seem
terribly
ominous
;
;
but
,
in
Senator
Gore's
words
,
it
was
``
not
a
very
encouraging
''
situation
that
would
confront
John
F.
Kennedy
on
Inauguration
Day
.
The
Congress
turmoil
in
the
House
As
the
87th
Congress
began
its
sessions
last
week
,
liberal
Democrats
were
ready
for
a
finish
fight
to
open
the
sluice
gates
controlled
by
the
House
Rules
Committee
and
permit
the
free
flow
of
liberal
legislation
to
the
floor
.
The
liberal
pressure
bloc
(
which
coyly
masquerades
under
the
name
Democratic
Study
Group
)
had
fought
the
committee
before
,
and
had
always
lost
.
This
time
,
they
were
much
better
prepared
and
organized
,
and
the
political
climate
was
favorable
.
They
had
the
unspoken
support
of
President-elect
Kennedy
,
whose
own
legislative
program
was
menaced
by
the
Rules
Committee
bottleneck
.
And
counting
noses
,
they
seemed
to
have
the
votes
to
work
their
will
.
Deadly
deadlock
.
There
were
two
possible
methods
of
breaching
the
conservative
barriers
around
the
Rules
Committee
:
1
)
to
pack
it
with
additional
liberals
and
break
the
conservative-liberal
deadlock
,
or
2
)
to
remove
one
of
the
conservatives
--
namely
Mississippi's
14-term
William
Meyers
Colmer
(
pronounced
Calmer
)
.
Caucusing
,
the
liberals
decided
to
go
after
Colmer
,
which
actually
was
the
more
drastic
course
,
since
seniority
in
the
House
is
next
to
godliness
.
A
dour
,
gangling
man
with
a
choppy
gait
,
Colmer
looks
younger
than
his
70
years
,
has
gradually
swung
from
a
moderate
,
internationalist
position
to
that
of
a
diehard
conservative
.
He
is
generally
and
initially
suspicious
of
any
federal
project
,
unless
it
happens
to
benefit
his
Gulf
Coast
constituents
.
He
is
,
of
course
,
a
segregationist
,
but
he
says
he
has
never
made
an
``
anti-Negro
''
speech
.
For
20
years
he
has
enjoyed
his
power
on
the
Rules
Committee
.
There
his
vote
,
along
with
those
of
Chairman
Howard
Smith
,
the
courtly
Virginia
judge
,
and
the
four
Republican
members
,
could
and
often
did
produce
a
6-6
deadlock
that
blocked
far-out
,
Democratic-sponsored
welfare
legislation
(
a
tactic
often
acceptable
to
the
Rayburn-Johnson
congressional
leadership
to
avoid
embarrassing
votes
)
.
Equal
treatment
.
There
was
sufficient
pretext
to
demand
Colmer's
ouster
:
he
had
given
his
lukewarm
support
to
the
anti-Kennedy
electors
in
Mississippi
.
Reprisals
are
not
unheard
of
in
such
situations
,
but
the
recent
tendency
has
been
for
the
Congress
to
forgive
its
prodigal
sons
.
In
1949
the
Dixiecrats
escaped
unscathed
after
their
1948
rebellion
against
Harry
Truman
,
and
in
1957
,
after
Congressman
Adam
Clayton
Powell
campaigned
for
Dwight
Eisenhower
in
1956
,
his
fellow
Democrats
did
not
touch
his
committee
assignments
,
although
they
did
strip
him
temporarily
of
his
patronage
.
(
In
the
heat
of
the
anti-Colmer
drive
last
week
,
Judge
Smith
threatened
reprisal
against
Powell
.
Said
he
:
``
We
will
see
whether
whites
and
Negroes
are
treated
the
same
around
here
''
.
)
But
Speaker
Sam
Rayburn
,
after
huddling
in
Palm
Beach
with
President-elect
Kennedy
,
decided
that
this
year
something
had
to
be
done
about
the
Rules
Committee
--
and
that
he
was
the
only
man
who
could
do
anything
effective
.
In
a
tense
,
closed-door
session
with
Judge
Smith
,
Rayburn
attempted
to
work
out
a
compromise
:
to
add
three
new
members
to
the
Rules
Committee
(
two
Democrats
,
including
one
Southerner
,
and
one
Republican
)
.
Smith
flatly
rejected
the
offer
,
and
Mister
Sam
thereupon
decided
to
join
the
rebels
.
The
next
morning
he
summoned
a
group
of
top
Democrats
to
his
private
office
and
broke
the
news
:
he
would
lead
the
fight
to
oust
Colmer
,
whom
he
is
said
to
regard
as
``
an
inferior
man
''
.
News
of
Rayburn's
commitment
soon
leaked
out
.
When
Missouri's
Clarence
Cannon
got
the
word
,
he
turned
purple
.
``
Unconscionable
''
!
!
He
shouted
,
and
rushed
off
to
the
Speaker's
Room
to
object
:
``
A
dangerous
precedent
''
!
!
Cannon
,
a
powerful
,
conservative
man
,
brought
welcome
support
to
the
Smith-Colmer
forces
:
as
chairman
of
the
Appropriations
Committee
,
he
holds
over
each
member
the
dreadful
threat
of
excluding
this
or
that
congressional
district
from
federal
pork-barrel
projects
.
Sitting
quietly
on
an
equally
big
pork
barrel
was
another
Judge
Smith
ally
,
Georgia's
Carl
Vinson
,
chairman
of
the
Armed
Services
Committee
.
Threat
of
war
.
As
the
battle
raged
in
the
cloakrooms
and
caucuses
,
it
became
clear
that
Judge
Smith
could
lose
.
His
highest
count
of
supporters
numbered
72
--
and
he
needed
nearly
twice
that
number
to
control
the
260-member
Democratic
caucus
.
The
liberals
,
smelling
blood
,
were
faced
with
the
necessity
of
winning
three
big
votes
--
in
the
Democratic
Committee
on
Committees
,
in
the
full
party
caucus
,
and
on
the
floor
of
the
House
--
before
they
could
oust
Colmer
.
(
One
big
question
:
If
Colmer
was
to
be
purged
,
what
should
the
House
do
about
the
other
three
senior
Mississippians
who
supported
the
maverick
electors
?
?
)
In
all
three
arenas
,
they
seemed
certain
of
victory
--
especially
with
Sam
Rayburn
applying
his
whiplash
.
But
in
the
prospect
of
winning
the
battle
loomed
the
specter
of
losing
a
costlier
war
.
If
the
Southerners
were
sufficiently
aroused
,
they
could
very
well
cut
the
Kennedy
legislative
program
to
ribbons
from
their
vantage
point
of
committee
chairmanships
,
leaving
Sam
Rayburn
leading
a
truncated
,
unworkable
party
.
With
that
possibility
in
mind
,
Arkansas'
Wilbur
Mills
deliberately
delayed
calling
a
meeting
of
the
Committee
on
Committees
,
and
coolheaded
Democrats
sought
to
bring
Rayburn
and
Smith
together
again
to
work
out
some
sort
of
face-saving
compromise
.
``
Here
are
two
old
men
,
mad
at
each
other
and
too
proud
to
pick
up
the
phone
''
,
said
a
House
Democratic
leader
.
``
One
wants
a
little
more
power
,
and
the
other
doesn't
want
to
give
up
any
''
.
Battle
in
the
senate
The
Senate
launched
the
87th
Congress
with
its
own
version
of
an
ancient
liberal-conservative
battle
,
but
in
contrast
with
the
House's
guerrilla
war
it
seemed
as
pro
forma
as
a
Capitol
guide's
speech
.
Question
at
issue
:
How
big
a
vote
should
be
necessary
to
restrict
Senate
debate
--
and
thereby
cut
off
legislation-delaying
filibusters
?
?
A
wide-ranging
,
bipartisan
force
--
from
Minnesota's
Democratic
Hubert
Humphrey
to
Massachusetts'
Republican
Leverett
Saltonstall
--
was
drawn
up
against
a
solid
phalanx
of
Southern
Democrats
,
who
have
traditionally
used
the
filibuster
to
stop
civil
rights
bills
.
New
Mexico's
Clint
Anderson
offered
a
resolution
to
change
the
Senate's
notorious
Rule
22
to
allow
three-fifths
of
the
Senators
present
and
voting
to
cut
off
debate
,
instead
of
the
current
hard-to-get
two-thirds
.
Fair
Dealer
Humphrey
upped
the
ante
,
asked
cloture
power
for
a
mere
majority
of
Senators
.
Georgia's
Dick
Russell
objected
politely
,
and
the
battle
was
joined
.
Privately
,
the
liberals
admitted
that
the
Humphrey
amendment
had
no
chance
of
passage
.
Privately
,
they
also
admitted
that
their
hopes
for
Clint
Anderson's
three-fifths
modification
depended
on
none
other
than
Republican
Richard
Nixon
.
In
1957
Nixon
delivered
a
significant
opinion
that
a
majority
of
Senators
had
the
power
to
adopt
new
rules
at
the
beginning
of
each
new
Congress
,
and
that
any
rules
laid
down
by
previous
Congresses
were
not
binding
.
Armed
with
the
Nixon
opinion
,
the
Senate
liberals
rounded
up
their
slim
majority
and
prepared
to
choke
off
debate
on
the
filibuster
battle
this
week
.
Hopefully
,
the
perennial
battle
of
Rule
22
then
would
be
fought
to
a
settlement
once
and
for
all
.
Republicans
last
act
Since
Election
Day
,
Vice
President
Richard
Nixon
had
virtually
retired
--
by
his
own
wish
--
from
public
view
.
But
with
the
convening
of
the
new
Congress
,
he
was
the
public
man
again
,
presiding
over
the
Senate
until
John
Kennedy's
Inauguration
.
One
day
last
week
,
Nixon
faced
a
painful
constitutional
chore
that
required
him
to
officiate
at
a
joint
session
of
Congress
to
hear
the
official
tally
of
the
Electoral
College
vote
,
and
then
to
make
``
sufficient
declaration
''
of
the
election
of
the
man
who
defeated
him
in
the
tight
1960
presidential
election
.
Nixon
fulfilled
his
assignment
with
grace
,
then
went
beyond
the
required
``
sufficient
declaration
''
.
``
This
is
the
first
time
in
100
years
that
a
candidate
for
the
presidency
announced
the
result
of
an
election
in
which
he
was
defeated
''
,
he
said
.
The
Masters
golf
tournament
proved
last
Monday
what
it
can
do
to
the
strongest
men
and
the
staunchest
nerves
.
Gary
Player
,
the
small
,
trim
South
African
,
was
the
eventual
winner
,
but
in
all
his
25
years
he
never
spent
a
more
harrowing
afternoon
as
he
waited
for
the
victory
to
drop
in
his
lap
.
Arnold
Palmer
,
the
defending
champion
,
lost
his
title
on
the
72nd
hole
after
a
few
minutes
of
misfortune
that
left
even
his
fellow
pros
gaping
in
disbelief
.
``
Just
when
you
think
you
have
it
licked
,
this
golf
course
can
get
up
and
bite
you
''
,
Player
had
said
one
afternoon
midway
through
the
tournament
.
And
that
is
just
what
happened
on
the
last
few
holes
.
The
Augusta
National
Golf
Club
Course
got
up
and
bit
both
Player
and
Palmer
.
Player
was
the
first
to
feel
its
teeth
.
After
playing
a
splendid
first
nine
holes
in
34
--
two
strokes
under
par
--
on
this
fifth
and
final
day
of
the
tournament
(
Sunday's
fourth
round
had
been
washed
out
by
a
violent
rainstorm
when
it
was
only
half
completed
)
,
Player's
game
rapidly
fell
to
pieces
.
He
bogeyed
the
10th
.
After
a
journey
through
woods
and
stream
he
double-bogeyed
the
13th
.
He
bogeyed
the
15th
by
missing
a
short
putt
and
finally
scrambled
through
the
last
three
holes
without
further
mishap
for
a
2-over-par
74
and
a
72-hole
total
of
280
.
As
he
signed
his
scorecard
and
walked
off
the
course
,
Player
was
almost
in
tears
.
He
could
read
on
the
nearby
scoreboard
that
Palmer
,
by
then
playing
the
15th
hole
,
was
leading
him
by
a
stroke
.
Palmer
had
started
the
round
four
strokes
behind
Player
,
and
at
one
point
in
the
afternoon
had
trailed
by
as
many
as
six
strokes
.
Now
all
he
had
to
do
was
finish
in
even
par
to
collect
the
trophy
and
the
biggest
single
paycheck
in
golf
.
When
Palmer
hit
a
good
straight
drive
up
the
fairway
on
the
72nd
hole
,
he
seemed
to
have
the
championship
won
.
But
the
seven-iron
shot
he
used
to
approach
the
green
strayed
into
a
bunker
and
lodged
in
a
slight
depression
.
In
trying
to
hit
it
out
with
a
sand
wedge
Palmer
bounced
the
ball
over
the
green
,
past
spectators
and
down
the
slope
toward
a
TV
tower
.
Afterwards
,
Palmer
told
Charlie
Coe
,
his
last-round
partner
,
that
he
simply
played
the
hole
too
fast
.
He
did
seem
hasty
on
his
second
and
third
shots
,
but
then
there
was
an
agonizing
wait
of
several
minutes
while
Coe
graciously
putted
out
,
giving
Palmer
a
chance
to
recover
his
composure
,
which
he
had
quite
visibly
lost
.
When
the
shaken
Palmer
finally
did
hit
his
fourth
shot
,
he
overshot
the
hole
by
15
feet
.
Palmer
was
now
putting
merely
for
a
tie
,
and
Player
,
who
was
sitting
beside
his
wife
and
watching
it
all
on
television
in
Tournament
Chairman
Clifford
Roberts'
clubhouse
apartment
,
stared
in
amazement
when
Palmer
missed
the
putt
.
Palmer's
281
for
the
four
rounds
at
Augusta
was
a
comfortable
four
strokes
ahead
of
the
next
closest
pro
,
but
it
was
barely
good
enough
for
a
second-place
tie
with
Coe
.
The
lean
and
leathery
Oklahoma
amateur
,
who
has
been
playing
topnotch
tournament
golf
for
many
years
,
refused
to
let
the
Masters
jitters
overtake
him
and
closed
the
tournament
with
his
second
straight
69
.
End
at
seven
Until
late
last
Saturday
afternoon
Palmer
had
played
seven
consecutive
rounds
of
golf
at
the
Masters
--
four
last
year
and
three
this
--
without
ever
being
out
of
first
place
.
As
evening
approached
and
Palmer
finished
his
Saturday
round
with
a
disappointing
one-over-par
73
,
this
remarkable
record
was
still
intact
,
thanks
to
his
Thursday
and
Friday
rounds
of
68
and
69
.
His
three-round
total
of
210
was
three
strokes
better
than
the
next
best
score
,
a
213
by
Bill
Collins
,
the
tall
and
deliberate
Baltimorean
who
had
been
playing
very
well
all
winter
long
.
But
Palmer
knew
,
as
did
everybody
else
at
Augusta
,
that
his
streak
was
about
to
be
broken
.
Half
an
hour
after
he
finished
his
round
,
Player
holed
out
at
the
18th
green
with
a
69
and
a
three-round
total
of
206
,
four
strokes
ahead
of
Palmer
.
More
than
a
streak
had
ended
.
Long
after
the
erratic
climate
and
the
washed-out
final
round
on
Sunday
have
become
meteorological
footnotes
,
the
1961
Masters
will
be
remembered
as
the
scene
of
the
mano
a
mano
between
Arnold
Palmer
and
Gary
Player
.
Unlike
most
such
sports
rivalries
,
it
appeared
to
have
developed
almost
spontaneously
,
although
this
was
not
exactly
the
case
.
When
the
winter
tour
began
at
Los
Angeles
last
January
there
was
no
one
in
sight
to
challenge
Palmer's
towering
prestige
.
As
if
to
confirm
his
stature
,
he
quickly
won
three
of
the
first
eight
tournaments
.
Player
won
only
one
.
But
as
the
tour
reached
Pensacola
a
month
ago
,
Player
was
leading
Palmer
in
official
winnings
by
a
few
hundred
dollars
,
and
the
rest
of
the
field
was
somewhere
off
in
nowhere
.
On
the
final
round
at
Pensacola
,
the
luck
of
the
draw
paired
Palmer
and
Player
in
the
same
threesome
and
,
although
it
was
far
from
obvious
at
the
time
,
the
gallery
was
treated
to
the
first
chapter
of
what
promises
to
be
one
of
the
most
exciting
duels
in
sport
for
a
long
time
to
come
.
On
that
final
Sunday
at
Pensacola
neither
Palmer
nor
Player
was
leading
the
tournament
and
,
as
it
turned
out
,
neither
won
it
.
But
whichever
of
these
two
finished
ahead
of
the
other
would
be
the
undisputed
financial
leader
of
the
tour
.
Player
immediately
proved
he
was
not
in
the
least
awed
by
the
dramatic
proximity
of
Palmer
.
He
outplayed
Palmer
all
around
the
course
and
finished
with
a
tremendous
65
to
Palmer's
71
.
Thereafter
,
until
the
Masters
,
Player
gradually
increased
his
lead
over
Palmer
in
winnings
and
added
one
more
tournament
victory
at
Miami
.
When
they
reached
Augusta
last
week
,
together
they
had
won
five
of
the
13
tournaments
to
date
.
Instant
rivalry
On
Thursday
,
the
first
day
of
the
Masters
,
the
contest
between
Palmer
and
Player
developed
instantly
.
It
was
a
dismal
,
drizzly
day
but
a
good
one
on
which
to
score
over
the
Augusta
National
course
.
The
usually
skiddy
greens
were
moist
and
soft
,
so
the
golfers
were
able
to
strike
their
approach
shots
boldly
at
the
flag-stick
and
putt
firmly
toward
the
hole
without
too
much
worry
about
the
consequences
.
Palmer's
4-under-par
68
got
him
off
to
an
early
lead
,
which
he
shared
with
Bob
Rosburg
.
But
Player
was
only
one
stroke
back
,
with
a
69
.
Even
so
,
it
was
still
not
clear
to
many
in
the
enormous
horde
of
spectators
--
unquestionably
the
largest
golf
crowd
ever
--
that
this
tournament
was
to
be
,
essentially
,
a
match
between
Palmer
and
Player
.
A
lot
of
people
were
still
thinking
about
Jack
Nicklaus
,
the
spectacular
young
amateur
,
who
had
a
70
;
;
or
Ken
Venturi
,
who
had
a
somewhat
shaky
72
but
was
bound
to
do
better
;
;
or
Rosburg
,
whose
accurate
short
game
and
supersensitive
putter
can
overcome
so
many
of
Augusta's
treacheries
;
;
or
even
old
Byron
Nelson
,
whose
excellent
71
made
one
wonder
if
he
had
solved
the
geriatric
aspects
of
golf
.
(
On
Thursday
nobody
except
Charlie
Coe
was
thinking
of
Charlie
Coe
.
)
On
Friday
,
a
day
as
cloudless
and
lovely
as
Thursday
had
been
gray
and
ugly
,
the
plot
of
the
tournament
came
clearly
into
focus
.
Rosburg
had
started
early
in
the
day
,
and
by
the
time
Palmer
and
Player
were
on
the
course
--
separated
,
as
they
were
destined
to
be
for
the
rest
of
the
weekend
,
by
about
half
an
hour
--
they
could
see
on
the
numerous
scoreboards
spotted
around
the
course
that
Rosburg
,
who
ended
with
a
73
,
was
not
having
a
good
day
.
As
Player
began
his
second
round
in
a
twosome
with
amateur
Bill
Hyndman
,
his
share
of
the
gallery
was
not
conspicuously
large
for
a
contender
.
Player
began
with
a
birdie
on
the
first
hole
,
added
five
straight
pars
and
then
another
birdie
at
the
9th
.
On
the
back
nine
he
began
to
acquire
the
tidal
wave
of
a
gallery
that
stayed
with
him
the
rest
of
the
tournament
.
He
birdied
the
13th
,
the
15th
and
the
18th
--
five
birdies
,
one
bogey
and
12
pars
for
a
68
.
Starting
half
an
hour
behind
Player
in
company
with
British
Open
Champion
Kel
Nagle
,
Palmer
birdied
the
2nd
,
the
9th
,
the
13th
and
the
16th
--
four
birdies
,
one
bogey
and
13
pars
for
a
69
.
The
roar
of
Palmer's
gallery
as
he
sank
a
thrilling
putt
would
roll
out
across
the
parklike
landscape
of
Augusta
,
only
to
be
answered
moments
later
by
the
roar
of
Player's
gallery
for
a
similar
triumph
.
At
one
point
late
in
the
day
,
when
Palmer
was
lining
up
a
25-foot
putt
on
the
16th
,
a
thunderous
cheer
from
the
direction
of
the
18th
green
unmistakably
announced
that
Player
had
birdied
the
final
hole
.
Without
so
much
as
a
grimace
or
a
gesture
to
show
that
he
had
noticed
(
although
he
later
admitted
that
he
had
)
Palmer
proceeded
to
sink
his
25-footer
,
and
his
gallery
sent
its
explosive
vocalization
rolling
back
along
the
intervening
fairways
in
reply
.
The
boldness
of
champions
Anyone
who
now
doubted
that
a
personal
duel
was
under
way
had
only
to
watch
how
these
exceptionally
gifted
golfers
were
playing
this
most
difficult
golf
course
.
It
is
almost
axiomatic
that
golfers
who
dominate
the
game
of
golf
for
any
period
of
time
attack
their
shots
with
a
vehemence
bordering
on
violence
.
The
bad
luck
that
can
so
often
mar
a
well-played
round
of
golf
is
simply
overpowered
and
obliterated
by
the
contemptuous
boldness
of
these
champions
.
Bob
Jones
played
that
way
.
Byron
Nelson
did
,
Hogan
did
.
And
last
week
at
the
Masters
Palmer
and
Player
did
.
As
the
third
round
of
the
tournament
began
on
Saturday
and
the
duel
was
resumed
in
earnest
,
it
was
Player's
superior
aggressiveness
that
carried
him
into
the
lead
.
This
day
Palmer
had
started
first
.
As
Player
stepped
on
the
first
tee
he
knew
that
Palmer
had
birdied
the
first
two
holes
and
already
was
2
under
par
for
the
day
.
Player
immediately
proceeded
to
follow
suit
.
In
fact
,
he
went
on
to
birdie
the
6th
and
8th
as
well
,
to
go
4
under
par
for
the
first
eight
holes
.
But
Player's
real
test
came
on
the
ninth
hole
,
a
downhill
dogleg
to
the
left
measuring
420
yards
.
He
hit
a
poor
tee
shot
,
pulling
it
off
into
the
pine
woods
separating
the
9th
and
first
fairways
.
Having
hit
one
of
the
trees
,
the
ball
came
to
rest
not
more
than
160
yards
out
.
Player
then
had
the
choice
of
punching
the
ball
safely
out
of
the
woods
to
the
9th
fairway
and
settling
for
a
bogey
5
,
or
gambling
.
The
latter
involved
hitting
a
full
four-wood
out
to
the
first
fairway
and
toward
the
clubhouse
,
hoping
to
slice
it
back
to
the
deeply
bunkered
9th
green
.
``
I
was
hitting
the
ball
well
''
,
Player
said
later
,
``
and
I
felt
strong
.
When
you're
playing
like
that
you'd
better
attack
''
.
Player
attacked
with
his
four-wood
and
hit
a
shot
that
few
who
saw
it
will
ever
forget
.
It
struck
the
9th
green
on
the
fly
and
stopped
just
off
the
edge
.
From
there
he
chipped
back
and
sank
his
putt
for
a
par
4
.
Palmer
,
meanwhile
,
had
been
having
his
troubles
.
They
started
on
the
4th
hole
,
a
220-yard
par-3
.
On
this
day
the
wind
had
switched
180-degrees
from
the
northwest
to
the
southeast
,
and
nearly
every
shot
on
the
course
was
different
from
the
previous
few
days
.
At
the
4th
tee
Palmer
chose
to
hit
a
one-iron
when
a
three-wood
was
the
proper
club
,
so
he
put
the
ball
in
a
bunker
in
front
of
the
green
.
His
bogey
4
on
this
hole
and
subsequent
bogeys
at
5
and
7
along
with
a
birdie
at
8
brought
him
back
to
even
par
.
Starting
the
second
nine
,
Palmer
was
already
four
strokes
behind
Player
and
knew
it
.
When
Mickey
Charles
Mantle
,
the
New
York
Yankees'
man
of
muscle
,
drives
a
home
run
450
feet
into
the
bleachers
,
his
feat
touches
upon
the
sublime
.
When
Roger
Eugene
Maris
,
Mantle's
muscular
teammate
,
powers
four
home
runs
in
a
double-header
,
his
performance
merits
awe
.
But
when
tiny
,
145-pound
Albert
Gregory
Pearson
of
the
Los
Angeles
Angels
,
who
once
caught
three
straight
fly
balls
in
center
field
because
,
as
a
teammate
explained
,
``
the
other
team
thought
no
one
was
out
there
''
,
hits
seven
home
runs
in
four
months
(
three
more
than
his
total
in
1958
,
1959
,
and
1960
)
,
his
achievement
borders
on
the
ridiculous
.
This
is
Baseball
1961
.
This
is
the
year
home
runs
ranged
from
the
sublime
to
the
ridiculous
.
It
is
the
year
when
(
1
)
amiable
Jim
Gentile
of
the
Baltimore
Orioles
ambled
to
the
plate
in
consecutive
innings
with
the
bases
loaded
and
,
in
unprecedented
style
,
delivered
consecutive
grand-slam
home
runs
;
;
(
2
)
Willie
Mays
of
the
San
Francisco
Giants
borrowed
a
teammate's
bat
and
became
the
ninth
big
leaguer
to
stroke
four
home
runs
in
a
game
;
;
(
3
)
the
Milwaukee
Braves
tied
a
major-league
record
with
fourteen
home
runs
in
three
games
and
lost
two
of
them
;
;
and
(
4
)
catcher
Johnny
Blanchard
of
the
New
York
Yankees
matched
a
record
with
home
runs
in
four
successive
times
at
bat
,
two
of
them
as
a
pinch-hitter
.
Pitchers
grumble
about
lively
balls
and
lively
bats
,
the
shrinking
strike
zone
,
and
the
fact
that
the
knock-down
pitch
is
now
illegal
.
Experts
point
to
the
thinning
of
pitching
talent
in
the
American
League
caused
by
expansion
.
Whatever
the
reasons
,
not
in
30
years
has
a
single
season
produced
such
thunderous
assaults
upon
the
bureau
of
baseball
records
,
home-run
division
.
Of
all
the
records
in
peril
,
one
stands
apart
,
dramatic
in
its
making
,
dramatic
in
its
endurance
,
and
now
,
doubly
dramatic
in
its
jeopardy
.
This
,
of
course
,
is
baseball's
most
remarkable
mark
:
The
60
home
runs
hit
in
1927
by
the
incorrigible
epicure
,
the
incredible
athlete
,
George
Herman
(
Babe
)
Ruth
of
the
Yankees
.
Since
1927
,
fewer
than
a
dozen
men
have
made
serious
runs
at
Babe
Ruth's
record
and
each
,
in
turn
,
has
been
thwarted
.
What
ultimately
frustrated
every
challenger
was
Ruth's
amazing
September
surge
.
In
the
final
month
of
the
1927
season
,
he
hit
seventeen
home
runs
,
a
closing
spurt
never
matched
.
Double
threat
:
Always
,
in
the
abortive
attacks
upon
Ruth's
record
,
one
man
alone
--
a
Jimmy
Foxx
(
58
in
1932
)
or
a
Hank
Greenberg
(
58
in
1938
)
or
a
Hack
Wilson
(
56
in
1930
)
--
made
the
bid
.
But
now
,
for
the
first
time
since
Lou
Gehrig
(
with
47
home
runs
)
spurred
Ruth
on
in
1927
,
two
men
playing
for
the
same
team
have
zeroed
in
on
60
.
Their
names
are
Mantle
and
Maris
,
their
team
is
the
Yankees
,
and
their
threat
is
real
.
After
108
games
in
1927
,
Ruth
had
35
home
runs
.
After
108
games
in
1961
,
Mickey
Mantle
has
43
,
Roger
Maris
41
.
Extend
Mantle's
and
Maris's
present
paces
over
the
full
1961
schedule
of
162
games
,
and
,
mathematically
,
each
will
hit
more
than
60
home
runs
.
This
is
the
great
edge
the
two
Yankees
have
going
for
them
.
To
better
Ruth's
mark
,
neither
needs
a
spectacular
September
flourish
.
All
Mantle
needs
is
eight
more
home
runs
in
August
and
ten
in
September
,
and
he
will
establish
a
new
record
.
In
Ruth's
day
--
and
until
this
year
--
the
schedule
was
154
games
.
Baseball
commissioner
Ford
Frick
has
ruled
that
Ruth's
record
will
remain
official
unless
it
is
broken
in
154
games
.
)
``
Even
on
the
basis
of
154
games
,
this
is
the
ideal
situation
''
,
insists
Hank
Greenberg
,
now
vice-president
of
the
Chicago
White
Sox
.
``
It
has
to
be
easier
with
two
of
them
.
How
can
you
walk
Maris
to
get
to
Mantle
''
?
?
Roommates
:
Neither
Mantle
nor
Maris
,
understandably
,
will
predict
60
home
runs
for
himself
.
Although
both
concede
they
would
like
to
hit
60
,
they
stick
primarily
to
the
baseball
player's
standard
quote
:
``
The
important
thing
is
to
win
the
pennant
''
.
But
one
thing
is
for
certain
:
There
is
no
dissension
between
Mantle
,
the
American
League's
Most
Valuable
Player
in
1956
and
1957
,
and
Maris
,
the
MVP
in
1960
.
Each
enjoys
seeing
the
other
hit
home
runs
(
``
I
hope
Roger
hits
80
''
,
Mantle
says
)
,
and
each
enjoys
even
more
seeing
himself
hit
home
runs
(
``
and
I
hope
I
hit
81
''
)
.
The
sluggers
get
along
so
well
in
fact
,
that
with
their
families
at
home
for
the
summer
(
Mantle's
in
Dallas
,
Maris's
in
Kansas
City
)
,
they
are
rooming
together
.
Mantle
,
Maris
,
and
Bob
Cerv
,
a
utility
outfielder
,
share
an
apartment
in
Jamaica
,
Long
Island
,
not
far
from
New
York
International
Airport
.
The
three
pay
$251
a
month
for
four
rooms
(
kitchen
,
dining
room
,
living
room
,
and
bedroom
)
,
with
air-conditioning
and
new
modern
furniture
.
Mantle
and
Cerv
use
the
twin
beds
in
the
bedroom
;
;
Maris
sleeps
on
a
green
studio
couch
in
the
living
room
.
They
divide
up
the
household
chores
:
Cerv
does
most
of
the
cooking
(
breakfast
and
sandwich
snacks
,
with
dinner
out
)
,
Mantle
supplies
the
transportation
(
a
white
1961
Oldsmobile
convertible
)
,
and
Maris
drives
the
25-minute
course
from
the
apartment
house
to
Yankee
Stadium
.
Mantle
,
Maris
,
and
Cerv
probably
share
one
major-league
record
already
:
Among
them
,
they
have
fifteen
children
--
eight
for
Cerv
,
four
for
Mantle
,
and
three
for
Maris
.
As
roommates
,
teammates
,
and
home-run
mates
,
Mantle
,
29
,
who
broke
in
with
the
Yankees
ten
years
ago
,
and
Maris
,
26
,
who
came
to
the
Yankees
from
Kansas
City
two
years
ago
,
have
strikingly
similar
backgrounds
.
Both
were
scholastic
stars
in
football
,
basketball
,
and
baseball
(
Mantle
in
Commerce
,
Okla.
,
Maris
in
Fargo
,
N.D.
)
;
;
as
halfbacks
,
both
came
close
to
playing
football
at
the
University
of
Oklahoma
(
``
Sometimes
in
the
minors
''
,
Maris
recalls
,
``
I
wished
I
had
gone
to
Oklahoma
''
)
.
To
an
extent
,
the
two
even
look
alike
.
Both
have
blue
eyes
and
short
blond
hair
.
Both
are
6
feet
tall
and
weigh
between
195
and
200
pounds
,
but
Mantle
,
incredibly
muscular
(
he
has
a
17-1/2-inch
neck
)
,
looks
bigger
.
With
their
huge
backs
and
overdeveloped
shoulders
,
both
must
have
their
clothes
made
to
order
.
Maris
purchases
$100
suits
from
Simpson's
in
New
York
.
Mantle
,
more
concerned
with
dress
,
buys
his
suits
four
at
a
time
at
Neiman-Marcus
in
Dallas
and
pays
as
much
as
$250
each
.
Light
reading
:
Neither
Mantle
nor
Maris
need
fear
being
classified
an
intellectual
,
but
lately
Mantle
has
shown
unusual
devotion
to
an
intellectual
opus
,
Henry
Miller's
``
Tropic
of
Cancer
''
.
Mantle
so
appreciated
Miller's
delicate
literary
style
that
he
broadened
teammates'
minds
by
reading
sensitive
passages
aloud
during
road
trips
.
Mantle
is
not
normally
given
to
public
speaking
--
or
,
for
that
matter
,
to
private
speaking
.
``
What
do
you
and
Mickey
talk
about
at
home
''
?
?
A
reporter
asked
Maris
recently
.
``
To
tell
you
the
truth
''
,
Maris
said
,
``
Mickey
don't
talk
much
''
.
This
is
no
surprising
trait
for
a
ballplayer
.
What
is
surprising
and
pleasant
is
that
Mantle
and
Maris
,
under
constant
pressure
from
writers
and
photographers
,
are
trying
to
be
cooperative
.
Of
the
two
,
Mantle
is
by
nature
the
less
outgoing
,
Maris
the
more
outspoken
.
But
last
week
,
when
a
reporter
was
standing
near
Mantle's
locker
,
Mickey
walked
up
and
volunteered
an
anecdote
.
``
See
that
kid
''
?
?
He
said
,
pointing
to
a
dark-haired
11-year-old
boy
.
``
That's
(
Yogi
)
Berra's
.
I'll
never
forget
one
time
I
struck
out
three
times
,
dropped
a
fly
ball
,
and
we
lost
the
game
.
I
came
back
,
sitting
by
my
locker
,
feeling
real
low
,
and
the
kid
walks
over
to
me
,
looks
up
,
and
says
:
'
You
stunk
'
''
.
Maris
,
in
talking
to
reporters
,
tries
to
answer
all
questions
candidly
and
fully
,
but
on
rare
occasions
,
he
shuns
newsmen
.
``
When
I've
made
a
dumb
play
''
,
he
says
,
``
I
don't
want
to
talk
to
anyone
.
I'm
angry
''
.
By
his
own
confession
,
Maris
is
an
angry
young
man
.
Benched
at
Tulsa
in
1955
,
he
told
manager
Dutch
Meyer
:
``
I
can't
play
for
you
.
Send
me
where
I
can
play
''
.
(
Meyer
sent
him
to
Reading
,
Pa.
.
)
Benched
at
Indianapolis
in
1956
,
he
told
manager
Kerby
Farrell
:
``
I'm
not
learning
anything
on
the
bench
.
Play
me
''
.
(
Farrell
did
--
and
Maris
led
the
team
to
victory
in
the
Little
World
Series
.
)
``
That's
the
way
I
am
''
,
he
says
.
``
I
tell
people
what
I
think
.
If
you're
a
good
ballplayer
,
you've
got
to
get
mad
.
Give
me
a
team
of
nine
angry
men
and
I'll
give
you
a
team
of
nine
gentlemen
and
we'll
beat
you
nine
out
of
ten
times
''
.
Idols'
idols
:
One
good
indication
of
the
two
men's
personalities
is
the
way
they
reacted
to
meeting
their
own
heroes
.
Maris's
was
Ted
Williams
.
``
When
I
was
a
kid
''
,
Maris
told
a
sportswriter
last
week
,
``
I
used
to
follow
Williams
every
day
in
the
box
score
,
just
to
see
whether
he
got
a
hit
or
not
''
.
``
When
you
came
up
to
the
majors
,
did
you
seek
out
Williams
for
advice
''
?
?
``
Are
you
kidding
''
?
?
Said
Maris
.
``
You're
afraid
to
talk
to
a
guy
you
idolize
''
.
Mantle's
hero
was
Joe
DiMaggio
.
``
When
Mickey
went
to
the
Yankees
''
,
says
Mark
Freeman
,
an
ex-Yankee
pitcher
who
sells
mutual
funds
in
Denver
,
``
DiMaggio
still
was
playing
and
every
day
Mickey
would
go
by
his
locker
,
just
aching
for
some
word
of
encouragement
from
this
great
man
,
this
hero
of
his
.
But
DiMaggio
never
said
a
word
.
It
crushed
Mickey
.
He
told
me
he
vowed
right
then
that
if
he
ever
got
to
be
a
star
,
this
never
would
be
said
of
him
''
.
Mantle
has
kept
the
vow
.
Among
all
the
Yankees
,
he
is
the
veteran
most
friendly
to
rookies
.
Neither
Mantle
nor
Maris
is
totally
devoted
to
baseball
above
all
else
.
If
laying
ties
on
a
railroad
track
,
which
he
once
did
for
$1
an
hour
,
paid
more
than
playing
right
field
for
the
Yankees
,
Maris
would
lay
ties
on
a
railroad
track
.
If
working
in
a
zinc
mine
,
which
he
once
did
for
87-1/2
cents
an
hour
,
paid
more
than
playing
center
field
for
the
Yankees
,
Mantle
would
work
in
a
zinc
mine
.
But
since
railroading
and
mining
are
not
the
highest
paid
arts
,
Mantle
and
Maris
concentrate
on
baseball
.
They
try
to
play
baseball
the
best
they
can
.
Each
is
a
complete
ballplayer
.
Mantle
,
beyond
any
question
,
can
do
more
things
well
.
(
``
One
of
the
reasons
they
get
along
fine
''
,
says
a
sportswriter
who
is
friendly
with
the
two
men
,
``
is
that
both
realize
Mantle
is
head-and-shoulders
above
Maris
''
.
)
Hitting
,
Mantle
has
an
immediate
advantage
because
he
bats
both
left-handed
and
right-handed
,
Maris
only
left-handed
.
They
both
possess
near
classic
stances
,
dug
in
firmly
,
arms
high
,
set
for
fierce
swings
.
Mantle
is
considerably
better
hitting
for
average
(
,
fourth
in
the
league
,
to
for
Maris
so
far
this
year
)
.
Both
are
good
bunters
:
Maris
once
beat
out
eighteen
of
nineteen
in
the
minor
leagues
;
;
Mantle
is
a
master
at
dragging
a
bunt
toward
first
base
.
Both
have
brilliant
speed
:
Mantle
was
timed
from
home
plate
(
batting
left-handed
)
to
first
base
in
3.1
seconds
,
faster
than
any
other
major
leaguer
;
;
Maris
ran
the
100-yard
dash
in
ten
seconds
in
high
school
and
once
won
a
race
against
Luis
Aparicio
,
the
swift
,
base-stealing
shortstop
of
the
White
Sox
.
Both
are
good
,
daring
fielders
:
Mantle
covers
more
ground
;
;
Maris's
throwing
arm
is
stronger
.
Yet
with
all
their
skills
,
the
appeal
of
Mantle
and
Maris
in
1961
comes
down
to
one
basic
:
The
home
run
.
With
this
ultimate
weapon
,
the
two
Yankees
may
have
saved
baseball
from
its
dullest
season
.
(
American
League
expansion
created
,
inevitably
,
weaker
teams
.
Only
two
teams
in
each
league
(
the
Yankees
and
Detroit
,
the
Dodgers
and
Cincinnati
)
are
battling
for
first
place
.
Appropriately
,
the
emphasis
on
the
home
run
,
at
a
peak
this
year
,
came
into
being
at
baseball's
lowest
moment
.
In
1920
,
as
the
startling
news
that
the
1919
White
Sox
had
conspired
to
lose
the
World
Series
leaked
out
,
fans
grew
disillusioned
and
disinterested
in
baseball
.
Something
was
needed
to
revive
interest
;
;
the
something
was
the
home
run
.
Into
Washington
on
President-elect
John
F.
Kennedy's
Convair
,
the
Caroline
,
winged
Actor-Crooner
Frank
Sinatra
and
his
close
Hollywood
pal
,
Cinemactor
Peter
Lawford
,
Jack
Kennedy's
brother-in-law
.
Also
included
in
the
entourage
:
a
dog
in
a
black
sweater
,
Frankie
and
Peter
had
an
urgent
mission
:
to
stage
a
mammoth
Inauguration
Eve
entertainment
gala
in
the
capital's
National
Guard
Armory
.
Frankie
was
fairly
glutted
with
ideas
,
as
he
had
hinted
upon
his
arrival
:
``
It's
really
tremendous
when
you
think
Ella
Fitzgerald
is
coming
from
Australia
.
I
could
talk
to
you
for
three
hours
and
still
not
be
able
to
give
you
all
of
our
plans
''
!
!
As
the
plans
were
laid
,
some
several
thousand
fat
cats
were
to
be
ensconced
in
the
armory's
$100
seats
and
in
68
ringside
boxes
priced
at
$10,000
each
.
The
biggest
single
act
would
doubtless
be
staged
by
Frankie
himself
:
his
Inaugural
wardrobe
had
been
designed
by
Hollywood
Couturier
Don
Loper
,
who
regularly
makes
up
ladies'
ensembles
.
Soon
after
Loper
leaked
the
news
that
Frankie
had
ordered
``
two
of
everything
''
just
``
in
case
he
spills
anything
''
,
Frankie
got
so
mad
at
the
chic
designer
that
he
vowed
he
would
not
wear
a
stitch
of
Loper
clothing
.
A
year
after
he
was
catapulted
over
nine
officers
senior
to
him
and
made
commandant
of
the
Marine
Corps
,
General
David
M.
Shoup
delivered
a
peppery
annual
report
in
the
form
of
a
``
happy
,
warless
New
Year
''
greeting
to
his
Pentagon
staff
.
Said
Leatherneck
Shoup
:
``
A
year
ago
I
took
the
grips
of
the
plow
in
my
hands
.
After
pushing
an
accumulation
of
vines
and
weeds
from
the
moldboard
,
I
lifted
the
lines
from
the
dust
and
found
hitched
to
that
plow
the
finest
team
I
ever
held
a
rein
on
.
Little
geeing
and
hawing
have
been
necessary
''
.
But
Shoup
also
gave
the
Corps
a
tilling
in
spots
.
Speaking
of
``
pride
''
,
he
deplored
the
noncommissioned
officer
``
whose
uniform
looks
like
it
belonged
to
someone
who
retired
in
1940
;
;
the
officer
with
the
yellow
socks
or
the
bay
window
.
A
few
of
these
people
are
still
around
''
.
Old
and
new
briefly
crossed
paths
in
the
U.S.
Senate
,
then
went
their
respective
ways
.
At
a
reception
for
new
members
of
Congress
,
Oregon
Democrat
Maurine
Neuberger
,
taking
the
Senate
seat
held
by
her
husband
Richard
until
his
death
last
March
,
got
a
brotherly
buss
from
Democratic
Elder
Statesman
Adlai
Stevenson
,
U.S.
Ambassador-designate
to
the
U.N.
.
Meanwhile
,
after
24
years
in
the
Senate
,
Rhode
Island's
durable
Democrat
Theodore
Francis
Greene
--
having
walked
,
swum
and
cerebrated
himself
to
the
hearty
age
of
93
--
left
that
august
body
(
voluntarily
,
because
he
could
surely
have
been
re-elected
had
he
chosen
to
run
again
last
November
)
,
as
the
oldest
man
ever
to
serve
in
the
Senate
.
The
most
famous
undergraduate
of
South
Philadelphia
High
School
is
a
current
bobby-sox
idol
,
Dreamboat
Cacophonist
Fabian
(
real
name
:
Fabian
Forte
)
,
17
,
and
last
week
it
developed
that
he
will
remain
an
undergraduate
for
a
while
.
The
principal
of
the
school
announced
that
--
despite
the
help
of
private
tutors
in
Hollywood
and
Philadelphia
--
Fabian
is
a
10-o'clock
scholar
in
English
and
mathematics
.
Lacking
his
needed
credits
in
those
subjects
,
Fabian
will
not
graduate
with
his
old
classmates
next
week
.
South
Philadelphia
High's
principal
added
that
the
current
delay
was
caused
by
the
``
pressure
''
of
a
movie
that
the
toneless
lad
was
making
.
To
Decathlon
Man
Rafer
Johnson
(
Time
cover
,
Aug.
29
)
,
whose
gold
medal
in
last
summer's
Olympic
Games
was
won
as
much
on
gumption
as
talent
,
went
the
A.A.U.'s
James
E.
Sullivan
Memorial
Trophy
as
the
outstanding
U.S.
amateur
athlete
of
1960
.
As
the
world's
top
sportsman
--
pro
or
amateur
--
Sports
Illustrated
tapped
golf's
confident
Arnold
Palmer
(
Time
cover
,
May
2
)
,
who
staged
two
cliffhanging
rallies
to
win
both
the
Masters
and
U.S.
Open
crowns
,
went
on
to
win
a
record
$80,738
for
the
year
.
Tooling
through
Sydney
on
his
way
to
race
in
the
New
Zealand
Grand
Prix
,
Britain's
balding
Ace
Driver
Stirling
Moss
,
31
,
all
but
smothered
himself
in
his
own
exhaust
of
self-crimination
.
``
I'm
a
slob
''
,
he
announced
.
``
My
taste
is
gaudy
.
I'm
useless
for
anything
but
racing
cars
.
I'm
ruddy
lazy
,
and
I'm
getting
on
in
years
.
It
gets
so
frustrating
,
but
then
again
I
don't
know
what
I
could
do
if
I
gave
up
racing
''
.
Has
Moss
no
stirling
virtues
?
?
``
I
appreciate
beauty
''
.
One
of
Nikita
Khrushchev's
most
enthusiastic
eulogizers
,
the
U.S.S.R.'s
daily
Izvestia
,
enterprisingly
interviewed
Red-prone
Comedian
Charlie
Chaplin
at
his
Swiss
villa
,
where
he
has
been
in
self-exile
since
1952
.
Chaplin
,
71
,
who
met
K.
when
the
Soviet
boss
visited
England
in
1956
,
confided
that
he
hopes
to
visit
Russia
some
time
this
summer
because
``
I
have
marveled
at
your
grandiose
experiment
and
I
believe
in
your
future
''
.
Then
Charlie
spooned
out
some
quick
impressions
of
the
Nikita
he
had
glimpsed
:
``
I
was
captivated
by
his
humor
,
frankness
and
good
nature
and
by
his
kind
,
strong
and
somewhat
sly
face
''
.
G.
David
Thompson
is
one
of
those
names
known
to
the
stewards
of
transatlantic
jetliners
and
to
doormen
in
Europe's
best
hotels
,
but
he
is
somewhat
of
an
enigma
to
most
people
in
his
own
home
town
of
Pittsburgh
.
There
the
name
vaguely
connotes
new-rich
wealth
,
a
reputation
for
eccentricity
,
and
an
ardor
for
collecting
art
.
Last
week
,
in
the
German
city
of
Dusseldorf
,
G.
David
Thompson
was
making
headlines
that
could
well
give
Pittsburgh
pause
.
On
display
were
343
first-class
paintings
and
sculptures
from
his
fabled
collection
--
and
every
single
one
of
them
was
up
for
sale
.
Like
Philadelphia's
late
Dr.
Albert
C.
Barnes
who
kept
his
own
great
collection
closed
to
the
general
public
(
Time
,
Jan.
2
)
,
Thompson
,
at
61
,
is
something
of
a
legend
in
his
own
lifetime
.
He
made
his
fortune
during
World
War
2
,
when
he
took
over
a
number
of
dying
steel
plants
and
kept
them
alive
until
the
boom
.
Even
before
he
hit
big
money
,
he
had
begun
buying
modern
paintings
.
He
gave
the
impression
of
never
having
read
a
word
about
art
,
but
there
was
no
doubt
that
he
had
an
eye
for
the
best
.
He
was
able
to
smell
a
bargain
--
and
a
masterpiece
--
a
continent
away
,
and
the
Museum
of
Modern
Art's
Alfred
Barr
said
of
him
:
``
I
have
never
mentioned
a
new
artist
that
Thompson
didn't
know
about
''
.
He
might
barge
into
a
gallery
,
start
haggling
over
prices
without
so
much
as
a
word
of
greeting
.
He
could
be
lavishly
generous
with
friends
,
cab
drivers
and
bellboys
,
but
with
dealers
he
was
tough
.
He
bought
up
Cezannes
,
Braques
,
Matisses
,
Legers
,
a
splendid
Picasso
series
,
more
than
70
Giacometti
sculptures
.
He
gathered
one
of
the
biggest
collections
of
Paul
Klees
in
the
world
.
All
these
he
hung
in
his
burglarproof
home
called
Stone's
Throw
,
outside
Pittsburgh
,
and
only
people
he
liked
and
trusted
ever
got
to
see
them
.
Two
years
ago
Thompson
offered
his
collection
to
the
city
.
But
he
insisted
that
it
be
housed
in
a
special
museum
.
Pittsburgh
turned
him
down
,
just
as
Pittsburgh
society
had
been
snubbing
him
for
years
.
He
went
then
to
a
40-year-old
Basel
art
dealer
named
Ernst
Beyeler
,
with
whom
he
had
long
been
trading
pictures
.
Last
year
Beyeler
arranged
to
sell
$1,500,000
worth
of
Klees
to
the
state
of
North
Rhine-Westphalia
,
which
will
house
them
in
a
museum
that
is
yet
to
be
built
.
Last
week
most
of
the
other
prizes
,
once
offered
to
Pittsburgh
,
went
on
the
block
.
At
the
opening
of
the
Dusseldorf
show
,
Thompson
himself
scarcely
glanced
at
the
treasures
that
he
was
seeing
together
for
the
last
time
.
In
fact
he
seemed
delighted
to
get
rid
of
them
.
Some
observers
speculated
that
this
might
be
his
revenge
on
his
home
town
.
Thompson
himself
said
:
``
I
want
to
enjoy
once
more
the
pleasure
of
bare
walls
waiting
for
new
pictures
''
.
Break
in
Georgia
The
University
of
Georgia
has
long
claimed
that
it
does
not
discriminate
against
any
applicant
on
the
basis
of
race
or
color
.
But
in
all
its
175
years
,
not
a
single
Negro
student
has
entered
its
classrooms
.
Last
week
Federal
District
Judge
William
A.
Bootle
ordered
the
university
to
admit
immediately
a
``
qualified
''
Negro
boy
and
girl
.
Their
entry
will
crack
the
total
segregation
of
all
public
education
,
from
kindergarten
through
graduate
school
,
in
Georgia
--
and
in
Alabama
,
Mississippi
and
South
Carolina
as
well
.
For
18
months
,
Hamilton
Holmes
,
19
,
and
Charlayne
Hunter
,
18
,
had
tried
to
get
into
the
university
.
They
graduated
together
from
Atlanta's
Turner
High
School
,
where
Valedictorian
Holmes
was
first
in
the
class
and
Charlayne
third
.
The
university
rejected
them
on
a
variety
of
pretexts
,
but
was
careful
never
to
mention
the
color
of
their
skins
.
Holmes
went
to
Atlanta's
Morehouse
(
Negro
)
College
,
where
he
is
a
B
student
and
star
halfback
.
Charlayne
studied
journalism
at
Detroit's
Wayne
State
University
.
Last
fall
,
after
they
took
their
hopes
for
entering
Georgia
to
court
,
Judge
Bootle
ordered
them
to
apply
again
.
Charlayne
was
``
tentatively
''
admitted
for
next
fall
,
after
state
investigators
questioned
her
white
roommate
at
Wayne
State
.
But
Holmes
was
rejected
again
``
on
the
basis
of
his
record
and
interview
''
.
The
evidence
in
court
was
testimony
about
the
interview
,
which
for
Holmes
lasted
an
hour
,
although
at
least
one
white
student
at
Georgia
got
through
this
ritual
by
a
simple
phone
conversation
.
Holmes
was
asked
if
he
had
ever
visited
a
house
of
prostitution
,
or
a
``
beatnik
parlor
or
teahouse
''
.
No
,
said
he
,
but
officials
still
called
him
``
evasive
''
.
They
also
said
he
lied
in
saying
that
he
had
never
been
``
arrested
''
.
Their
reason
:
Holmes
once
paid
a
$20
speeding
fine
,
had
his
license
suspended
.
Negro
lawyers
dug
into
the
records
of
300
white
students
,
found
that
many
were
hardly
interviewed
at
all
--
and
few
had
academic
records
as
good
as
Hamilton
Holmes
.
The
real
reason
for
his
rejection
,
they
argued
,
is
the
fact
that
Georgia
law
automatically
cuts
off
funds
for
any
desegregated
school
.
Judge
Bootle's
decision
:
``
The
two
plaintiffs
are
qualified
for
admission
to
said
university
and
would
already
have
been
admitted
had
it
not
been
for
their
race
and
color
''
.
The
state
will
appeal
--
but
few
think
it
will
actually
try
to
close
the
university
.
``
Surprised
and
pleased
''
,
Students
Holmes
and
Hunter
may
enter
the
University
of
Georgia
this
week
.
Catch
for
Chicago
When
the
University
of
Chicago's
Chancellor
Lawrence
A.
Kimpton
submitted
his
resignation
last
March
,
a
mighty
talent
hunt
gripped
the
Midway
.
Out
went
letters
to
60,000
old
grads
,
asking
for
suggestions
.
Such
academic
statesmen
as
James
B.
Conant
were
consulted
.
Two
committees
pondered
375
possible
Kimpton
successors
,
including
Adlai
Stevenson
,
Richard
Nixon
,
and
Harvard's
Dean
McGeorge
Bundy
.
The
debate
led
to
a
decision
that
Chicago
needed
neither
a
big
name
nor
an
experienced
academic
administrator
,
but
rather
,
as
Trustee
Chairman
Glen
A.
Lloyd
put
it
,
``
a
top
scholar
in
his
own
right
''
--
a
bright
light
to
lure
other
top
scholars
to
Chicago
.
Last
week
Chicago
happily
found
its
top
scholar
in
Caltech's
acting
dean
of
the
faculty
:
dynamic
Geneticist
George
Wells
Beadle
,
57
,
who
shared
the
1958
Nobel
Prize
in
medicine
and
physiology
for
discovering
how
genes
affect
heredity
by
controlling
cell
chemistry
(
Time
,
Cover
,
July
14
,
1958
)
.
It
fell
to
Chancellor
Kimpton
,
now
a
Standard
Oil
(
Indiana
)
executive
,
to
spend
his
nine-year
reign
tidying
up
Chicago
after
the
21-year
typhoon
of
Idealist
Robert
Maynard
Hutchins
.
He
threw
out
some
of
Hutchins'
more
wildly
experimental
courses
,
raised
sagging
undergraduate
enrollment
to
2,100
,
nearly
doubled
endowment
to
$139.3
million
.
But
though
Kimpton
put
Chicago
in
what
he
felt
was
working
order
,
some
old
grads
feel
that
it
still
needs
the
kind
of
lively
teachers
who
filled
it
in
the
heady
Hutchins
era
.
At
Caltech
,
Geneticist
Beadle
has
stuck
close
to
his
research
as
head
of
the
school's
famous
biology
division
since
1946
.
But
he
has
shown
a
sixth-sense
ability
to
spot
,
recruit
and
excite
able
researchers
,
and
has
developed
unexpected
talents
in
fund
raising
and
speech-making
.
Beadle
is
even
that
rare
scientist
who
takes
an
interest
in
money
matters
;
;
he
avidly
reads
the
Wall
Street
Journal
,
and
took
delight
in
driving
a
$250
model
A
Ford
for
22
years
,
then
selling
it
for
$300
.
A
philosopher
may
point
out
that
the
troubles
of
the
Congo
began
with
the
old
Adam
and
consequently
will
never
end
.
But
a
historian
might
put
his
finger
on
a
specific
man
and
date
,
and
hold
out
the
hope
that
the
troubles
will
sometime
pass
away
.
The
man
was
King
Leopold
2
,
of
the
Belgians
,
who
in
1885
concluded
that
he
had
better
grab
a
colony
while
the
grabbing
was
still
good
.
By
force
,
he
took
under
his
protection
,
or
stole
,
900,000
square
miles
of
wilderness
in
Central
Africa
.
This
is
an
area
nearly
as
large
as
Western
Europe
;
;
and
it
was
filled
then
as
now
by
quarreling
tribes
with
no
political
or
historical
unity
.
Its
boundaries
had
nothing
to
do
with
geography
or
ethnic
groupings
;
;
they
were
determined
by
the
points
at
which
Leopold's
explorers
and
gunmen
got
tired
of
walking
.
The
population
of
the
Congo
is
13.5
million
,
divided
into
at
least
seven
major
``
culture
clusters
''
and
innumerable
tribes
speaking
400
separate
dialects
.
The
religions
of
the
people
include
Christianity
,
Mohammedanism
,
paganism
,
ancestor
worship
and
animism
.
The
climate
ranges
from
the
steamily
equatorial
to
the
temperate
.
The
hospitals
contain
patients
trampled
by
elephants
or
run
over
by
sports
cars
.
To
make
one
nation
out
of
these
disparities
would
be
a
problem
large
enough
in
any
case
;
;
it
has
been
made
far
more
difficult
by
what
the
Belgians
have
done
,
or
failed
to
do
,
in
the
Congo
since
1885
.
At
first
the
Belgian
royal
family
administered
the
Congo
as
its
own
private
property
.
But
by
1908
its
record
of
brutality
had
touched
the
national
conscience
.
The
Belgian
government
itself
took
over
administration
,
commencing
a
program
of
paternalism
unmatched
in
the
history
of
colonialism
.
One
definition
of
paternalism
is
``
The
principle
or
practice
,
on
the
part
of
a
government
,
of
managing
the
affairs
of
a
country
in
the
manner
of
a
father
dealing
with
his
children
''
.
The
honor
of
the
Belgians
in
this
matter
is
not
to
be
questioned
--
only
their
judgment
.
Ordinarily
a
father
permits
his
children
to
grow
up
in
due
time
--
but
when
the
colony
received
independence
in
1960
the
Congolese
child
,
if
one
imagines
him
to
have
been
born
in
1908
,
was
52
and
had
until
then
been
treated
as
an
infant
.
The
Belgians
were
interested
primarily
in
the
economic
development
of
the
Congo
,
which
is
rich
in
copper
,
tin
,
cobalt
,
manganese
,
zinc
,
and
uranium
,
and
cotton
and
palm
oil
.
The
colony
was
administered
from
Brussels
,
with
neither
the
Congolese
nor
the
resident
Belgians
having
any
vote
.
The
beneficiaries
of
this
administration
were
a
number
of
huge
cartels
in
which
both
individuals
and
the
Belgian
government
itself
held
stock
.
In
Inside
Africa
,
John
Gunther
describes
one
of
these
,
the
Societe
Generale
,
as
``
the
kind
of
colossus
that
might
be
envisaged
if
,
let
us
say
,
the
House
of
Morgan
,
Anaconda
Copper
,
the
Mutual
Life
Insurance
Company
of
New
York
,
the
Pennsylvania
Railroad
,
and
various
companies
producing
agricultural
products
were
lumped
together
,
with
the
United
States
government
as
a
heavy
partner
''
.
Had
they
been
truly
ruthless
,
the
Belgians
might
have
exploited
the
Congolese
without
compassion
.
But
they
were
not
.
They
provided
a
social
security
system
which
covered
all
their
African
employes
;
;
their
program
of
mass
medical
care
was
doubtless
the
best
on
the
continent
;
;
they
put
much
effort
into
public
housing
.
They
also
instituted
a
ration
system
under
which
all
employers
in
the
Congo
were
required
to
furnish
their
employes
with
clothing
and
adequate
food
.
But
instead
of
delivering
the
ration
--
either
in
actual
commodities
or
in
cash
--
at
intervals
of
perhaps
two
weeks
or
a
month
,
the
Belgians
felt
obliged
to
dole
it
out
more
often
.
Would
not
the
children
,
if
they
received
all
their
food
on
the
first
day
of
the
month
,
eat
it
up
immediately
,
and
later
go
hungry
?
?
The
Belgians
also
placed
great
emphasis
on
education
.
During
the
1950s
there
were
as
many
as
25,000
schools
in
the
Congo
.
But
almost
all
the
schools
were
primary
.
The
average
Congolese
can
do
little
more
than
puzzle
out
the
meaning
of
``
la
chatte
''
and
``
le
chien
''
and
write
his
name
.
Some
schools
were
technical
--
the
Belgians
needed
carpenters
and
mechanics
to
help
exploit
the
land
,
and
trained
many
.
But
they
did
not
believe
in
widespread
secondary
education
,
much
less
in
college
.
It
was
their
conviction
that
the
people
should
be
``
brought
up
together
''
,
a
grade
at
a
time
,
until
in
some
indefinite
future
some
might
be
ready
to
tackle
history
,
economics
and
political
science
.
Indeed
,
the
Belgians
discouraged
higher
education
,
fearing
the
creation
of
a
native
intellectual
elite
which
might
cause
unrest
.
When
the
Congo
received
its
independence
in
1960
there
were
,
among
its
13.5
million
people
,
exactly
14
university
graduates
.
Why
did
the
Belgians
grant
independence
to
a
colony
so
manifestly
unprepared
to
accept
it
?
?
In
one
large
oversimplification
,
it
might
be
said
that
the
Belgians
felt
,
far
too
late
,
the
gale
of
nationalism
sweeping
Africa
.
They
lacked
time
to
prepare
the
Congo
,
as
the
British
and
French
had
prepared
their
colonies
.
The
Congolese
were
clamoring
for
their
independence
,
even
though
most
were
unsure
what
it
meant
;
;
and
in
Brussels
,
street
crowds
shouted
,
``
Pas
une
goutte
de
sang
!
!
''
(
Not
one
drop
of
blood
!
!
)
.
The
Belgians
would
not
fight
for
the
privilege
of
being
the
detested
pedagogue
;
;
rather
than
teach
where
teaching
was
not
wanted
,
they
would
wash
their
hands
of
the
mess
.
It
is
hard
to
blame
them
for
this
.
Yet
there
were
other
motivations
and
actions
which
the
Belgians
took
after
independence
for
which
history
may
not
find
them
guiltless
.
As
the
time
for
independence
approached
there
were
in
the
Congo
no
fewer
than
120
political
parties
,
or
approximately
eight
for
each
university
graduate
.
There
were
four
principal
ones
.
First
,
there
were
those
Congolese
(
among
them
Joseph
Kasavubu
)
who
favored
splitting
the
country
into
small
independent
states
,
Balkanizing
it
.
Second
,
there
were
those
(
Moise
Tshombe
)
who
favored
near-Balkanization
,
a
loose
federalism
having
a
central
government
of
limited
authority
,
with
much
power
residing
in
the
states
.
Third
,
there
were
those
(
notably
Patrice
Lumumba
)
who
favored
a
unified
Congo
with
a
very
strong
central
government
.
And
fourth
,
there
were
moderates
who
were
in
no
hurry
for
independence
and
wished
to
wait
until
the
Congo
grew
up
.
However
,
the
positions
of
all
parties
and
leaders
were
constantly
shifting
.
A
final
factor
which
contributed
greatly
to
the
fragmentation
of
the
Congo
,
immediately
after
independence
,
was
the
provincial
structure
that
had
been
established
by
the
Belgians
for
convenience
in
administration
.
They
had
divided
the
Congo
into
six
provinces
--
Leopoldville
,
Kasai
,
Kivu
,
Katanga
,
Equator
and
Eastern
--
unfortunately
with
little
regard
for
ethnic
groupings
.
Thus
some
provinces
contained
tribes
which
detested
each
other
,
and
to
them
independence
meant
an
opportunity
for
war
.
The
Belgian
Congo
was
granted
its
independence
with
what
seemed
a
workable
Western-style
form
of
government
:
there
were
to
be
a
president
and
a
premier
,
and
a
bicameral
legislature
elected
by
universal
suffrage
in
the
provinces
.
Well-wishers
around
the
world
hoped
that
the
Congo
would
quickly
assume
a
respectable
position
in
the
society
of
nations
.
If
internal
frictions
arose
,
they
could
be
handled
by
the
25,000-man
Congolese
army
,
the
Force
Publique
,
which
had
been
trained
and
was
still
officered
by
white
Belgians
.
The
president
,
Joseph
Kasavubu
,
seemed
an
able
administrator
and
the
premier
,
Patrice
Lumumba
,
a
reasonable
man
.
Twenty-four
hours
after
independence
the
wild
tribesmen
commenced
fighting
each
other
.
Presently
the
well-armed
members
of
the
Force
Publique
--
many
of
them
drawn
from
savage
and
even
cannibalistic
tribes
,
erupted
in
mutiny
,
rioting
,
raping
and
looting
.
Terror
engulfed
the
thousands
of
Belgian
civilians
who
had
remained
in
the
country
.
The
Belgian
government
decided
to
act
,
and
on
July
10
dispatched
paratroops
to
the
Congo
.
On
July
11
the
head
of
the
mineral-rich
province
of
Katanga
,
Moise
Tshombe
,
announced
that
his
province
had
seceded
from
the
country
.
Confusion
became
chaos
;
;
each
succeeding
day
brought
new
acts
of
violence
.
Lumumba
and
Kasavubu
blamed
it
all
on
the
military
intervention
by
the
Belgians
,
and
appealed
to
the
United
Nations
to
send
troops
to
oust
them
.
On
July
14
the
Security
Council
--
with
France
and
Great
Britain
abstaining
--
voted
the
resolution
which
drew
the
U.N.
into
the
Congo
.
Vague
in
wording
,
it
called
for
withdrawal
of
Belgian
troops
and
authorized
the
Secretary-General
``
to
take
the
necessary
steps
to
provide
the
(
Congolese
)
Government
with
such
military
assistance
as
may
be
necessary
,
until
,
through
the
efforts
of
the
Congolese
Government
with
the
technical
assistance
of
the
United
Nations
,
the
national
security
forces
may
be
able
,
in
the
opinion
of
the
Government
,
to
meet
fully
their
tasks
.
''
Secretary-General
Hammarskjold
decided
that
it
would
be
preferable
if
the
U.N.
troops
sent
into
the
Congo
were
to
come
from
African
,
or
at
least
nonwhite
,
nations
--
certainly
not
from
the
U.S.
,
Russia
,
Great
Britain
or
France
.
He
quickly
called
on
Ghana
,
Tunisia
,
Morocco
,
Guinea
and
Mali
,
which
dispatched
troops
within
hours
.
Ultimately
the
U.N.
army
in
the
Congo
reached
a
top
strength
of
19,000
,
including
about
5,000
from
India
and
a
few
soldiers
from
Eire
and
Sweden
,
who
were
the
only
whites
.
It
took
the
U.N.
three
months
to
bring
a
modest
form
of
order
to
the
Congo
.
The
Belgians
were
reluctant
to
withdraw
their
troops
and
often
obstructed
U.N.
efforts
.
The
wildly
erratic
nature
of
Patrice
Lumumba
caused
constant
problems
--
he
frequently
announced
that
he
wanted
the
U.N.
to
get
out
of
the
Congo
along
with
the
Belgians
,
and
appealed
to
Russia
for
help
.
(
However
,
there
is
little
evidence
that
the
late
Lumumba
was
a
Communist
.
Before
appealing
to
the
U.N.
or
to
Russia
,
he
first
appealed
to
the
U.S.
for
military
help
,
and
was
rejected
.
)
Lumumba
further
complicated
the
U.N.'s
mission
by
initiating
small
``
wars
''
with
the
secessionist
province
of
Katanga
and
with
South
Kasai
which
,
under
Albert
Kalonji
,
wanted
to
secede
as
well
.
Meanwhile
Russia
took
every
opportunity
to
meddle
in
the
Congo
,
sending
Lumumba
equipment
for
his
``
wars
''
,
dispatching
``
technicians
''
and
even
threatening
,
on
occasion
,
to
intervene
openly
.
But
by
the
end
of
the
three-month
period
,
in
October
1960
,
something
approaching
calm
settled
on
the
Congo
.
President
Kasavubu
became
exasperated
with
Lumumba
and
fired
him
.
Lumumba
fired
Kasavubu
.
Control
of
the
government
--
such
control
as
there
was
and
such
government
as
there
was
--
passed
into
the
hands
of
Joseph
Mobutu
,
chief
of
staff
of
the
Congolese
army
.
Mobutu
promptly
flung
out
the
Russians
,
who
have
not
since
played
any
significant
part
on
the
local
scene
,
although
they
have
redoubled
their
obstructionist
efforts
at
U.N.
headquarters
in
New
York
.
The
Belgians
--
at
least
officially
--
departed
from
the
Congo
as
well
,
withdrawing
all
of
their
uniformed
troops
.
But
they
left
behind
them
large
numbers
of
officers
,
variously
called
``
volunteers
''
or
``
mercenaries
''
,
who
now
staff
the
army
of
Moise
Tshombe
in
Katanga
,
the
seceded
province
which
,
according
to
Tshombe
,
holds
65%
of
the
mineral
wealth
of
the
entire
country
.
From
October
1960
to
February
1961
,
the
U.N.
forces
in
the
Congo
took
little
action
.
There
was
no
directive
for
it
--
the
Security
Council's
resolution
had
not
mentioned
political
matters
,
and
in
any
case
the
United
Nations
by
the
terms
of
its
charter
may
not
interfere
in
the
political
affairs
of
any
nation
,
whether
to
unify
it
,
federalize
it
or
Balkanize
it
.
During
the
five-month
lull
,
civil
war
smoldered
and
flickered
throughout
the
Congo
.
In
February
the
murder
of
Patrice
Lumumba
,
who
had
been
kidnaped
into
Katanga
and
executed
on
order
of
Tshombe
,
again
stirred
the
U.N.
to
action
.
On
Feb.
21
the
council
passed
another
resolution
urging
the
taking
of
``
all
appropriate
measures
to
prevent
the
occurrence
of
civil
war
in
the
Congo
,
including
the
use
of
force
,
if
necessary
,
in
the
last
resort
''
.
Although
the
resolution
might
have
been
far
more
specific
,
it
was
considerably
tougher
than
the
earlier
one
.
It
also
urged
that
the
U.N.
eject
,
and
prevent
the
return
of
,
all
Belgian
and
other
foreign
military
and
political
advisers
;
;
ordered
an
investigation
of
Lumumba's
death
;
;
urged
the
reconvention
of
the
Congolese
Parliament
and
the
reorganization
of
the
army
.
The
presidency
:
talking
and
listening
Though
President
John
F.
Kennedy
was
primarily
concerned
with
the
crucial
problems
of
Berlin
and
disarmament
adviser
McCloy's
unexpected
report
from
Khrushchev
,
his
new
enthusiasm
and
reliance
on
personal
diplomacy
involved
him
in
other
key
problems
of
U.S.
foreign
policy
last
week
.
High
up
on
the
President's
priority
list
was
the
thorny
question
of
Bizerte
.
On
this
issue
,
the
President
received
a
detailed
report
from
his
U.N.
Ambassador
Adlai
Stevenson
,
who
had
just
returned
from
Paris
,
and
Mr.
Kennedy
asked
Stevenson
to
search
for
a
face-saving
way
--
for
both
Paris
and
Tunis
--
out
of
the
imbroglio
.
Ideally
,
the
President
would
like
the
French
to
agree
on
a
``
status
quo
ante
''
on
Bizerte
,
and
accept
a
new
timetable
for
withdrawing
their
forces
from
the
Mediterranean
base
.
To
continue
their
important
conversations
about
the
Tunisian
issue
and
the
whole
range
of
other
problems
,
Mr.
Kennedy
invited
Stevenson
to
Cape
Cod
for
the
weekend
.
The
President
also
discussed
the
Bizerte
deadlock
with
the
No.
2
man
in
the
Tunisian
Government
,
Defense
Minister
Bahi
Ladgham
,
who
flew
to
Washington
last
week
to
seek
U.S.
support
.
The
conversation
apparently
convinced
Mr.
Kennedy
that
the
positions
of
France
and
Tunisia
were
not
irreconcilable
.
Through
Ladgham
,
Mr.
Kennedy
sent
a
message
along
those
lines
to
Tunisian
President
Habib
Bourguiba
;
;
and
one
U.S.
official
said
:
``
The
key
question
now
is
which
side
picks
up
the
phone
first
''
.
On
the
Latin
American
front
,
the
President
held
talks
with
Secretary
of
the
Treasury
Douglas
Dillon
before
sending
him
to
Uruguay
and
the
Inter-American
Economic
and
Social
Council
(
which
the
President
himself
had
originally
hoped
to
attend
)
.
Main
purpose
of
the
meeting
:
To
discuss
President
Kennedy's
Alliance
for
Progress
.
And
that
was
not
all
.
In
conferences
with
Nationalist
China's
dapper
,
diminutive
Vice
President
Chen
Cheng
,
Mr.
Kennedy
assured
Chiang
Kai-shek's
emissary
that
the
U.S.
is
as
firmly
opposed
as
ever
to
the
admission
of
Red
China
to
the
United
Nations
.
Chen
was
equally
adamant
in
his
opposition
to
the
admission
of
Outer
Mongolia
;
;
however
the
President
,
who
would
like
to
woo
the
former
Chinese
province
away
from
both
Peking
and
Moscow
,
would
promise
Chen
nothing
more
than
an
abstention
by
the
U.S.
if
Outer
Mongolia's
admission
comes
to
a
vote
.
The
President
also
conferred
with
emissaries
from
Guatemala
and
Nepal
who
are
seeking
more
foreign
aid
.
To
Africa
,
he
sent
his
most
trusted
adviser
,
his
brother
,
Attorney
General
Robert
Kennedy
,
on
a
good-will
mission
to
the
Ivory
Coast
.
All
week
long
the
President
clearly
was
playing
a
larger
personal
role
in
foreign
affairs
;
;
in
effect
,
he
was
practicing
what
he
preached
in
his
Berlin
message
two
weeks
ago
when
he
declared
:
``
We
shall
always
be
prepared
to
discuss
international
problems
with
any
and
all
nations
that
are
willing
to
talk
,
and
listen
,
with
reason
''
.
Crime
:
'
skyjacked
'
From
International
Airport
in
Los
Angeles
to
International
Airport
in
Houston
,
as
the
great
four-jet
Boeing
707
flies
,
is
a
routine
five
hours
and
25
minutes
,
including
stopovers
at
Phoenix
,
El
Paso
,
and
San
Antonio
.
When
Continental
Airlines
night-coach
Flight
54
took
off
at
11:30
one
night
last
week
,
there
was
no
reason
to
think
it
would
take
any
longer
.
The
plane
put
down
on
schedule
at
1:35
a.m.
in
Phoenix
.
Thirty-one
minutes
later
,
when
it
took
off
for
El
Paso
,
hardly
anyone
of
the
crew
of
six
or
the
65
other
passengers
paid
any
attention
to
the
man
and
teen-age
boy
who
had
come
aboard
.
At
3:57
a.m.
,
with
the
plane
about
twenty
minutes
out
of
El
Paso
,
passenger
Robert
Berry
,
a
San
Antonio
advertising
man
,
glanced
up
and
saw
the
man
and
boy
,
accompanied
by
a
stewardess
,
walking
up
the
aisle
toward
the
cockpit
.
``
The
man
was
bent
over
with
his
hand
on
his
stomach
''
,
Berry
said
.
``
I
figured
he
was
sick
''
.
John
Salvador
,
a
farmer
from
Palm
Desert
,
Calif.
,
was
sitting
up
front
and
could
see
through
the
door
as
the
trio
entered
the
cockpit
.
``
The
kid
had
a
automatic
,
like
they
issue
in
the
Army
''
,
he
said
.
``
The
other
fellow
had
a
''
.
Salvador
saw
the
youth
hold
his
against
the
head
of
stewardess
Lois
Carnegey
;
;
the
man
put
his
at
the
head
of
Capt.
Byron
D.
Rickards
.
To
Rickards
,
a
52-year-old
veteran
30
years
in
the
air
,
it
was
an
old
story
:
His
plane
was
being
hijacked
in
mid-flight
again
much
as
it
had
happened
in
1930
,
when
Peruvian
rebels
made
him
land
a
Ford
tri-motor
at
Arequipa
.
But
last
week's
pirates
,
like
the
Cuban-American
who
recently
hijacked
an
Eastern
Airlines
Electra
(
Newsweek
,
Aug.
7
)
,
wanted
to
go
to
Havana
.
Stalling
:
``
Tell
your
company
there
are
four
of
us
here
with
guns
''
,
the
elder
man
told
Rickards
.
The
pilot
radioed
El
Paso
International
Airport
with
just
that
message
.
But
,
he
told
the
``
skyjackers
''
,
the
707
didn't
carry
enough
fuel
to
reach
Havana
;
;
they
would
have
to
refuel
at
El
Paso
.
Most
passengers
didn't
know
what
had
happened
until
they
got
on
the
ground
.
Jerry
McCauley
of
Sacramento
,
Calif.
,
one
of
some
twenty
Air
Force
recruits
on
board
,
awoke
from
a
nap
in
confusion
.
``
The
old
man
came
from
the
front
of
the
plane
and
said
he
wanted
four
volunteers
to
go
to
Cuba
''
,
McCauley
said
,
``
and
like
a
nut
I
raised
my
hand
.
I
thought
he
was
the
Air
Force
recruiter
''
.
What
the
man
wanted
was
four
persons
to
volunteer
as
hostages
,
along
with
the
crew
.
They
chose
four
:
Jack
Casey
,
who
works
for
Continental
Airlines
in
Houston
;
;
Fred
Mullen
from
Mercer
Island
,
Wash.
;
;
Pfc.
Truman
Cleveland
of
St.
Augustine
.
Fla.
,
and
Leonard
Gilman
,
a
former
college
boxer
and
veteran
of
the
U.S.
Immigration
Service
Border
Patrol
.
Everybody
else
was
allowed
to
file
off
the
plane
after
it
touched
down
at
El
Paso
at
4:18
a.m.
.
They
found
a
large
welcoming
group
--
El
Paso
policemen
,
Border
Patrol
,
sheriff's
deputies
,
and
FBI
men
,
who
surged
around
the
plane
with
rifles
and
submachine
guns
.
Other
FBI
men
,
talking
with
the
pilot
from
the
tower
,
conspired
with
him
to
delay
the
proposed
flight
to
Havana
.
The
ground
crew
,
which
ordinarily
fuels
a
707
in
twenty
minutes
,
took
fully
three
hours
.
Still
more
time
was
consumed
while
the
pilot
,
at
the
radioed
suggestion
of
Continental
president
Robert
Six
,
tried
to
persuade
the
armed
pair
to
swap
the
Boeing
jet
for
a
propeller-driven
Douglas
Aj
.
Actually
,
the
officers
on
the
ground
had
no
intention
of
letting
the
hijackers
get
away
with
any
kind
of
an
airplane
;
;
they
had
orders
to
that
effect
straight
from
President
Kennedy
,
who
thought
at
first
,
as
did
most
others
,
that
it
was
four
followers
of
Cuba's
Fidel
Castro
who
had
taken
over
the
707
.
Mr.
Kennedy
had
been
informed
early
in
the
day
of
the
attempt
to
steal
the
plane
,
kept
in
touch
throughout
by
telephone
.
At
one
time
,
while
still
under
the
impression
that
he
was
dealing
with
a
Cuban
plot
,
the
President
talked
about
invoking
a
total
embargo
on
trade
with
Cuba
.
As
the
morning
wore
on
and
a
blazing
West
Texas
sun
wiped
the
shadows
off
the
Franklin
Mountains
,
police
got
close
enough
to
the
plane
to
pry
into
the
baggage
compartment
.
From
the
luggage
,
they
learned
that
the
two
air
pirates
,
far
from
being
Cubans
,
were
native
Americans
,
subsequently
identified
as
Leon
Bearden
,
50-year-old
ex-convict
from
Coolidge
,
Ariz.
,
and
his
son
,
Cody
,
16
,
a
high-school
junior
.
Tension
The
heat
and
strain
began
to
tell
on
the
Beardens
.
The
father
,
by
accident
or
perhaps
to
show
,
as
he
said
,
``
we
mean
business
''
,
took
the
and
fired
a
slug
between
the
legs
of
Second
Officer
Norman
Simmons
.
At
7:30
a.m.
,
more
than
three
hours
after
landing
,
the
Beardens
gave
an
ultimatum
:
Take
off
or
see
the
hostages
killed
.
The
tower
cleared
the
plane
for
take-off
at
8
a.m.
,
and
Captain
Rickards
began
taxiing
toward
the
runway
.
Several
police
cars
,
loaded
with
armed
officers
,
raced
alongside
,
blazing
away
at
the
tires
of
the
big
jet
.
The
slugs
flattened
ten
tires
and
silenced
one
of
the
inboard
engines
;
;
the
plane
slowed
to
a
halt
.
Ambulances
,
baggage
trucks
,
and
cars
surrounded
it
.
The
day
wore
on
.
At
12:50
p.m.
a
ramp
was
rolled
up
to
the
plane
.
A
few
minutes
later
,
FBI
agent
Francis
Crosby
,
talking
fast
,
eased
up
the
ramp
to
the
plane
,
unarmed
.
While
Crosby
distracted
the
Beardens
,
stewardesses
Carnegey
and
Toni
Besset
dropped
out
of
a
rear
door
.
So
did
hostages
Casey
,
Cleveland
,
and
Mullen
.
That
left
only
the
four
crew
members
,
Crosby
,
and
Border
Patrolman
Gilman
,
all
unarmed
,
with
the
Beardens
.
The
elder
Bearden
had
one
pistol
in
his
hand
,
the
other
in
a
hip
pocket
.
Gilman
started
talking
to
him
until
he
saw
his
chance
.
He
caught
officer
Simmons'
eye
,
nodded
toward
young
Bearden
,
and
--
``
I
swung
my
right
as
hard
as
I
could
.
Simmons
and
Crosby
jumped
the
boy
and
it
was
all
over
''
.
Frog-marched
off
the
airplane
at
1:48
p.m.
,
the
Beardens
were
held
in
bail
of
$100,000
each
on
charges
of
kidnapping
and
transporting
a
stolen
plane
across
state
lines
.
(
Bearden
reportedly
hoped
to
peddle
the
plane
to
Castro
,
and
live
high
in
Cuba
.
)
Back
home
in
Coolidge
,
Ariz.
,
his
36-year-old
wife
,
Mary
,
said
:
``
I
thought
they
were
going
to
Phoenix
to
look
for
jobs
''
.
Congress
:
more
muscle
Taking
precedence
over
all
other
legislation
on
Capitol
Hill
last
week
was
the
military
strength
of
the
nation
.
The
Senate
put
other
business
aside
as
it
moved
with
unaccustomed
speed
and
unanimity
to
pass
--
85
to
0
--
the
largest
peacetime
defense
budget
in
U.S.
history
.
With
the
money
all
but
in
hand
,
however
,
the
Administration
indicated
that
,
instead
of
the
225,000
more
men
in
uniform
that
President
Kennedy
had
requested
,
the
armed
forces
would
be
increased
by
only
160,000
.
The
``
hold-back
''
,
as
Pentagon
mutterers
labeled
it
,
apparently
was
a
temporary
expedient
intended
to
insure
that
the
army
services
are
built
up
gradually
and
,
thus
,
the
new
funds
spent
prudently
.
In
all
,
the
Senate
signed
a
check
for
$46.7
billion
,
which
not
only
included
the
extra
$3.5
billion
requested
the
week
before
by
President
Kennedy
,
but
tacked
on
$754
million
more
than
the
President
had
asked
for
.
(
The
Senate
,
on
its
own
,
decided
to
provide
additional
B-52
and
other
long-range
bombers
for
the
Strategic
Air
Command
.
)
The
House
,
which
had
passed
its
smaller
appropriation
before
the
President's
urgent
call
for
more
,
was
expected
to
go
along
with
the
increased
defense
budget
in
short
order
.
In
other
areas
,
Congressional
action
last
week
included
:
The
Senate
(
by
voice
vote
)
and
the
House
(
by
224-170
)
passed
and
sent
to
the
White
House
the
compromise
farm
bill
which
the
President
is
expected
to
sign
,
not
too
unhappily
.
The
Senate
also
voted
$5.2
billion
to
finance
the
government's
health
,
welfare
,
and
labor
activities
.
Debate
on
the
all-important
foreign-aid
bill
,
with
its
controversial
long-range
proposals
,
had
just
begun
on
the
Senate
floor
at
the
weekend
.
White
House
legislative
aides
were
still
confident
the
bill
would
pass
intact
.
Food
:
stew
a
la
Mulligatawny
Most
members
of
the
U.S.
Senate
,
because
they
are
human
,
like
to
eat
as
high
on
the
hog
as
they
can
.
But
,
because
they
are
politicians
,
they
like
to
talk
as
poor-mouth
as
the
lowliest
voter
.
As
a
result
,
ever
since
1851
when
the
Senate
restaurant
opened
in
the
new
wing
of
the
Capitol
Building
,
the
senators
have
never
ceased
to
grumble
about
the
food
--
even
while
they
opposed
every
move
that
might
improve
it
.
Over
the
years
,
enlivened
chiefly
by
disputes
about
the
relative
merits
of
Maine
and
Idaho
potatoes
,
the
menu
has
pursued
its
drab
all-American
course
.
Individual
senators
,
with
an
eye
to
the
voters
back
home
,
occasionally
introduced
smelts
from
Michigan
,
soft-shell
crabs
from
Maryland
,
oysters
from
Washington
,
grapefruit
from
Florida
.
But
plain
old
bean
soup
,
served
daily
since
the
turn
of
the
century
(
at
the
insistence
of
the
late
Sen.
Fred
Dubois
of
Idaho
)
,
made
clear
to
the
citizenry
that
the
Senate's
stomach
was
in
the
right
place
.
In
a
daring
stroke
,
the
Senate
ventured
forth
last
week
into
the
world
of
haute
cuisine
and
hired
a
$10,000-per-year
French-born
maitre
d'hotel
.
Holders
of
toll-road
bonds
are
finding
improvements
in
monthly
reports
on
operation
of
the
turnpikes
.
Long-term
trend
of
traffic
on
these
roads
seems
clearly
upward
.
Higher
toll
rates
also
are
helping
boost
revenues
.
Result
is
a
better
prospect
for
a
full
payoff
by
bonds
that
once
were
regarded
as
highly
speculative
.
Things
are
looking
up
these
days
for
many
of
the
State
turnpikes
on
which
investors
depend
for
income
from
their
toll-road
bonds
.
Traffic
on
nearly
all
the
turnpikes
has
been
growing
.
That
added
traffic
means
rising
streams
of
dimes
and
quarters
at
toll
gates
.
As
a
result
of
the
new
outlook
for
turnpikes
,
investors
who
bought
toll-road
bonds
when
these
securities
ranked
as
outright
speculations
are
now
finding
new
hope
for
their
investments
.
Another
result
is
that
buyers
are
tending
to
bid
up
the
prices
of
these
tax-exempt
bonds
.
Other
tax-exempt
bonds
of
State
and
local
governments
hit
a
price
peak
on
February
21
,
according
to
Standard
&
Poor's
average
.
On
balance
,
prices
of
those
bonds
have
slipped
a
bit
since
then
.
However
,
in
the
same
three-month
period
,
toll-road
bonds
,
as
a
group
,
have
bucked
this
trend
.
On
these
bonds
,
price
rises
since
February
21
easily
outnumber
price
declines
.
Tax-free
returns
.
Investors
,
however
,
still
see
an
element
of
more-than-ordinary
risk
in
the
toll-road
bonds
.
You
find
the
evidence
of
that
in
the
chart
on
this
page
.
Many
of
the
toll-road
bonds
still
are
selling
at
prices
that
offer
the
prospect
of
an
annual
yield
of
4
per
cent
,
or
very
close
to
that
.
And
this
is
true
in
the
case
of
some
turnpikes
on
which
revenues
have
risen
close
to
,
or
beyond
,
the
point
at
which
the
roads
start
to
pay
all
operating
costs
plus
annual
interest
on
the
bonds
.
That
4
per
cent
yield
is
well
below
the
return
to
be
had
on
good
corporation
bonds
.
It's
not
much
more
,
in
fact
,
than
the
return
that
is
offered
on
U.
S.
Treasury
bonds
.
For
investors
whose
income
is
taxed
at
high
rates
,
though
,
a
tax-free
yield
of
4
per
cent
is
high
.
It
is
the
equivalent
of
8
per
cent
for
an
unmarried
investor
with
more
than
$16,000
of
income
to
be
taxed
,
or
for
a
married
couple
with
more
than
$32,000
of
taxed
income
.
Swelling
traffic
.
A
new
report
on
the
earnings
records
of
toll
roads
in
the
most
recent
12-month
period
--
ending
in
February
or
March
--
shows
what
is
happening
.
The
report
is
based
on
a
survey
by
Blyth
&
Company
,
investment
bankers
.
Nearly
all
the
turnpikes
show
gains
in
net
revenues
during
the
period
.
And
there
is
the
bright
note
:
The
gains
were
achieved
in
the
face
of
temporary
traffic
lags
late
in
1960
and
early
in
1961
as
a
result
of
business
recession
.
Many
of
the
roads
also
were
hit
by
an
unusually
severe
winter
.
Indication
:
The
long-term
trend
of
turnpike
traffic
is
upward
.
Look
,
for
example
,
at
the
Ohio
Turnpike
.
Traffic
on
that
road
slumped
sharply
in
January
and
February
,
as
compared
with
those
same
months
in
1960
.
Then
March
brought
an
18
per
cent
rise
in
net
revenues
--
after
operating
costs
.
As
a
result
,
the
road's
net
revenues
in
the
12
months
ending
March
31
were
186
per
cent
of
the
annual
interest
payments
on
the
turnpike
bonds
.
That
was
up
from
173
per
cent
in
the
preceding
12
months
.
That
same
pattern
of
earnings
shows
up
on
the
Massachusetts
Turnpike
.
Operating
revenues
were
off
in
the
first
three
months
of
1961
,
but
up
for
the
12
months
ending
in
March
.
Costs
were
held
down
,
despite
a
bitter
winter
.
For
the
year
,
the
road
earned
133
per
cent
of
its
interest
costs
,
against
121
per
cent
in
the
preceding
period
.
The
road's
engineers
look
for
further
improvement
when
the
turnpike
is
extended
into
Boston
.
Slow
successes
.
Some
turnpikes
have
not
been
in
full
operation
long
enough
to
prove
what
they
can
do
.
The
187-mile
Illinois
State
Toll
Highway
,
for
example
,
was
not
opened
over
its
entire
length
until
December
,
1958
.
In
the
12
months
ended
in
February
,
1960
,
the
highway
earned
enough
to
cover
64
per
cent
of
its
interest
load
--
with
the
remainder
paid
out
of
initial
reserves
.
In
the
12
months
ended
in
February
,
1961
,
this
highway
earned
93
per
cent
of
its
interest
.
That
improvement
is
continuing
.
In
the
first
two
months
of
1961
,
earnings
of
the
Illinois
highway
available
for
interest
payments
were
up
55
per
cent
from
early
1960
.
Success
,
for
many
turnpikes
,
has
come
hard
.
Traffic
frequently
has
failed
to
measure
up
to
engineers'
rosy
estimates
.
In
these
cases
,
the
turnpike
managements
have
had
to
turn
to
toll-rate
increases
,
or
to
costly
improvements
such
as
extensions
or
better
connections
with
other
highways
.
Many
rate
increases
already
have
been
put
into
effect
.
Higher
tolls
are
planned
for
July
1
,
1961
,
on
the
Richmond-Petersburg
,
Va.
,
Turnpike
,
and
proposals
for
increased
tolls
on
the
Texas
Turnpike
are
under
study
.
Easier
access
.
Progress
is
being
made
,
too
,
in
improving
motorists'
access
to
many
turnpikes
.
The
Kansas
Turnpike
offers
an
illustration
.
Net
earnings
of
that
road
rose
from
62
per
cent
of
interest
requirements
in
calendar
1957
to
86
per
cent
in
the
12
months
ended
Feb.
28
,
1961
.
Further
improvements
in
earnings
of
the
Kansas
Turnpike
are
expected
late
in
1961
,
with
the
opening
of
a
new
bypass
at
Wichita
,
and
still
later
when
the
turnpike
gets
downtown
connections
in
both
Kansas
City
,
Kans.
,
and
Kansas
City
,
Mo.
.
Meanwhile
,
there
appears
to
be
enough
money
in
the
road's
reserve
fund
to
cover
the
interest
deficiency
for
eight
more
years
.
For
some
roads
,
troubles
.
Investors
studying
the
toll-road
bonds
for
opportunities
find
that
not
all
roads
are
nearing
their
goals
.
Traffic
and
revenues
on
the
Chicago
Skyway
have
been
a
great
disappointment
to
planners
and
investors
alike
.
If
nothing
is
done
,
the
prospect
is
that
that
road
will
be
in
default
of
interest
in
1962
.
West
Virginia
toll
bonds
have
defaulted
in
interest
for
months
,
and
,
despite
recent
improvement
in
revenues
,
holders
of
the
bonds
are
faced
with
more
of
the
same
.
These
,
however
,
are
exceptions
.
The
typical
picture
at
this
time
is
one
of
steady
improvement
.
It's
going
to
take
time
for
investors
to
learn
how
many
of
the
toll-road
bonds
will
pay
out
in
full
.
Already
,
however
,
several
of
the
turnpikes
are
earning
enough
to
cover
interest
requirements
by
comfortable
margins
.
Many
others
are
attracting
the
traffic
needed
to
push
revenues
up
to
the
break-even
point
.
A
top
American
official
,
after
a
look
at
Europe's
factories
,
thinks
the
U.S.
is
in
a
``
very
serious
situation
''
competitively
.
Commerce
Secretary
Luther
Hodges
,
accompanied
by
a
member
of
our
staff
,
on
May
10
toured
plants
of
two
of
Italy's
biggest
companies
--
Fiat
,
the
auto
producer
,
and
Olivetti
,
maker
of
typewriters
and
calculating
machines
.
Our
staff
man
cabled
from
Turin
as
follows
--
``
Follow
Secretary
Hodges
through
the
Fiat
plant
,
and
you
learn
this
:
``
One
,
modern
equipment
--
much
of
it
supplied
under
the
Marshall
Plan
--
enables
Fiat
to
turn
out
2,100
cars
a
day
.
About
half
of
these
are
exported
.
``
Two
,
wage
costs
are
a
fraction
of
the
U.S.
costs
.
A
skilled
worker
on
the
assembly
line
,
for
example
,
earns
$37
a
week
.
``
Three
,
labor
troubles
are
infrequent
.
Fiat
officials
say
they
have
had
no
strikes
for
more
than
six
years
.
``
Said
Secretary
Hodges
:
'
It's
a
tough
combination
for
the
U.S.
to
face
.
``
Olivetti
had
a
special
interest
for
Hodges
.
Olivetti
took
over
Underwood
,
the
U.S.
typewriter
maker
,
in
late
1959
.
Within
a
year
,
without
reducing
wages
,
Underwood's
production
costs
were
cut
one
third
,
prices
were
slashed
.
The
result
has
been
that
exports
of
Underwood
products
have
doubled
.
``
The
Olivetti
plant
near
Turin
has
modern
layout
,
modern
machinery
.
The
firm
is
design-conscious
,
sales-conscious
,
advertising-conscious
.
``
Hodges
is
trying
to
get
more
foreign
business
to
go
to
the
U.S.
.
The
inflow
of
foreign
capital
would
help
the
U.S.
balance
of
payments
.
``
Hodges
predicted
:
'
I
think
we
will
see
more
foreign
firms
coming
to
the
U.S.
.
There
are
many
places
where
we
can
use
their
vigor
and
new
ideas
'
''
.
Foreign
competition
has
become
so
severe
in
certain
textiles
that
Washington
is
exploring
new
ways
of
handling
competitive
imports
.
The
recently
unveiled
Kennedy
moves
to
control
the
international
textile
market
can
be
significant
for
American
businessmen
in
many
lines
.
Important
aspects
of
the
Kennedy
textile
plans
are
these
:
An
international
conference
of
the
big
textile-importing
and
textile-exporting
countries
will
be
called
shortly
by
President
Kennedy
.
Chief
aims
of
the
proposed
conference
are
worth
noting
.
The
U.S.
will
try
to
get
agreement
among
the
industrialized
countries
to
take
more
textile
imports
from
the
less-developed
countries
over
the
years
.
Point
is
that
developing
countries
often
build
up
a
textile
industry
first
,
need
encouragement
to
get
on
their
feet
.
If
they
have
trouble
exporting
,
international
bill
for
their
support
will
grow
larger
than
it
otherwise
would
.
Idea
is
to
let
these
countries
earn
their
way
as
much
as
possible
.
At
the
same
time
,
another
purpose
of
the
conference
will
be
to
get
certain
low-wage
countries
to
control
textile
exports
--
especially
dumping
of
specific
products
--
to
high-wage
textile-producing
countries
.
Japan
,
since
1957
,
has
been
``
voluntarily
''
curbing
exports
of
textiles
to
the
U.S.
.
Hong
Kong
,
India
and
Pakistan
have
been
limiting
exports
of
certain
types
of
textiles
to
Britain
for
several
years
under
the
``
Lancashire
Pact
''
.
None
of
these
countries
is
happy
with
these
arrangements
.
The
Japanese
want
to
increase
exports
to
the
U.S.
While
they
have
been
curbing
shipments
,
they
have
watched
Hong
Kong
step
in
and
capture
an
expanding
share
of
the
big
U.S.
market
.
Hong
Kong
interests
loudly
protest
limiting
their
exports
to
Britain
,
while
Spanish
and
Portuguese
textiles
pour
into
British
market
unrestrictedly
.
The
Indians
and
Pakistanis
are
chafing
under
similar
restrictions
on
the
British
market
for
similar
reasons
.
The
Kennedy
hope
is
that
,
at
the
conference
or
through
bilateral
talks
,
the
low-wage
textile-producing
countries
in
Asia
and
Europe
will
see
that
``
dumping
''
practices
cause
friction
all
around
and
may
result
in
import
quotas
.
Gradual
,
controlled
expansion
of
the
world's
textile
trade
is
what
President
Kennedy
wants
.
This
may
point
the
way
toward
international
stabilization
agreements
in
other
products
.
It's
an
important
clue
to
Washington
thinking
.
Note
,
too
,
that
the
Kennedy
textile
plan
looks
toward
modernization
or
shrinkage
of
the
U.S.
textile
industry
.
``
Get
competitive
or
get
out
''
.
In
veiled
terms
,
that's
what
the
Kennedy
Administration
is
saying
to
the
American
textile
industry
.
The
Government
will
help
in
transferring
companies
and
workers
into
new
lines
,
where
modernization
doesn't
seem
feasible
.
Special
depreciation
on
new
textile
machinery
may
be
allowed
.
Government
research
will
look
into
new
products
and
methods
.
Import
quotas
aren't
ruled
out
where
the
national
interest
is
involved
.
But
the
Kennedy
Administration
doesn't
favor
import
quotas
.
Rather
,
they
are
impressed
with
the
British
Government's
success
in
forcing
--
and
helping
--
the
British
textile
industry
to
shrink
and
to
change
over
to
other
products
.
What's
happening
in
textiles
can
be
handwriting
on
the
wall
for
other
lines
having
difficulty
competing
with
imports
from
low-wage
countries
.
Among
the
highest-paid
workers
in
the
world
are
U.S.
coal
miners
.
Yet
U.S.
coal
is
cheap
enough
to
make
foreign
steelmakers'
mouths
water
.
Steel
Company
of
Wales
,
a
British
steelmaker
,
wants
to
bring
in
Virginia
coal
,
cut
down
on
its
takings
of
Welsh
coal
in
order
to
be
able
to
compete
more
effectively
--
especially
in
foreign
markets
.
Virginia
coal
,
delivered
by
ship
in
Wales
,
will
be
about
$2.80
a
ton
cheaper
than
Welsh
coal
delivered
by
rail
from
nearby
mines
.
U.S.
coal
is
cheap
,
despite
high
wages
,
because
of
widespread
mechanization
of
mines
,
wide
coal
seams
,
attactive
rates
on
ocean
freight
.
Many
of
the
coal
seams
in
the
nationalized
British
mines
are
twisting
,
narrow
and
very
deep
.
Productivity
of
U.S.
miners
is
twice
that
of
the
British
.
Welsh
coal
miners
,
Communist-led
,
are
up
in
arms
at
the
suggestion
that
the
steel
company
bring
in
American
coal
.
They
threaten
to
strike
.
The
British
Government
will
have
to
decide
whether
to
let
U.S.
coal
in
.
The
British
coal
industry
is
unprofitable
,
has
large
coal
stocks
it
can't
sell
.
Every
library
borrower
,
or
at
least
those
whose
taste
goes
beyond
the
five-cent
fiction
rentals
,
knows
what
it
is
to
hear
the
librarian
say
apologetically
,
``
I'm
sorry
,
but
we
don't
have
that
book
.
There
wouldn't
be
much
demand
for
it
,
I'm
afraid
''
.
Behind
this
reply
,
and
its
many
variations
,
is
the
ever-present
budget
problem
all
libraries
must
face
,
from
the
largest
to
the
smallest
.
What
to
buy
out
of
the
year's
grist
of
nearly
15,000
book
titles
?
?
What
to
buy
for
adult
and
child
readers
,
for
lovers
of
fiction
and
nonfiction
,
for
a
clientele
whose
wants
are
incredibly
diversified
,
when
your
budget
is
pitifully
small
?
?
Most
library
budgets
are
hopelessly
inadequate
.
A
startlingly
high
percentage
do
not
exceed
$500
annually
,
which
includes
the
librarian's
salary
,
and
not
even
the
New
York
Public
has
enough
money
to
meet
its
needs
--
this
in
the
world's
richest
city
.
The
plight
of
a
small
community
library
is
proportionately
worse
.
Confronted
with
this
situation
,
most
libraries
either
endure
the
severe
limitations
of
their
budgets
and
do
what
they
can
with
what
they
have
,
or
else
depend
on
the
bounty
of
patrons
and
local
governments
to
supplement
their
annual
funds
.
In
some
parts
of
the
country
,
however
,
a
co-operative
movement
has
begun
to
grow
,
under
the
wing
of
state
governments
,
whereby
,
with
the
financial
help
of
the
state
,
libraries
share
their
book
resources
on
a
county-wide
or
regional
basis
.
New
York
State
has
what
is
probably
the
most
advanced
of
these
co-operative
systems
,
so
well
developed
that
it
has
become
a
model
for
others
to
follow
.
Because
it
is
so
large
a
state
,
with
marked
contrasts
in
population
density
,
the
organization
of
the
New
York
co-operative
offers
a
cross-section
of
how
the
plan
works
.
At
one
extreme
are
the
systems
of
upper
New
York
State
,
where
libraries
in
two
or
more
counties
combine
to
serve
a
large
,
sparsely
populated
area
.
At
the
other
are
organizations
like
the
newly
formed
Nassau
Library
System
,
in
a
high-density
area
,
with
ample
resources
and
a
rapidly
growing
territory
to
serve
.
Both
these
types
,
and
those
in
between
,
are
in
existence
by
reason
of
a
legislative
interest
in
libraries
that
began
at
Albany
as
early
as
1950
,
with
the
creation
by
the
legislature
of
county
library
systems
financed
by
county
governments
with
matching
funds
from
the
state
.
It
was
a
step
in
the
right
direction
,
but
it
took
an
additional
act
passed
in
1958
to
establish
fully
the
thriving
systems
of
today
.
Under
this
law
annual
grants
are
given
to
systems
in
substantial
amounts
.
An
earlier
difficulty
was
overcome
by
making
it
clear
that
individual
libraries
in
any
area
might
join
or
not
,
as
they
saw
fit
.
Some
library
boards
are
wary
of
the
plan
.
A
large
,
well-stocked
library
,
surrounded
in
a
county
by
smaller
ones
,
may
feel
that
the
demands
on
its
resources
are
likely
to
be
too
great
.
A
small
library
may
cherish
its
independence
and
established
ways
,
and
resist
joining
in
a
cooperative
movement
that
sometimes
seems
radical
to
older
members
of
the
board
.
Within
a
system
,
however
,
the
autonomy
of
each
member
library
is
preserved
.
The
local
community
maintains
responsibility
for
the
financial
support
of
its
own
library
program
,
facilities
,
and
services
,
but
wider
resources
and
additional
services
become
available
through
membership
in
a
system
.
All
services
are
given
without
cost
to
members
.
So
obvious
are
these
advantages
that
nearly
95
per
cent
of
the
population
of
New
York
State
now
has
access
to
a
system
,
and
enthusiastic
librarians
foresee
the
day
,
not
too
distant
,
when
all
the
libraries
in
the
state
will
belong
to
a
co-op
.
To
set
up
a
co-operative
library
system
,
the
law
requires
a
central
book
collection
of
100,000
nonfiction
volumes
as
the
nucleus
,
and
the
system
is
organized
around
it
.
The
collection
may
be
in
an
existing
library
,
or
it
may
be
built
up
in
a
central
collection
.
Each
system
develops
differently
,
according
to
the
area
it
serves
,
but
the
universal
goal
is
to
pool
the
resources
of
a
given
area
for
maximum
efficiency
.
The
basic
state
grant
is
thirty
cents
for
each
person
served
,
and
there
is
a
further
book
incentive
grant
that
provides
an
extra
twenty
cents
up
to
fifty
cents
per
capita
,
if
a
library
spends
a
certain
number
of
dollars
.
In
Nassau
County
,
for
example
,
the
heavily
settled
Long
Island
suburb
of
New
York
City
,
the
system
is
credited
by
the
state
with
serving
one
million
persons
,
a
figure
that
has
doubled
since
1950
.
This
system
,
by
virtue
of
its
variety
and
size
,
offers
an
inclusive
view
of
the
plan
in
operation
.
The
Nassau
system
recognizes
that
its
major
task
it
to
broaden
reference
service
,
what
with
the
constant
expansion
of
education
and
knowledge
,
and
the
pressure
of
population
growth
in
a
metropolitan
area
.
The
need
is
for
reference
works
of
a
more
specialized
nature
than
individual
libraries
,
adequate
to
satisfy
everyday
needs
,
could
afford
.
Nassau
is
currently
building
a
central
collection
of
reference
materials
in
its
Hempstead
headquarters
,
which
will
reach
its
goal
of
100,000
volumes
by
1965
.
The
major
part
of
this
collection
is
in
the
central
headquarters
building
,
and
the
remainder
is
divided
among
five
libraries
in
the
system
designated
as
subject
centers
.
Basic
reference
tools
are
the
backbone
of
the
collection
,
but
there
is
also
specialization
in
science
and
technology
,
an
indicated
weakness
in
local
libraries
.
On
microfilm
,
headquarters
also
has
a
file
of
the
New
York
Times
from
its
founding
in
1851
to
the
present
day
,
as
well
as
bound
volumes
of
important
periodicals
.
The
entire
headquarters
collection
is
available
to
the
patrons
of
all
members
on
interlibrary
loans
.
Headquarters
gets
about
100
requests
every
day
.
It
is
connected
by
teletype
with
the
State
Library
in
Albany
,
which
will
supply
any
book
to
a
system
that
the
system
itself
cannot
provide
.
The
books
are
carried
around
by
truck
in
canvas
bags
from
headquarters
to
the
other
libraries
.
Each
subject
center
library
was
chosen
because
of
its
demonstrated
strength
in
a
particular
area
,
which
headquarters
could
then
build
upon
.
East
Meadow
has
philosophy
,
psychology
,
and
religion
;
;
Freeport
houses
social
science
,
pure
science
,
and
language
;
;
history
,
biography
,
and
education
are
centered
in
Hempstead
;
;
Levittown
has
applied
science
,
business
,
and
literature
;
;
while
Hewlett-Woodmere
is
the
repository
of
art
,
music
,
and
foreign
languages
.
The
reference
coordinator
at
headquarters
also
serves
as
a
consultant
,
and
is
available
to
work
with
the
local
librarian
in
helping
to
strengthen
local
reference
service
.
This
kind
of
cooperation
is
not
wholly
new
,
of
course
.
Public
libraries
in
Nassau
County
have
been
lending
books
to
each
other
by
mail
for
a
quarter-century
,
but
the
system
enables
this
process
to
operate
on
an
organized
and
far
more
comprehensive
basis
.
Local
libraries
find
,
too
,
that
the
new
plan
saves
tax
dollars
because
books
can
be
bought
through
the
system
,
and
since
the
system
buys
in
bulk
it
is
able
to
obtain
larger
discounts
than
would
be
available
to
an
individual
library
.
The
system
passes
on
these
savings
to
its
members
.
Further
money
is
saved
through
economy
in
bookkeeping
and
clerical
detail
as
the
result
of
central
billing
.
Books
are
not
the
only
resource
of
the
system
.
Schools
and
community
groups
turn
to
the
headquarters
film
library
for
documentary
,
art
,
and
experimental
films
to
show
at
libraries
that
sponsor
local
programs
,
and
to
organizations
in
member
communities
.
The
most
recent
film
catalogue
,
available
at
each
library
,
lists
110
titles
presently
in
the
collection
,
any
of
which
may
be
borrowed
without
charge
.
This
catalogue
lists
separately
films
suitable
for
children
,
young
adults
,
or
adults
,
although
some
classics
cut
across
age
groups
,
such
as
``
Nanook
Of
The
North
''
,
``
The
Emperor's
Nightingale
''
,
and
``
The
Red
Balloon
''
.
Workshops
are
conducted
by
the
system's
audio-visual
consultant
for
the
staffs
of
member
libraries
,
teaching
them
the
effective
use
of
film
as
a
library
service
.
The
system
well
understands
that
one
of
its
primary
responsibilities
is
to
bring
children
and
books
together
;
;
consequently
an
experienced
children's
librarian
at
headquarters
conducts
a
guidance
program
designed
to
promote
well-planned
library
activities
,
cooperating
with
the
children's
librarians
in
member
libraries
by
means
of
individual
conferences
,
workshops
,
and
frequent
visits
.
Headquarters
has
also
set
up
a
central
juvenile
book-review
and
book-selection
center
,
to
provide
better
methods
of
purchasing
and
selection
.
Sample
copies
of
new
books
are
on
display
at
headquarters
,
where
librarians
may
evaluate
them
by
themselves
or
in
workshop
groups
.
Story
hours
,
pre-school
programs
,
activities
with
community
agencies
,
and
lists
of
recommended
reading
are
all
in
the
province
of
the
children's
consultant
.
Headquarters
of
the
Nassau
system
is
an
increasingly
busy
place
these
days
,
threatening
to
expand
beyond
its
boundaries
.
In
addition
to
the
interlibrary
loan
service
and
the
children's
program
,
headquarters
has
a
public
relations
director
who
seeks
to
get
wider
grassroots
support
for
quality
library
service
in
the
county
;
;
it
prepares
cooperative
displays
(
posters
,
booklists
,
brochures
,
and
other
promotional
material
)
for
use
in
member
libraries
;
;
it
maintains
a
central
exhibit
collection
to
share
displays
already
created
and
used
;
;
and
it
publishes
Sum
And
Substance
,
a
monthly
newsletter
,
which
reports
the
system's
activities
to
the
staffs
and
trustees
of
member
libraries
.
The
system
itself
is
governed
by
a
board
of
trustees
,
geographically
representing
its
membership
.
In
Nassau
,
as
in
other
systems
,
the
long-range
objective
is
to
bring
the
maximum
service
of
libraries
to
bear
on
the
schools
,
and
on
adult
education
in
general
.
Librarians
,
a
patient
breed
of
men
and
women
who
have
borne
much
with
dedication
,
can
begin
to
see
results
today
.
Library
use
is
multiplying
daily
,
and
the
bulk
of
the
newcomers
are
those
maligned
Americans
,
the
teen-agers
.
To
them
especially
the
librarians
,
with
the
help
of
co-ops
,
hope
they
will
never
have
to
say
,
``
I'm
sorry
,
we
don't
have
that
book
''
.
Today
,
more
than
ever
before
,
the
survival
of
our
free
society
depends
upon
the
citizen
who
is
both
informed
and
concerned
.
The
great
advances
made
in
recent
years
in
Communist
strength
and
in
our
own
capacity
to
destroy
require
an
educated
citizenry
in
the
Western
world
.
The
need
for
lifetime
reading
is
apparent
.
Education
must
not
be
limited
to
our
youth
but
must
be
a
continuing
process
through
our
entire
lives
,
for
it
is
only
through
knowledge
that
we
,
as
a
nation
,
can
cope
with
the
dangers
that
threaten
our
society
.
The
desire
and
ability
to
read
are
important
aspects
of
our
cultural
life
.
We
cannot
consider
ourselves
educated
if
we
do
not
read
;
;
if
we
are
not
discriminating
in
our
reading
;
;
if
we
do
not
know
how
to
use
what
we
do
read
.
We
must
not
permit
our
society
to
become
a
slave
to
the
scientific
age
,
as
might
well
happen
without
the
cultural
and
spiritual
restraint
that
comes
from
the
development
of
the
human
mind
through
wisdom
absorbed
from
the
written
word
.
A
fundamental
source
of
knowledge
in
the
world
today
is
the
book
found
in
our
libraries
.
Although
progress
has
been
made
in
America's
system
of
libraries
it
still
falls
short
of
what
is
required
if
we
are
to
maintain
the
standards
that
are
needed
for
an
informed
America
.
The
problem
grows
in
intensity
each
year
as
man's
knowledge
,
and
his
capacity
to
translate
such
knowledge
to
the
written
word
,
continue
to
expand
.
The
inadequacy
of
our
library
system
will
become
critical
unless
we
act
vigorously
to
correct
this
condition
.
There
are
,
for
example
,
approximately
25,000,000
people
in
this
country
with
no
public
library
service
and
about
50,000,000
with
inadequate
service
.
In
college
libraries
,
57
per
cent
of
the
total
number
of
books
are
owned
by
124
of
1,509
institutions
surveyed
last
year
by
the
U.S.
Office
of
Education
.
And
over
66
per
cent
of
the
elementary
schools
with
150
or
more
pupils
do
not
have
any
library
at
all
.
In
every
aspect
of
service
--
to
the
public
,
to
children
in
schools
,
to
colleges
and
universities
--
the
library
of
today
is
failing
to
render
vitally
needed
services
.
Only
public
understanding
and
support
can
provide
that
service
.
This
is
one
of
the
main
reasons
for
National
Library
Week
,
April
16-22
,
and
for
its
theme
:
``
For
a
richer
,
fuller
life
,
read
''
!
!
Assembly
session
brought
much
good
The
General
Assembly
,
which
adjourns
today
,
has
performed
in
an
atmosphere
of
crisis
and
struggle
from
the
day
it
convened
.
It
was
faced
immediately
with
a
showdown
on
the
schools
,
an
issue
which
was
met
squarely
in
conjunction
with
the
governor
with
a
decision
not
to
risk
abandoning
public
education
.
There
followed
the
historic
appropriations
and
budget
fight
,
in
which
the
General
Assembly
decided
to
tackle
executive
powers
.
The
final
decision
went
to
the
executive
but
a
way
has
been
opened
for
strengthening
budgeting
procedures
and
to
provide
legislators
information
they
need
.
Long-range
planning
of
programs
and
ways
to
finance
them
have
become
musts
if
the
state
in
the
next
few
years
is
to
avoid
crisis-to-crisis
government
.
This
session
,
for
instance
,
may
have
insured
a
financial
crisis
two
years
from
now
.
In
all
the
turmoil
,
some
good
legislation
was
passed
.
Some
other
good
bills
were
lost
in
the
shuffle
and
await
future
action
.
Certainly
all
can
applaud
passage
of
an
auto
title
law
,
the
school
bills
,
the
increase
in
teacher
pensions
,
the
ban
on
drag
racing
,
acceptance
by
the
state
of
responsibility
for
maintenance
of
state
roads
in
municipalities
at
the
same
rate
as
outside
city
limits
,
repeal
of
the
college
age
limit
law
and
the
road
maintenance
bond
issue
.
No
action
has
been
taken
,
however
,
on
such
major
problems
as
ending
the
fee
system
,
penal
reform
,
modification
of
the
county
unit
system
and
in
outright
banning
of
fireworks
sales
.
Only
a
token
start
was
made
in
attacking
the
tax
reappraisal
question
and
its
companion
issue
of
attracting
industry
to
the
state
.
The
legislature
expended
most
of
its
time
on
the
schools
and
appropriations
questions
.
Fortunately
it
spared
us
from
the
usual
spate
of
silly
resolutions
which
in
the
past
have
made
Georgia
look
like
anything
but
``
the
empire
state
of
the
South
''
.
We
congratulate
the
entire
membership
on
its
record
of
good
legislation
.
In
the
interim
between
now
and
next
year
,
we
trust
the
House
and
Senate
will
put
their
minds
to
studying
Georgia's
very
real
economic
,
fiscal
and
social
problems
and
come
up
with
answers
without
all
the
political
heroics
.
League
regularly
stands
on
the
side
of
right
The
League
of
Women
Voters
,
40
now
and
admitting
it
proudly
,
is
inviting
financial
contributions
in
the
windup
of
its
fund
drive
.
It's
a
good
use
of
money
.
These
women
whose
organization
grew
out
of
the
old
suffrage
movement
are
dedicated
to
Thomas
Jefferson's
dictum
that
one
must
cherish
the
people's
spirit
but
``
Keep
alive
their
attention
''
.
``
If
once
they
become
inattentive
to
the
public
affairs
''
,
Jefferson
said
,
``
you
and
I
,
and
Congress
and
assemblies
,
judges
and
governors
,
shall
all
become
wolves
''
.
Newspapermen
and
politicians
especially
are
aware
of
the
penetrating
attention
and
expert
analysis
the
league
gives
to
public
affairs
.
The
league
workers
search
out
the
pros
and
cons
of
the
most
complex
issues
and
make
them
available
to
the
public
.
The
harder
the
choice
,
the
more
willing
the
league
is
to
wade
in
.
And
the
league
takes
a
stand
,
with
great
regularity
,
on
the
side
of
right
.
Look
to
Coosa
Valley
for
industrial
progress
Cities
and
counties
interested
in
industrial
development
would
do
well
in
the
months
ahead
to
keep
their
eyes
peeled
toward
the
13
northwest
Georgia
counties
that
are
members
of
the
Coosa
Valley
Area
Planning
and
Development
Commission
.
Coupling
its
own
budget
of
$83,750
with
a
$30,000
state
grant
authorized
by
Gov.
Vandiver
,
the
group
expects
to
sign
a
contract
in
March
with
Georgia
Tech.
.
Then
a
full-time
planning
office
will
be
established
in
Rome
to
work
with
a
five-member
Georgia
Tech
research
staff
for
development
of
an
area
planning
and
industrial
development
program
.
The
undertaking
has
abundant
promise
.
It
recognizes
the
fact
that
what
helps
one
county
helps
its
neighbors
and
that
by
banding
together
in
an
area-wide
effort
better
results
can
be
accomplished
than
through
the
go-it-alone
approach
.
Rusk
idea
strengthens
United
States
defense
The
Rusk
belief
in
balanced
defense
,
replacing
the
Dulles
theory
of
massive
retaliation
,
removes
a
grave
danger
that
has
existed
.
The
danger
lay
not
in
believing
that
our
own
A-bombs
would
deter
Russia's
use
of
hers
;
;
that
theory
was
and
is
sound
.
The
danger
lay
in
the
American
delusion
that
nuclear
deterrence
was
enough
.
By
limiting
American
strength
too
much
to
nuclear
strength
,
this
country
limited
its
ability
to
fight
any
kind
of
war
besides
a
nuclear
war
.
This
strategy
heightened
the
possibility
that
we
would
have
a
nuclear
war
.
It
also
weakened
our
diplomatic
stance
,
because
Russia
could
easily
guess
we
did
not
desire
a
nuclear
war
except
in
the
ultimate
extremity
.
This
left
the
Soviets
plenty
of
leeway
to
start
low-grade
brushfire
aggressions
with
considerable
impunity
.
By
maintaining
the
nuclear
deterrent
,
but
gearing
American
military
forces
to
fight
conventional
wars
too
,
Secretary
of
State
Rusk
junks
bluff
and
nuclear
brinkmanship
and
builds
more
muscle
and
greater
safety
into
our
military
position
.
DeKalb
budget
shows
county
is
on
beam
DeKalb's
budget
for
1961
is
a
record
one
and
carries
with
it
the
promise
of
no
tax
increase
to
make
it
balance
.
It
includes
a
raise
in
the
county
minimum
wage
,
creation
of
several
new
jobs
at
the
executive
level
,
financing
of
beefed-up
industrial
development
efforts
,
and
increased
expenditures
for
essential
services
such
as
health
and
welfare
,
fire
protection
,
sanitation
and
road
maintenance
.
That
such
expansion
can
be
obtained
without
a
raise
in
taxes
is
due
to
growth
of
the
tax
digest
and
sound
fiscal
planning
on
the
part
of
the
board
of
commissioners
,
headed
by
Chairman
Charles
O.
Emmerich
who
is
demonstrating
that
the
public
trust
he
was
given
was
well
placed
,
and
other
county
officials
.
Somewhere
,
somebody
is
bound
to
love
us
G.
Mennen
Williams
is
learning
the
difficulties
of
diplomacy
rapidly
.
Touring
Africa
,
the
new
U.S.
Assistant
Secretary
of
State
observed
``
Africa
should
be
for
the
Africans
''
and
the
British
promptly
denounced
him
.
Then
he
arrived
in
Zanzibar
and
found
Africans
carrying
signs
saying
``
American
imperialists
,
go
home
''
.
Chin
up
,
Soapy
.
Power
company
backs
confidence
with
dollars
Confidence
in
the
state's
economic
future
is
reflected
in
the
Georgia
Power
Company's
record
construction
budget
for
this
year
.
The
firm
does
a
large
amount
of
research
and
its
forecasts
have
meaning
.
It
is
good
to
know
that
Georgia
will
continue
to
have
sufficient
electrical
power
not
only
to
meet
the
demands
of
normal
growth
but
to
encourage
a
more
rapid
rate
of
industrialization
.
Georgia's
mental
health
program
received
a
badly
needed
boost
from
the
General
Assembly
in
the
form
of
a
$1,750,000
budget
increase
for
the
Milledgeville
State
Hospital
.
Actually
it
amounts
to
$1,250,000
above
what
the
institution
already
is
receiving
,
considering
the
additional
half-million
dollars
Gov.
Vandiver
allocated
last
year
from
the
state
surplus
.
Either
way
it
sounds
like
a
sizable
hunk
of
money
and
is
.
But
exactly
how
far
it
will
go
toward
improving
conditions
is
another
question
because
there
is
so
much
that
needs
doing
.
The
practice
of
charging
employes
for
meals
whether
they
eat
at
the
hospital
or
not
should
be
abolished
.
The
work
week
of
attendants
who
are
on
duty
65
hours
and
more
per
week
should
be
reduced
.
More
attendants
,
nurses
and
doctors
should
be
hired
.
Patients
deserve
more
attention
than
they
are
getting
.
Even
with
the
increase
in
funds
for
the
next
fiscal
year
,
Georgia
will
be
spending
only
around
$3.15
per
day
per
patient
.
The
national
average
is
more
than
$4
and
that
figure
is
considered
by
experts
in
the
mental
health
field
to
be
too
low
.
Kansas
,
regarded
as
tops
in
the
nation
in
its
treatment
of
the
mentally
ill
,
spends
$9
per
day
per
patient
.
Georgia
has
made
some
reforms
,
true
.
The
intensive
treatment
program
is
working
well
.
But
in
so
many
other
areas
we
still
are
dragging
.
Considering
what
is
being
done
compared
to
what
needs
to
be
done
,
it
behooves
the
hospital
management
to
do
some
mighty
careful
planning
toward
making
the
best
possible
use
of
the
increase
granted
.
The
boost
is
helpful
but
inadequate
.
The
end
of
Trujillo
Assassination
,
even
of
a
tyrant
,
is
repulsive
to
men
of
good
conscience
.
Rafael
Trujillo
,
the
often
blood-thirsty
dictator
of
the
Dominican
Republic
for
31
years
,
perhaps
deserved
his
fate
in
an
even-handed
appraisal
of
history
.
But
whether
the
murder
of
El
Benefactor
in
Ciudad
Trujillo
means
freedom
for
the
people
of
the
Caribbean
fiefdom
is
a
question
that
cannot
now
be
answered
.
Trujillo
knew
a
great
deal
about
assassination
.
The
responsibility
for
scores
of
deaths
,
including
the
abduction
and
murder
of
Jesus
Maria
Galindez
,
a
professor
at
Columbia
University
in
New
York
,
has
been
laid
at
his
door
.
He
had
been
involved
in
countless
schemes
to
do
away
with
democratic
leaders
in
neighboring
countries
such
as
President
Romulo
Betancourt
of
Venezuela
.
It
was
a
sort
of
poetic
justice
that
at
the
time
of
his
own
demise
a
new
plot
to
overthrow
the
Venezuelan
government
,
reportedly
involving
the
use
of
Dominican
arms
by
former
Venezuelan
Dictator
Marcos
Perez
Jimenez
,
has
been
uncovered
and
quashed
.
The
recent
history
of
the
Dominican
Republic
is
an
almost
classical
study
of
the
way
in
which
even
a
professedly
benevolent
dictatorship
tends
to
become
oppressive
.
Unquestionably
Trujillo
did
some
good
things
for
his
country
:
he
improved
public
facilities
such
as
roads
and
sanitation
,
attracted
industry
and
investment
and
raised
the
standard
of
living
notably
.
But
the
price
was
the
silence
of
the
grave
for
all
criticism
or
opposition
.
El
Benefactor's
vanity
grew
with
his
personal
wealth
.
The
jails
were
filled
to
overflowing
with
political
prisoners
who
had
incurred
his
displeasure
.
He
maintained
amply
financed
lobbies
in
the
United
States
and
elsewhere
which
sycophantically
chanted
his
praise
,
and
his
influence
extended
even
to
Congress
.
Until
the
last
year
or
so
the
profession
of
friendship
with
the
United
States
had
been
an
article
of
faith
with
Trujillo
,
and
altogether
too
often
this
profession
was
accepted
here
as
evidence
of
his
good
character
.
Tardily
the
Government
here
came
to
understand
how
this
country's
own
reputation
was
tarnished
by
the
association
with
repression
.
Last
year
,
after
Trujillo
had
been
cited
for
numerous
aggressions
in
the
Caribbean
,
the
United
States
and
many
other
members
of
the
Organization
of
American
States
broke
diplomatic
relations
with
him
.
Thereupon
followed
a
demonstration
that
tyranny
knows
no
ideological
confines
.
Trujillo's
dictatorship
had
been
along
conservative
,
right-wing
lines
.
But
after
the
censure
he
and
his
propaganda
started
mouthing
Communist
slogans
.
There
was
considerable
evidence
of
a
tacit
rapprochement
with
Castro
in
Cuba
,
previously
a
bete
noire
to
Trujillo
--
thus
illustrating
the
way
in
which
totalitarianism
of
the
right
and
left
coalesces
.
What
comes
after
Trujillo
is
now
the
puzzle
.
The
Dominican
people
have
known
no
democratic
institutions
and
precious
little
freedom
for
a
generation
,
and
all
alternative
leadership
has
been
suppressed
.
Perhaps
the
army
will
be
able
to
maintain
stability
,
but
the
vacuum
of
free
institutions
creates
a
great
danger
.
The
Dominican
Republic
could
turn
toward
Communist-type
authoritarianism
as
easily
as
toward
Western
freedom
.
Such
a
twist
would
be
a
tragedy
for
the
Dominican
people
,
who
deserve
to
breathe
without
fear
.
For
that
reason
any
democratic
reform
and
effort
to
bring
genuine
representative
government
to
the
Dominican
Republic
will
need
the
greatest
sympathy
and
help
.
Start
on
rapid
transit
High-speed
buses
on
the
George
Washington
Memorial
Parkway
,
operating
between
downtown
Washington
and
Cabin
John
,
Glen
Echo
and
Brookmont
,
would
constitute
an
alluring
sample
of
what
the
new
National
Capital
Transportation
Agency
can
do
for
this
city
.
In
presenting
plans
for
such
express
buses
before
the
Montgomery
County
Council
,
the
administrator
of
the
NCTA
,
C.
Darwin
Stolzenbach
,
was
frankly
seeking
support
for
the
projects
his
agency
will
soon
be
launching
.
Such
support
should
not
be
difficult
to
come
by
if
all
the
plans
to
be
presented
by
the
NCTA
are
as
attractive
as
this
outline
of
express
buses
coming
into
the
downtown
area
.
Because
the
buses
would
not
stop
on
the
parkway
,
land
for
bus
stations
and
for
parking
areas
nearby
will
be
needed
.
The
NCTA
is
well
advised
to
seek
funds
for
this
purpose
from
the
present
session
of
Congress
.
Must
Berlin
remain
divided
?
?
The
inference
has
been
too
widely
accepted
that
because
the
Communists
have
succeeded
in
building
barricades
across
Berlin
the
free
world
must
acquiesce
in
dismemberment
of
that
living
city
.
So
far
as
the
record
is
concerned
,
the
Western
powers
have
not
acquiesced
and
should
not
do
so
.
Though
Walter
Ulbricht
,
by
grace
of
Soviet
tanks
,
may
be
head
man
in
East
Germany
,
that
does
not
give
him
any
right
to
usurp
the
government
of
East
Berlin
or
to
absorb
that
semi-city
into
the
Soviet
zone
.
The
wartime
protocol
of
September
12
,
1944
,
designated
a
special
``
Greater
Berlin
''
area
,
comprising
the
entire
city
,
to
be
under
joint
occupation
.
It
was
not
a
part
of
any
one
of
the
three
(
later
four
)
zones
for
occupation
by
Soviet
,
American
,
British
,
and
French
troops
respectively
.
After
the
Berlin
blockade
and
airlift
,
the
Council
of
Foreign
Ministers
in
1949
declared
a
purpose
``
to
mitigate
the
effects
of
the
present
administrative
division
of
Germany
and
of
Berlin
''
.
For
some
time
the
Communists
honored
the
distinction
between
the
Soviet
zone
of
Germany
and
the
Soviet
sector
of
Berlin
by
promulgating
separately
the
laws
for
the
two
areas
.
Then
they
moved
offices
of
the
East
German
puppet
government
into
East
Berlin
and
began
illegally
to
treat
it
as
the
capital
of
East
Germany
.
That
this
and
the
closing
of
the
East
Berlin-West
Berlin
border
have
not
been
accepted
by
the
Western
governments
appears
in
notes
which
Britain
,
France
,
and
the
United
States
sent
to
Moscow
after
the
latter's
gratuitous
protest
over
a
visit
of
Chancellor
Adenauer
and
other
West
German
officials
to
West
Berlin
.
The
Chancellor
had
as
much
business
there
as
Ulbricht
had
in
East
Berlin
--
and
was
certainly
less
provocative
than
the
juvenile
sound-truck
taunts
of
Gerhard
Eisler
.
The
British
and
other
replies
to
that
Moscow
note
pointed
out
efforts
of
the
Communist
authorities
``
to
integrate
East
Berlin
into
East
Germany
by
isolating
it
from
the
outside
and
attempting
to
make
it
the
capital
of
East
Germany
''
.
They
insisted
on
the
``
fundamental
fact
''
that
``
the
whole
of
Berlin
has
a
quadripartite
status
''
.
This
is
far
from
acknowledging
or
recognizing
those
efforts
as
an
accomplished
fact
.
There
remains
,
of
course
,
the
question
of
what
the
West
can
do
beyond
diplomatic
protest
to
prevent
the
illegal
efforts
from
becoming
accomplished
facts
.
One
ground
of
action
certainly
exists
when
fusillades
of
stray
shots
go
over
into
West
Berlin
as
Communist
``
vopos
''
try
to
gun
down
fleeing
unarmed
residents
.
Another
remained
when
an
American
Army
car
was
recovered
but
with
a
broken
glass
.
The
glass
may
seem
trivial
but
Communist
official
hooliganism
feeds
on
such
incidents
unless
they
are
redressed
.
Remembering
the
step-by-step
fate
of
Danzig
and
the
West
German
misgivings
about
``
salami
''
tactics
,
it
is
to
be
hoped
that
the
dispatch
of
General
Clay
to
West
Berlin
as
President
Kennedy's
representative
will
mark
a
stiffening
of
response
not
only
to
future
indignities
and
aggressions
but
also
to
some
that
have
passed
.
Prairie
National
Park
Thousands
of
buffalo
(
``
bison
''
they
will
never
be
to
the
man
on
the
street
)
grazing
like
a
mobile
brown
throw-rug
upon
the
rolling
,
dusty-green
grassland
.
A
horizon
even
and
seamless
,
binding
the
vast
sun-bleached
dome
of
sky
to
earth
.
That
picture
of
the
American
prairie
is
as
indelibly
fixed
in
the
memory
of
those
who
have
studied
the
conquest
of
the
American
continent
as
any
later
cinema
image
of
the
West
made
in
live-oak
canyons
near
Hollywood
.
For
it
was
the
millions
of
buffalo
and
prairie
chicken
and
the
endless
seas
of
grass
that
symbolized
for
a
whole
generation
of
Americans
the
abundant
supply
that
was
to
take
many
of
them
westward
when
the
Ohio
and
Mississippi
valleys
began
to
fill
.
The
National
Park
Service
now
proposes
to
preserve
an
area
in
Pottawatomie
County
,
northeast
Kansas
,
as
a
``
Prairie
National
Park
''
.
There
the
buffalo
would
roam
,
to
be
seen
as
a
tapestry
,
not
as
moth-eaten
zoo
specimens
.
Wooded
stream
valleys
in
the
folds
of
earth
would
be
saved
.
Grasslands
would
extend
,
unfenced
,
unplowed
,
unbroken
by
silo
or
barn
--
as
the
first
settlers
saw
them
.
The
Park
Service
makes
an
impressive
ecological
and
statistical
case
for
creating
this
new
park
.
American
history
should
clinch
the
case
when
Congress
is
asked
to
approve
.
Whisky
on
the
air
A
Philadelphia
distiller
is
currently
breaching
the
customary
prohibition
against
hard-liquor
advertising
on
TV
and
radio
.
Starting
with
small
stations
not
members
of
the
National
Association
of
Broadcasters
,
the
firm
apparently
is
seeking
to
break
down
the
anti-liquor
barriers
in
major-market
stations
.
Probably
the
best
answer
to
this
kind
of
entering
wedge
is
congressional
action
requiring
the
Federal
Communications
Commission
to
ban
such
advertising
through
its
licensing
power
.
The
National
Association
of
Broadcasters
code
specifically
bars
hard-liquor
commercials
.
Past
polls
of
public
opinion
show
popular
favor
for
this
policy
.
Even
the
Distilled
Spirits
Institute
has
long
had
a
specific
prohibition
.
Why
,
then
,
with
these
voluntary
barricades
and
some
state
laws
barring
liquor
ads
,
is
it
necessary
to
seek
congressional
action
?
?
Simply
because
the
subverting
action
of
firms
that
are
not
members
of
the
Distilled
Spirits
Institute
and
of
radio
and
TV
stations
that
are
not
members
of
the
NAB
tends
to
spread
.
Soon
some
members
of
the
two
industry
groups
doubtless
will
want
to
amend
their
codes
on
grounds
that
otherwise
they
will
suffer
unfairly
from
the
efforts
of
non-code
competitors
.
Although
the
false
glamour
surrounding
bourbon
or
other
whisky
commercials
is
possibly
no
more
fatuous
than
the
pseudo-sophistication
with
which
TV
soft-drinks
are
downed
or
toothpaste
applied
,
there
is
a
sad
difference
between
enticing
a
viewer
into
sipping
Oopsie-Cola
and
gulling
him
into
downing
bourbon
.
A
law
is
needed
.
New
York
:
Democrats'
choice
Registered
Democrats
in
New
York
City
this
year
have
the
opportunity
to
elect
their
party's
candidates
for
Mayor
and
other
municipal
posts
and
the
men
who
will
run
their
party
organization
.
In
the
central
contest
,
that
for
Mayor
,
they
may
have
found
some
pertinent
points
in
what
each
faction
has
said
about
the
other
.
Mayor
Robert
F.
Wagner
must
,
as
his
opponents
demand
,
assume
responsibility
for
his
performance
in
office
.
While
all
citizens
share
in
blame
for
lax
municipal
ethics
the
Wagner
regime
has
seen
serious
problems
in
the
schools
,
law
enforcement
and
fiscal
policies
.
The
Mayor
is
finding
it
awkward
to
campaign
against
his
own
record
.
State
Controller
Arthur
Levitt
,
on
the
other
hand
,
cannot
effectively
deny
that
he
has
chosen
to
be
the
candidate
of
those
party
leaders
who
as
a
rule
have
shown
livelier
interest
in
political
power
than
in
the
city's
welfare
.
They
,
too
,
have
links
with
the
city's
ills
.
Both
men
are
known
to
be
honest
and
public-spirited
.
Mayor
Wagner's
shortcomings
have
perhaps
been
more
mercilessly
exposed
than
those
of
Mr.
Levitt
who
left
an
impression
of
quiet
competence
in
his
more
protected
state
post
.
As
Mayor
,
Mr.
Levitt
might
turn
out
to
be
more
independent
than
some
of
his
leading
supporters
would
like
.
His
election
,
on
the
other
hand
,
would
unquestionably
strengthen
the
``
regulars
''
.
Mr.
Wagner
might
or
might
not
be
a
``
new
''
Mayor
in
this
third
term
,
now
that
he
is
free
of
the
pressure
of
those
party
leaders
whom
he
calls
``
bosses
''
.
These
are
,
of
course
,
the
same
people
whose
support
he
has
only
now
rejected
to
seek
the
independent
vote
.
But
his
reelection
would
strengthen
the
liberal
Democrats
and
the
labor
unions
who
back
him
.
If
this
choice
is
less
exciting
than
New
York
Democrats
may
wish
,
it
nevertheless
must
be
made
.
The
vote
still
gives
citizens
a
voice
in
the
operation
of
their
government
and
their
party
.
Little
war
,
big
test
Both
Mr.
K's
have
so
far
continued
to
speak
softly
and
carry
big
sticks
over
Laos
.
President
Kennedy
,
already
two
quiet
demands
down
,
still
refused
Thursday
to
be
drawn
into
delivering
a
public
ultimatum
to
Moscow
.
But
at
the
same
time
he
moved
his
helicopter-borne
marines
to
within
an
hour
of
the
fighting
.
And
Secretary
Rusk
,
en
route
to
Bangkok
,
doubtless
is
trying
to
make
emergency
arrangements
for
the
possible
entry
of
Australian
or
Thai
SEATO
forces
.
For
Mr.
Kennedy
,
speaking
softly
and
carrying
a
sizable
stick
is
making
the
best
of
a
bad
situation
.
The
new
President
is
in
no
position
to
start
out
his
dealings
with
Moscow
by
issuing
callable
bluffs
.
He
must
show
at
the
outset
that
he
means
exactly
what
he
says
.
In
this
case
he
has
put
the
alternatives
clearly
to
Mr.
Khrushchev
for
the
third
time
.
At
his
press
conference
Mr.
Kennedy
said
,
``
All
we
want
in
Laos
is
peace
not
war
a
truly
neutral
government
not
a
cold
war
pawn
''
.
At
the
scene
he
has
just
as
clearly
shown
his
military
strength
in
unprovocative
but
ready
position
.
Since
Laos
is
of
no
more
purely
military
value
to
Moscow
itself
than
it
is
to
Washington
,
this
approach
might
be
expected
to
head
off
Mr.
Khrushchev
for
the
moment
.
But
because
of
the
peculiar
nature
of
the
military
situation
in
Laos
,
the
Soviet
leader
must
be
tempted
to
let
things
ride
--
a
course
that
would
appear
to
cost
him
little
on
the
spot
,
but
would
bog
Washington
in
a
tactical
mess
.
As
wars
go
,
Laos
is
an
extremely
little
one
.
Casualties
have
been
running
about
a
dozen
men
a
day
.
The
hard
core
of
the
pro-Communist
rebel
force
numbers
only
some
2,000
tough
Viet
Minh
guerrilla
fighters
.
But
for
the
United
States
and
its
SEATO
allies
to
attempt
to
shore
up
a
less
tough
,
less
combat-tested
government
army
in
monsoon-shrouded
,
road-shy
,
guerrilla-th'-wisp
terrain
is
a
risk
not
savored
by
Pentagon
planners
.
But
if
anything
can
bring
home
to
Mr.
Khrushchev
the
idea
that
he
will
not
really
get
much
enjoyment
from
watching
this
Braddock-against-the-Indians
contest
,
it
will
probably
be
the
fact
that
SEATO
forces
are
ready
to
attempt
it
--
plus
the
fact
that
Moscow
has
something
to
lose
from
closing
off
disarmament
and
other
bigger
negotiations
with
Washington
.
Fortunately
both
the
Republicans
and
America's
chief
Western
allies
now
are
joined
behind
the
neutral
Laos
aim
of
the
President
.
Actually
it
would
be
more
accurate
to
say
that
the
leader
of
the
alliance
now
has
swung
fully
behind
the
British
policy
of
seeking
to
achieve
a
neutral
Laos
via
the
international
bargaining
table
.
It
is
ironic
that
Washington
is
having
to
struggle
so
for
a
concept
that
for
six
years
it
bypassed
as
unreasonable
.
The
State
Department
tacitly
rejected
the
neutral
Laos
idea
after
the
Geneva
conference
of
1954
,
and
last
year
Washington
backed
the
rightist
coup
that
ousted
neutral
Premier
Souvanna
Phouma
.
But
since
last
fall
the
United
States
has
been
moving
toward
a
pro-neutralist
position
and
now
is
ready
to
back
the
British
plan
for
a
cease-fire
patrolled
by
outside
observers
and
followed
by
a
conference
of
interested
powers
.
The
road
to
a
guaranteed-neutral
,
coup-proof
Laos
is
today
almost
as
difficult
as
warfare
on
that
nation's
terrain
.
But
for
the
safety
of
Southeast
Asia
,
and
for
the
sake
of
the
Laotian
people
--
who
would
not
be
well-ruled
by
either
militant
minority
now
engaged
in
the
fighting
--
this
last
big
effort
to
seal
that
country
from
the
cold
war
had
to
be
made
.
The
world
awaits
Mr.
Khrushchev's
choice
of
alternatives
.
A
vote
for
educational
TV
The
Senate's
overwhelming
(
64-13
)
vote
to
support
locally
controlled
educational
TV
efforts
should
be
emulated
in
the
lower
house
.
Twice
previously
the
Senate
has
approved
measures
backing
ETV
and
the
House
has
let
them
die
.
But
this
year
prospects
may
be
better
.
The
House
communications
subcommittee
is
expected
to
report
out
a
good
bill
calling
for
the
states
to
match
federal
funds
.
This
year's
Senate
measure
would
provide
each
state
and
the
District
of
Columbia
with
$1,000,000
to
be
used
in
support
of
private
,
state
,
or
municipal
ETV
efforts
.
The
funds
would
be
used
for
equipment
,
not
for
land
,
buildings
,
or
operation
.
The
relatively
few
communities
that
have
educational
stations
have
found
them
of
considerable
value
.
But
,
lacking
money
from
commercial
sponsors
,
the
stations
have
had
difficulties
meeting
expenses
or
improving
their
service
.
Other
communities
--
the
ones
to
be
aided
most
by
the
Senate
bill
--
have
had
difficulty
starting
such
stations
because
of
the
high
initial
cost
of
equipment
.
A
good
man
departs
.
Goodby
,
Mr.
Sam
.
Sam
Rayburn
was
a
good
man
,
a
good
American
,
and
,
third
,
a
good
Democrat
.
He
was
all
of
these
rolled
into
one
sturdy
figure
;
;
Mr.
Speaker
,
Mr.
Sam
,
and
Mr.
Democrat
,
at
one
and
the
same
time
.
The
House
was
his
habitat
and
there
he
flourished
,
first
as
a
young
representative
,
then
as
a
forceful
committee
chairman
,
and
finally
in
the
post
for
which
he
seemed
intended
from
birth
,
Speaker
of
the
House
,
and
second
most
powerful
man
in
Washington
.
Mr.
Rayburn
was
not
an
easy
man
to
classify
or
to
label
.
He
was
no
flaming
liberal
,
yet
the
New
Deal
,
the
Fair
Deal
and
the
New
Frontier
needed
him
.
He
was
not
a
rear-looking
conservative
,
yet
partisans
of
that
persuasion
will
miss
him
as
much
as
any
.
Two
of
the
vital
qualities
demanded
of
a
politician
by
other
politicians
are
that
he
always
keep
a
confidence
and
that
he
keep
his
word
.
Sam
Rayburn
took
unnumbered
secrets
with
him
to
the
grave
,
for
he
was
never
loquacious
,
and
his
word
,
once
given
,
was
not
subject
to
retraction
.
It
might
be
added
that
as
he
kept
his
word
so
he
expected
that
others
keep
theirs
.
The
demonstration
of
his
power
was
never
flamboyant
or
theatrical
.
His
leadership
was
not
for
audiences
.
A
growl
,
a
nod
,
was
usually
enough
.
When
it
was
not
,
one
of
the
great
dramas
of
Washington
would
be
presented
.
He
would
rise
in
the
well
of
the
House
,
his
chin
upon
his
chest
,
his
hands
gripping
the
side
of
a
desk
,
and
the
political
and
legislative
chatter
would
subside
into
silence
.
He
spoke
briefly
,
sensibly
,
to
the
point
and
without
oratorical
flourishes
.
He
made
good
,
plain
American
common
sense
and
the
House
usually
recognized
it
and
acted
upon
it
.
These
public
efforts
were
rare
because
Mr.
Rayburn
normally
did
his
counseling
,
persuading
and
educating
long
before
an
issue
reached
its
test
on
the
House
floor
.
He
expected
Democrats
to
do
their
duty
when
it
had
been
patiently
pointed
out
to
them
.
With
his
long
service
he
had
a
long
memory
,
an
excellent
thing
in
a
political
leader
.
He
was
,
of
course
,
in
the
House
for
a
very
long
time
.
There
are
only
two
men
remaining
in
Congress
who
,
with
Rayburn
,
voted
for
the
declaration
of
war
against
Germany
in
1917
.
To
almost
two
generations
of
Americans
it
must
have
seemed
as
though
the
existence
of
Mr.
Sam
coincided
with
that
of
the
House
.
And
it
was
the
House
he
loved
.
To
be
presiding
officer
of
it
was
the
end
of
his
desire
and
ambition
.
The
Senate
to
him
was
not
the
``
upper
body
''
and
he
corrected
those
who
said
he
served
``
under
''
the
president
.
He
served
``
with
''
him
.
Sound
the
roll
of
those
with
whom
he
served
and
who
preceded
him
in
death
.
Woodrow
Wilson
,
with
whom
he
began
his
years
in
Washington
,
Warren
G.
Harding
,
Calvin
Coolidge
,
FDR
,
with
whom
he
managed
a
social
revolution
.
And
those
still
with
us
,
Herbert
C.
Hoover
,
Harry
S.
Truman
,
Dwight
D.
Eisenhower
and
John
F.
Kennedy
.
He
was
a
fighter
for
those
of
his
own
party
.
Mr.
Truman
has
only
to
recall
the
``
hopeless
''
campaign
of
1948
to
remember
what
a
loyal
partisan
he
was
and
the
first
experience
of
Mr.
Kennedy
with
Congress
would
have
been
sadder
than
it
was
had
not
Mr.
Sam
been
there
.
As
it
was
,
his
absence
because
of
his
final
illness
was
a
blow
to
the
administration
.
With
Republican
presidents
,
he
fought
fair
.
He
was
his
own
man
,
not
an
automatic
obstructionist
.
He
kept
his
attacks
on
Republicanism
for
partisan
campaigns
,
but
that
is
part
of
the
game
he
was
born
to
play
.
Under
any
name
--
Mr.
Speaker
,
Mr.
Democrat
,
Mr.
Sam
--
he
was
a
good
man
.
un
off
the
Congo
track
Thirteen
Italian
airmen
who
went
to
the
Congo
to
serve
the
cause
of
peace
under
the
United
Nations
banner
have
instead
met
violent
death
at
the
hands
of
Congolese
troops
supposedly
their
friends
.
In
18
months
,
no
more
grisly
incident
has
been
reported
from
that
jungle
.
Simply
out
of
bloodlust
,
their
murderers
dismembered
the
bodies
and
tossed
the
remains
into
the
river
.
The
excuse
was
offered
for
them
that
they
had
mistaken
the
Italians
for
Belgian
mercenaries
.
In
other
words
,
atrocities
by
savages
wearing
the
uniform
of
the
central
government
might
be
condoned
,
had
the
victims
been
serving
the
cause
of
dissident
Katanga
.
Does
this
suggest
that
the
Congo
is
fit
for
nationhood
or
that
UN
is
making
any
progress
whatever
toward
its
goal
of
so
making
it
?
?
To
the
contrary
,
through
the
past
six
weeks
violence
has
been
piled
upon
violence
.
Mass
rapes
,
troop
mutinies
,
uncontrolled
looting
and
pillage
and
reckless
military
adventures
,
given
no
sanction
by
any
political
authority
,
have
become
almost
daily
occurrences
.
Yet
this
basic
condition
of
outlawry
and
anarchy
is
not
the
work
of
Katanga
.
It
happens
in
the
territory
of
the
Leopoldville
government
,
which
is
itself
a
fiction
,
demonstrably
incapable
of
governing
,
and
commanding
only
such
limited
credit
abroad
as
UN
support
gives
it
.
The
main
question
raised
by
the
incident
is
how
much
longer
will
UN
bury
its
head
in
the
sand
on
the
Congo
problem
instead
of
facing
the
bitter
fact
that
it
has
no
solution
in
present
terms
?
?
The
probable
answer
is
that
it
will
do
so
just
as
long
as
Russia
can
exercise
a
veto
in
favor
of
chaos
and
until
young
African
nations
wake
up
to
the
truth
that
out
of
false
pride
they
are
visiting
ruin
on
Central
Africa
.
Right
now
,
they
are
pushing
a
resolution
which
would
have
UN
use
its
forces
to
invade
and
subjugate
Katanga
.
That
notion
is
fantastically
wrong-headed
from
several
points
of
view
.
The
UN
army
is
too
weak
,
too
demoralized
for
the
task
.
Further
,
it
has
its
work
cut
out
stopping
anarchy
where
it
is
now
garrisoned
.
Last
,
it
makes
no
sense
to
deliver
Katanga
,
the
one
reasonably
solid
territory
,
into
the
existing
chaos
.
The
Congo
should
have
been
mandated
,
because
it
was
not
ready
for
independence
.
The
idea
was
not
even
suggested
because
political
expediency
prevailed
over
wisdom
.
It
is
perhaps
too
late
now
to
talk
of
mandate
because
it
is
inconsistent
with
what
is
termed
political
realism
.
But
if
any
realism
and
feeling
for
truth
remain
in
the
General
Assembly
,
it
is
time
for
men
of
courage
to
measure
the
magnitude
of
the
failure
and
urge
some
new
approach
.
Otherwise
,
UN
will
march
blindly
on
to
certain
defeat
.
Featherbed
reversal
A
recent
editorial
discussing
a
labor-management
agreement
reached
between
the
Southern
Pacific
Co.
and
the
Order
of
Railroad
Telegraphers
has
been
criticized
on
the
grounds
that
it
was
not
based
on
complete
information
.
The
editorial
was
based
on
a
news
association
dispatch
which
said
that
the
telegraphers
had
secured
an
agreement
whereby
they
were
guaranteed
40
hours'
pay
per
week
whether
they
worked
or
not
and
that
a
reduction
in
their
number
was
limited
to
2
per
cent
per
year
.
Our
comment
was
that
this
was
``
featherbedding
''
in
its
ultimate
form
and
that
sympathy
for
the
railroad
was
misplaced
since
it
had
entered
into
such
an
agreement
.
The
statement
was
also
made
that
undoubtedly
the
railroad
had
received
some
compensating
benefit
from
the
telegraphers
,
but
that
it
was
difficult
to
imagine
what
could
balance
a
job
for
life
.
Additional
information
supplied
to
us
discloses
that
the
railroad
gained
a
stabilized
supply
of
telegraphers
of
which
it
was
in
need
.
Also
,
normal
personnel
attrition
would
make
the
job
reduction
provision
more
or
less
academic
.
The
situation
with
regard
to
the
Southern
Pacific
was
therefore
a
special
one
and
not
necessarily
applicable
to
other
situations
in
other
industries
.
The
solution
reached
in
the
agreement
was
more
acceptable
to
the
railroad
than
that
originally
included
in
a
series
of
union
demands
.
Meditations
from
a
fallout
shelter
Time
was
when
the
house
of
delegates
of
the
American
Bar
association
leaned
to
the
common
sense
side
.
But
the
internationalists
have
taken
over
the
governing
body
of
the
bar
,
and
when
the
lads
met
in
St.
Louis
,
it
was
not
to
grumble
about
the
humidity
but
to
vote
unanimously
that
the
United
Nations
was
scarcely
less
than
wonderful
,
despite
an
imperfection
here
and
there
.
It
was
,
the
brief
writers
decided
,
``
man's
best
hope
for
a
peaceful
and
law
abiding
world
''
.
Peace
,
it's
wonderful
,
and
``
world
law
''
,
it's
wonderful
,
too
,
and
shouldn't
we
get
an
international
covenant
extending
it
into
space
,
before
the
Russians
put
some
claim
jumper
on
the
moon
?
?
Meanwhile
,
in
Moscow
,
Khrushchev
was
adding
his
bit
to
the
march
of
world
law
by
promising
to
build
a
bomb
with
a
wallop
equal
to
100
million
tons
of
TNT
,
to
knock
sense
into
the
heads
of
those
backward
oafs
who
can't
see
the
justice
of
surrendering
West
Berlin
to
communism
.
A
nuclear
pacifier
of
these
dimensions
--
roughly
some
six
and
a
half
times
bigger
than
anything
the
United
States
has
triggered
experimentally
--
would
certainly
produce
a
bigger
bang
,
and
,
just
for
kicks
,
Khrushchev
might
use
it
to
propel
the
seminar
of
the
house
of
delegates
from
St.
Louis
to
the
moon
,
where
there
wouldn't
even
be
any
beer
to
drink
.
While
he
was
at
it
,
the
philosopher
of
the
Kremlin
contributed
an
additional
assist
to
the
rule
of
reason
by
bellowing
at
those
in
the
west
who
can't
appreciate
coexistence
thru
suicide
.
``
Fools
''
,
he
bayed
,
``
what
do
you
think
you
are
doing
''
?
?
The
only
response
we
can
think
of
is
the
humble
one
that
at
least
we
aren't
playing
the
marimba
with
our
shoes
in
the
United
Nations
,
but
perhaps
the
heavy
domes
in
the
house
of
delegates
can
improve
on
this
feeble
effort
.
Another
evidence
of
the
spreading
rule
of
reason
was
provided
from
Mexico
City
with
the
daily
hijacking
of
an
American
plane
by
a
demented
Algerian
with
a
gun
.
The
craft
made
the
familiar
unwelcome
flight
to
Havana
,
where
,
for
some
unknown
reason
,
Castro
rushed
to
the
airport
to
express
mortification
to
the
Colombian
foreign
minister
,
a
passenger
,
who
is
not
an
admirer
of
old
Ten
O'Clock
Shadow
.
The
plane
was
sent
back
to
the
United
States
,
for
a
change
,
but
Castro
kept
the
crazy
gunman
,
who
will
prove
a
suitable
recruit
to
the
revolution
.
Less
respect
for
the
legal
conventions
was
displayed
by
Castro's
right
hand
man
,
Che
Guevara
,
who
edified
the
Inter-American
Economic
and
Social
council
meeting
in
Montevideo
by
reading
two
secret
American
documents
purloined
from
the
United
States
embassy
at
Caracas
,
Venezuela
.
The
contents
were
highly
embarrassing
to
American
spokesmen
,
who
were
on
hand
to
promise
Latin
Americans
a
20
billion
dollar
foreign
aid
millennium
.
Perhaps
the
moralities
of
world
law
are
not
advanced
by
stealing
American
diplomatic
papers
and
planes
,
but
the
Kennedy
administration
can
always
file
a
demurrer
to
the
effect
that
,
but
for
its
own
incompetence
in
protecting
American
interests
,
these
things
would
not
happen
.
The
same
can
be
said
about
the
half-hearted
Cuban
invasion
mounted
by
the
administration
last
April
,
which
,
we
trust
,
is
not
symptomatic
of
the
methods
to
be
invoked
in
holding
off
the
felonious
Khrushchev
.
Pass
the
iron
rations
,
please
,
and
light
another
candle
,
for
it's
getting
dark
down
here
and
we're
minded
to
read
a
bit
of
world
law
just
to
pass
the
time
away
.
The
customer
loses
again
.
The
board
of
suspension
of
the
Interstate
Commerce
commission
has
ordered
a
group
of
railroads
not
to
reduce
their
freight
rates
on
grain
,
as
they
had
planned
to
do
this
month
.
The
request
for
lower
rates
originated
with
the
Southern
railway
,
which
has
spent
a
good
deal
of
time
and
money
developing
a
100-ton
hopper
car
with
which
it
says
it
can
move
grain
at
about
half
what
it
costs
in
the
conventional
,
smaller
car
.
By
reducing
rates
as
much
as
60
per
cent
,
it
and
its
associated
railroads
hope
to
win
back
some
of
the
business
they
have
lost
to
truckers
and
barge
lines
.
The
board's
action
shows
what
free
enterprise
is
up
against
in
our
complex
maze
of
regulatory
laws
.
A
shock
wave
from
Africa
Word
of
Dag
Hammarskjold's
death
in
an
African
plane
crash
has
sent
a
shockwave
around
the
globe
.
As
head
of
the
United
Nations
he
was
the
symbol
of
world
peace
,
and
his
tragic
end
came
at
a
moment
when
peace
hangs
precariously
.
It
was
on
the
eve
of
a
momentous
U.N.
session
to
come
to
grips
with
cold
war
issues
.
His
firm
hand
will
be
desperately
missed
.
Mr.
Hammarskjold
was
in
Africa
on
a
mission
of
peace
.
He
had
sought
talks
with
Moise
Tshombe
,
the
secessionist
president
of
Congo's
Katanga
province
where
recent
fighting
had
been
bloody
.
He
earnestly
urged
a
cease-fire
.
The
story
of
the
fatal
crash
is
not
fully
known
.
The
U.N.-chartered
plane
which
was
flying
from
the
conference
city
of
Ndola
in
Northern
Rhodesia
had
been
riddled
with
machinegun
bullets
last
weekend
and
was
newly
repaired
.
Whether
this
,
or
overt
action
,
was
the
cause
of
the
crash
must
be
promptly
determined
.
The
death
of
Mr.
Hammarskjold
removes
the
United
Nations'
most
controversial
leader
.
He
was
controversial
because
he
was
uncompromising
for
peace
and
freedom
with
justice
.
He
courageously
defended
the
rights
of
small
nations
,
and
he
stood
his
ground
against
the
savage
attacks
of
the
Communist
bloc
.
The
Congo
,
in
whose
cause
he
died
,
was
the
scene
of
one
of
his
greatest
triumphs
.
His
policies
had
resolved
the
conflicts
that
threatened
to
ignite
the
cold
war
and
workable
solutions
were
beginning
to
take
shape
.
When
the
recent
Katangan
outbreaks
imperiled
these
solutions
Mr.
Hammarskjold
,
despite
the
danger
,
flew
to
exert
a
calming
influence
.
He
gave
his
life
for
his
beliefs
.
The
U.N.
session
scheduled
for
today
will
meet
under
the
cloud
of
his
passing
.
It
is
a
crucial
session
with
the
world
on
the
edge
of
momentous
developments
.
If
the
manner
of
his
passing
moves
the
nations
to
act
in
the
spirit
of
his
dedication
the
sore
issues
that
plague
the
world
can
yet
be
resolved
with
reason
and
justice
.
That
is
the
hope
of
mankind
.
Monument
to
togetherness
reaching
agreement
on
projects
of
value
to
the
whole
community
has
long
been
one
of
Greater
Miami's
hardest
tasks
.
Too
many
have
bogged
down
in
bickering
.
Even
when
public
bodies
arrived
at
a
consensus
,
at
least
one
dissenting
vote
has
been
usual
.
So
we
note
approvingly
a
fresh
sample
of
unanimity
.
All
nine
members
of
the
Inter-American
Center
Authority
voted
for
Goodbody
&
Company's
proposal
to
finance
the
long-awaited
trade
and
cultural
center
.
The
widely
known
financial
firm
has
60
days
to
spell
out
the
terms
of
its
contract
.
If
the
indenture
is
accepted
,
the
authority
will
proceed
to
validate
a
bond
issue
repayable
from
revenue
.
Then
Goodbody
will
hand
over
a
minimum
of
$15.5
million
for
developing
the
spacious
Graves
Tract
to
house
the
center
.
The
next
step
awaits
approval
today
by
the
Metro
commissioners
as
the
members
of
the
Dade
County
Port
Authority
.
They
allotted
$500,000
three
years
ago
to
support
Interama
until
its
own
financing
could
be
arranged
.
Less
than
half
the
sum
has
been
spent
,
since
the
Interama
board
pinched
pennies
during
that
period
of
painstaking
negotiations
.
The
balance
is
being
budgeted
for
the
coming
year
.
Unanimity
on
Interama
is
not
surprising
.
It
is
one
of
the
rare
public
ventures
here
on
which
nearly
everyone
is
agreed
.
The
City
of
Miami
recently
yielded
a
prior
claim
of
$8.5
million
on
the
Graves
Tract
to
clear
the
way
for
the
project
.
County
officials
have
cooperated
consistently
.
So
have
the
people's
elected
spokesmen
at
the
state
and
federal
levels
.
Interama
,
as
it
rises
,
will
be
a
living
monument
to
Greater
Miami's
ability
to
get
together
on
worthwhile
enterprises
.
A
short
report
and
a
good
one
progress
,
or
lack
of
it
,
toward
civil
rights
in
the
50
states
is
reported
in
an
impressive
689-page
compilation
issued
last
week
by
the
United
States
Commission
on
Civil
Rights
.
Much
happened
in
this
field
during
the
past
12
months
.
Each
state
advisory
committee
documented
its
own
activity
.
Some
accounts
are
quite
lengthy
but
Florida's
is
the
shortest
of
all
,
requiring
only
four
paragraphs
.
``
The
established
pattern
of
relative
calm
in
the
field
of
race
relations
has
continued
in
all
areas
''
,
reported
this
group
headed
by
Harold
Colee
of
Jacksonville
and
including
two
South
Floridians
,
William
D.
Singer
and
John
B.
Turner
of
Miami
.
``
No
complaints
or
charges
have
been
filed
during
the
past
year
,
either
verbally
or
written
,
from
any
individual
or
group
.
``
The
committee
continues
to
feel
that
Florida
has
progressed
in
a
sound
and
equitable
program
at
both
the
state
and
local
levels
in
its
efforts
to
review
and
assess
transition
problems
as
they
arise
from
time
to
time
in
the
entire
spectrum
of
civil
rights
''
.
Problems
have
arisen
in
this
sensitive
field
but
have
been
handled
in
most
cases
with
understanding
and
restraint
.
The
progress
reported
by
the
advisory
committee
is
real
.
While
some
think
we
move
too
fast
and
others
too
slowly
,
Florida's
record
is
a
good
one
and
stands
out
among
the
50
.
West
Germany
remains
Western
West
Germany
will
face
the
crucial
tests
that
lie
ahead
,
on
Berlin
and
unification
,
with
a
coalition
government
.
This
is
the
key
fact
emerging
from
Sunday's
national
election
.
Chancellor
Adenauer's
Christian
Democratic
Party
slipped
only
a
little
in
the
voting
but
it
was
enough
to
lose
the
absolute
Bundestag
majority
it
has
enjoyed
since
1957
.
In
order
to
form
a
new
government
it
must
deal
with
one
of
the
two
rival
parties
which
gained
strength
.
Inevitably
this
means
some
compromise
.
The
aging
chancellor
in
all
likelihood
will
be
retired
.
Both
Willy
Brandt's
Social
Democrats
,
who
gained
22
seats
in
the
new
parliament
,
and
the
Free
Democrats
,
who
picked
up
23
,
will
insist
on
that
before
they
enter
the
government
.
Moon-faced
Ludwig
Erhart
,
the
economic
expert
,
probably
will
ascend
to
the
leadership
long
denied
him
.
If
he
becomes
chancellor
,
Dr.
Erhart
would
make
few
changes
.
The
wizard
who
fashioned
West
Germany's
astonishing
industrial
rebirth
is
the
soul
of
free
enterprise
.
He
is
dedicated
to
building
the
nation's
strength
and
,
as
are
all
West
Germans
,
to
a
free
Berlin
and
to
reunion
with
captive
East
Germany
.
What
is
in
doubt
as
the
free
Germans
and
their
allies
consider
the
voting
trends
is
the
nature
of
the
coalition
that
will
result
.
If
the
party
of
Adenauer
and
Erhart
,
with
45
per
cent
of
the
vote
,
approaches
the
party
of
Willy
Brandt
,
which
won
36
per
cent
,
the
result
would
be
a
stiffening
of
the
old
resolve
.
West
Berlin's
Mayor
Brandt
vigorously
demanded
a
firmer
stand
on
the
dismemberment
of
his
city
and
won
votes
by
it
.
The
Free
Democrats
(
12
per
cent
of
the
vote
)
believe
a
nuclear
war
can
be
avoided
by
negotiating
with
the
Soviet
Union
,
and
more
dealings
with
the
Communist
bloc
.
The
question
left
by
the
election
is
whether
West
Germany
veers
slightly
toward
more
firmness
or
more
flexibility
.
It
could
go
either
way
,
since
the
gains
for
both
points
of
view
were
about
the
same
.
Regardless
of
the
decision
two
facts
are
clear
.
West
Germany
,
with
its
industrial
and
military
might
,
reaffirmed
its
democracy
and
remains
firm
with
the
free
nations
.
And
the
career
of
Konrad
Adenauer
,
who
upheld
Germany's
tradition
of
rock-like
leaders
which
Bismarck
began
,
draws
near
the
end
.
Better
ask
before
joining
Americans
are
a
nation
of
joiners
,
a
quality
which
our
friends
find
endearing
and
sometimes
amusing
.
But
it
can
be
dangerous
if
the
joiner
doesn't
want
to
make
a
spectacle
of
himself
.
For
instance
,
so-called
``
conservative
''
organizations
,
some
of
them
secret
,
are
sprouting
in
the
garden
of
joining
where
``
liberal
''
organizations
once
took
root
.
One
specific
example
is
a
secret
``
fraternity
''
which
will
``
coordinate
anti-Communist
efforts
''
.
The
principle
is
commendable
but
we
suspect
that
in
the
practice
somebody
is
going
to
get
gulled
.
According
to
The
Chicago
Tribune
News
Service
,
State
Atty.
Gen.
Stanley
Mosk
of
California
has
devised
a
series
of
questions
which
the
joiner
might
well
ask
about
any
organization
seeking
his
money
and
his
name
:
1
.
Does
it
assail
schools
and
churches
with
blanket
accusations
?
?
2
.
Does
it
attack
other
traditional
American
institutions
with
unsupportable
and
wild
charges
?
?
3
.
Does
it
put
the
label
of
un-American
or
subversive
on
everyone
with
whom
it
disagrees
politically
?
?
4
.
Does
it
attempt
to
rewrite
modern
history
by
blaming
American
statesmen
for
wars
,
Communism
,
depression
,
and
other
troubles
of
the
world
?
?
5
.
Does
it
employ
crude
pressure
tactics
with
such
means
as
anonymous
telephone
calls
and
letter
writing
campaigns
?
?
6
.
Do
its
spokesmen
seem
more
interested
in
the
amount
of
money
they
collect
than
in
the
principles
they
purport
to
advocate
?
?
In
some
instances
a
seventh
question
can
be
added
:
7
.
Does
the
organization
show
an
affinity
for
a
foreign
government
,
political
party
or
personality
in
opposition
or
preference
to
the
American
system
?
?
If
the
would-be
joiner
asks
these
questions
he
is
not
likely
to
be
duped
by
extremists
who
are
seeking
to
capitalize
on
the
confusions
and
the
patriotic
apprehensions
of
Americans
in
a
troubled
time
.
Falling
somewhere
in
a
category
between
Einstein's
theory
and
sand
fleas
--
difficult
to
see
but
undeniably
there
,
nevertheless
--
is
the
tropical
green
``
city
''
of
Islandia
,
a
string
of
offshore
islands
that
has
almost
no
residents
,
limited
access
and
an
unlimited
future
.
The
latter
is
what
concerns
us
all
.
Whatever
land
you
can
see
here
,
from
the
North
tip
end
of
Elliott
Key
looking
southward
,
belongs
to
someone
--
people
who
have
title
to
the
land
.
And
what
you
can't
see
,
the
land
underneath
the
water
,
belongs
to
someone
,
too
.
The
public
.
The
only
real
problem
is
to
devise
a
plan
whereby
the
owners
of
the
above-water
land
can
develop
their
property
without
the
public
losing
its
underwater
land
and
the
right
to
its
development
for
public
use
and
enjoyment
.
In
the
fairly
brief
but
hectic
history
of
Florida
,
the
developers
of
waterfront
land
have
too
often
wound
up
with
both
their
land
and
ours
.
In
this
instance
,
happily
,
insistence
is
being
made
that
our
share
is
protected
.
And
until
this
protection
is
at
least
as
concrete
as
,
say
,
the
row
of
hotels
that
bars
us
from
our
own
sands
at
Miami
Beach
,
those
who
represent
us
all
should
agree
to
nothing
.
Closed
doors
in
city
hall
The
reaction
of
certain
City
Council
members
to
California's
newest
anti-secrecy
laws
was
as
dismaying
as
it
was
disappointing
.
We
had
assumed
that
at
least
this
local
legislative
body
had
nothing
to
hide
,
and
,
therefore
,
had
no
objections
to
making
the
deliberations
of
its
committees
and
the
city
commissions
available
to
the
public
.
In
the
preamble
to
the
open-meeting
statutes
,
collectively
known
as
the
Brown
Act
,
the
Legislature
declares
that
``
the
public
commissions
,
boards
and
councils
and
other
public
agencies
in
this
state
exist
to
aid
in
the
conduct
of
the
people's
business
.
It
is
the
intent
of
the
law
that
their
actions
be
taken
openly
and
that
their
deliberations
be
conducted
openly
.
``
The
people
of
this
state
do
not
yield
their
sovereignty
to
the
agencies
that
serve
them
.
The
people
,
in
delegating
authority
,
do
not
give
their
public
servants
the
right
to
decide
what
is
good
for
the
people
to
know
and
what
is
not
good
for
them
to
know
.
The
full
implementation
of
these
noble
words
,
however
,
has
taken
the
efforts
of
five
sessions
of
the
Legislature
.
Since
1953
California
has
led
the
nation
in
enacting
guarantees
that
public
business
shall
be
publicly
conducted
,
but
not
until
this
year
did
the
lawmakers
in
Sacramento
plug
the
remaining
loopholes
in
the
Brown
Act
.
Despite
the
lip
service
paid
by
local
governments
,
the
anti-secrecy
statutes
have
been
continuously
subverted
by
reservations
and
rationalizations
.
When
all
else
fails
,
it
is
argued
that
open
sessions
slow
down
governmental
operations
.
We
submit
that
this
is
a
most
desirable
effect
of
the
law
--
and
one
of
its
principal
aims
.
Without
public
scrutiny
the
deliberations
of
public
agencies
would
no
doubt
be
conducted
more
speedily
.
But
the
citizens
would
,
of
course
,
never
be
sure
that
the
decisions
that
resulted
were
as
correct
as
they
were
expeditious
.
Help
when
needed
If
the
Dominican
Republic
achieves
free
,
democratic
government
,
it
will
be
due
in
large
part
to
the
U.S.
show
of
force
that
enabled
President
Balaguer
to
prevent
a
threatened
restoration
of
Trujillo
dictatorship
.
Outwardly
,
Ciudad
Trujillo
is
calm
.
None
of
the
Trujillo
family
remains
.
Mr.
Balaguer
is
in
control
,
and
opposition
leaders
have
no
further
excuse
to
suspect
his
offer
of
a
coalition
government
preliminary
to
free
elections
in
the
spring
.
Had
U.S.
warships
not
appeared
off
the
Dominican
coast
,
there
is
every
possibility
that
the
country
would
now
be
wracked
by
civil
war
.
Ultimately
either
the
Trujillos
would
have
been
returned
to
power
or
the
conflict
would
have
produced
conditions
favorable
to
a
takeover
by
Dominican
elements
responsive
to
Castro
in
Cuba
.
Within
the
Organization
of
American
States
,
there
may
be
some
criticism
of
this
unilateral
American
intervention
which
was
not
without
risk
obviously
.
But
there
was
no
complaint
from
the
Dominican
crowds
which
lined
Ciudad
Trujillo's
waterfront
shouting
,
``
Vive
Yankees
''
!
!
More
,
the
U.S.
action
was
hailed
by
a
principal
opposition
leader
,
Dr.
Juan
Bosch
,
as
having
saved
``
many
lives
and
many
troubles
in
the
near
future
''
.
Mr.
Balaguer's
troubles
are
by
no
means
over
.
He
will
need
the
help
of
all
OAS
members
to
eradicate
,
finally
,
the
forces
of
authoritarianism
,
pro-Trujillo
and
pro-Castro
alike
.
In
cooperating
toward
that
objective
,
OAS
might
move
with
the
speed
and
effectiveness
demonstrated
by
the
United
States
.
Matter
of
survival
those
watching
the
growing
rivalry
between
craft
unions
and
industrial
unions
may
recognize
all
the
pressures
that
led
to
the
big
labor
split
in
1935
.
Now
,
as
then
,
it
is
a
matter
of
jobs
.
Craft
unions
seek
work
that
industrial
unions
claim
,
such
as
factory
maintenance
.
The
issue
was
sufficiently
potent
in
1935
to
spark
secession
from
the
American
Federation
of
Labor
of
its
industrial
union
members
.
That
breach
was
healed
20
years
later
by
merger
of
the
American
Federation
of
Labor
and
the
Congress
of
Industrial
Organizations
.
Or
that's
what
it
looked
like
at
the
time
.
But
automation
and
the
increasing
complexity
of
factories
has
renewed
the
competition
for
jobs
.
Walter
Reuther
,
leader
of
the
industrial
union
faction
of
the
AFL-CIO
,
says
another
two
years
of
this
squabbling
will
be
disastrous
for
all
American
labor
.
Whether
it
could
be
as
disastrous
for
American
labor
as
,
say
,
Jimmy
Hoffa
of
the
Teamsters
,
is
a
matter
of
conjecture
.
But
the
jurisdictional
disputes
that
result
from
the
craft-industrial
rivalry
do
not
win
friends
for
labor
.
Engaged
as
it
is
in
a
battle
for
world
trade
as
a
condition
of
national
survival
,
this
country
can
have
little
patience
with
labor's
family
feuds
.
The
concept
of
labor
as
a
special
class
is
outmoded
,
and
in
the
task
confronting
America
as
bastion
of
the
free
world
,
labor
must
learn
to
put
the
national
interest
first
if
it
is
itself
to
survive
.
Deterrent
the
Army
,
Navy
and
Air
Force
,
among
others
,
may
question
Secretary
Freeman's
claim
that
the
high
estate
of
United
States
agriculture
is
the
``
strongest
deterrent
''
to
the
spread
of
communism
.
But
the
secretary
insists
that
the
success
of
the
American
farmer
is
the
``
greatest
single
source
of
strength
''
in
the
struggle
to
insure
freedom
around
the
world
.
Mr.
Freeman
said
that
in
many
of
the
countries
he
visited
on
a
recent
world
trade
trip
people
were
more
awed
by
America's
capacity
to
produce
food
surpluses
than
by
our
industrial
production
--
or
even
by
the
Soviet's
successes
in
space
.
This
shouldn't
surprise
the
secretary
;
;
American
taxpayers
have
been
impressed
by
the
surpluses
for
a
long
,
long
time
.
In
fact
,
over
the
years
,
the
American
farmer's
capacity
to
over-produce
has
cost
the
taxpayers
a
large
dollar
.
And
thus
far
,
Mr.
Freeman
has
offered
very
little
relief
.
The
1961
feed
grain
program
,
which
the
secretary
sponsored
,
has
been
declared
a
billion
dollar
fiasco
.
In
exchange
for
higher
price
supports
,
growers
pledged
reduction
in
planted
acreage
.
But
the
farmers
outsmarted
Washington
by
shortening
the
distance
between
the
rows
and
pouring
on
the
fertilizer
.
The
result
:
$1.1
billion
added
to
the
deficit
in
the
federal
budget
.
Perhaps
,
as
Mr.
Freeman
says
,
American
agriculture
may
stop
the
Communists
,
but
it
is
also
swindling
the
American
taxpayer
.
What's
wrong
at
state
A
senate
subcommittee
headed
by
Sen.
Jackson
of
Washington
has
been
going
over
the
State
Department
and
has
reached
some
predictable
conclusions
.
The
department
needs
a
clearer
``
sense
of
direction
''
at
the
top
and
it
needs
fewer
,
but
better
,
people
,
Sen.
Jackson
says
.
The
subcommittee
is
not
alone
in
questioning
the
effectiveness
of
the
department
.
President
Kennedy
has
indicated
his
dissatisfaction
with
its
performance
.
But
those
who
would
revitalize
so
complex
an
organization
must
,
first
of
all
,
overcome
the
resistance
of
layers
of
officials
wedded
to
traditional
procedures
,
suspicious
of
innovation
and
fearful
of
mistakes
.
Nor
does
Sen.
Jackson
discuss
the
delicate
situation
created
by
the
presence
in
the
White
House
of
a
corps
of
presidential
assistants
engaged
in
the
study
of
foreign
policy
.
This
tends
to
create
friction
and
confusion
and
has
not
made
it
easier
for
Secretary
Rusk
to
restore
vigor
and
initiative
among
his
subordinates
.
But
competent
observers
believe
he
is
making
progress
,
particularly
toward
what
Sen.
Jackson
lists
as
the
primary
need
--
``
a
clearer
understanding
of
where
our
vital
national
interests
lie
and
what
we
must
do
to
promote
them
''
.
The
Jackson
report
will
provide
some
of
the
political
support
Mr.
Rusk
will
need
if
he
is
to
get
rid
of
department
personnel
engaged
,
as
Sen.
Jackson
puts
it
,
``
in
work
that
does
not
really
need
doing
''
.
Mr.
Rusk
should
also
draw
comfort
from
Sen.
Jackson's
recommendation
that
congressional
methods
of
dealing
with
national
security
problems
be
improved
.
Self-criticism
is
a
rare
but
needed
commodity
in
Congress
.
Betting
men
forecasting
economic
activity
is
a
hazardous
undertaking
even
for
the
specialist
.
But
now
apparently
the
job
of
Secretary
of
Labor
requires
that
he
be
willing
to
risk
his
reputation
as
a
prognosticator
of
unemployment
trends
.
James
P.
Mitchell
,
when
he
was
the
head
of
the
department
,
promised
to
eat
his
hat
if
unemployment
didn't
drop
below
three
million
a
couple
of
years
ago
.
He
lost
,
but
settled
for
a
cake
in
the
shape
of
a
fedora
.
His
successor
,
Secretary
Goldberg
,
also
has
been
guessing
wrong
on
a
drop
in
the
unemployment
rate
which
has
been
holding
just
under
7
per
cent
for
the
last
11
months
.
No
betting
man
,
Mr.
Goldberg
says
he's
merely
``
putting
my
neck
out
again
''
by
predicting
the
rate
will
go
down
this
month
.
He
is
basing
his
guess
on
new
government
statistics
that
show
business
has
broadened
its
stride
--
a
new
record
high
in
personal
income
,
an
increase
in
housing
starts
,
a
spurt
in
retail
sales
and
a
gain
in
orders
for
durable
goods
.
Mr.
Mitchell
had
an
excuse
for
losing
--
the
steel
strike
lasted
much
longer
than
he
anticipated
.
Mr.
Goldberg
has
less
reason
for
missing
.
The
economy
seems
to
be
sailing
along
on
an
even
keel
and
the
1961
hurricane
season
and
auto
strikes
are
at
an
end
so
they
can't
be
blamed
in
November
.
The
odds
thus
appear
favorable
that
the
secretary's
neck
may
be
spared
.
Little
resistance
Cambodia's
chief
of
state
,
who
has
been
accused
of
harboring
Communist
marauders
and
otherwise
making
life
miserable
for
neighboring
South
Viet
Nam
and
Thailand
,
insists
he
would
be
very
unhappy
if
communism
established
its
power
in
Southeast
Asia
.
But
so
convinced
of
communism's
inevitable
triumph
is
Prince
Sihanouk
that
he
is
ready
to
throw
in
the
towel
.
``
I
have
to
see
the
facts
''
,
is
the
way
the
prince
puts
it
.
And
from
that
point
of
vantage
he
concedes
another
two
years
of
grace
to
nations
maintaining
a
pro-Western
posture
.
Prince
Sihanouk's
powers
of
prognostication
some
day
may
be
confirmed
but
history
is
not
likely
to
praise
the
courage
of
his
convictions
.
Bottom
sighted
Commerce
Secretary
Hodges
seems
to
have
been
cast
in
the
role
of
pacemaker
for
official
Washington's
economic
forecasters
.
Weeks
ago
he
saw
a
business
upturn
in
the
second
quarter
of
this
year
while
his
colleagues
in
the
Cabinet
were
shaking
their
heads
in
disagreement
.
Recently
Treasury
Secretary
Dillon
and
Labor
Secretary
Goldberg
fell
into
line
with
Mr.
Hodges'
appraisal
,
though
there
has
been
some
reluctance
to
do
so
at
the
White
House
.
And
now
Mr.
Hodges
has
pioneered
further
into
the
economic
unknown
with
the
announcement
that
he
thinks
business
has
stopped
sliding
and
that
it
should
start
going
upward
from
this
point
.
He
is
the
first
top
administration
officer
to
see
the
bottom
of
the
slump
.
The
secretary
based
his
assessment
on
the
upturn
in
retail
sales
.
February's
volume
was
1
per
cent
above
January's
for
the
first
pickup
since
last
October
,
although
it's
still
1.5
per
cent
off
from
February
1960
.
Corroborating
Mr.
Hodges'
figures
was
the
Federal
Reserve
Board's
report
of
the
large
sales
increase
in
the
nation's
department
stores
for
the
week
ending
March
4
.
In
Newark
,
for
example
,
this
gain
was
put
at
26
per
cent
above
the
year-earlier
level
.
Of
course
,
some
of
the
credit
for
the
sale
boost
must
be
given
to
improvement
in
the
weather
and
to
the
fact
that
Easter
comes
more
than
two
weeks
earlier
than
in
1960
.
Another
optimistic
sign
,
this
one
from
the
Labor
Department
,
was
the
report
that
the
long
rise
in
unemployment
compensation
payments
``
was
interrupted
for
the
first
time
in
the
week
ending
Feb.
25
''
.
Initial
claims
for
jobless
benefits
were
said
to
have
dropped
by
8,100
in
the
week
ending
March
4
.
Mr.
Hodges
is
so
hopeful
over
the
outlook
that
he
doesn't
think
there
will
be
any
need
of
a
cut
in
income
taxes
.
Well
,
we
can't
have
everything
.
Prosperity
for
the
whole
nation
is
certainly
preferred
to
a
tax
cut
.
In
New
Jersey
,
too
New
Jersey
folk
need
not
be
told
of
the
builder's
march
to
the
sea
,
for
in
a
single
generation
he
has
parceled
and
populated
miles
of
our
shoreline
and
presses
on
to
develop
the
few
open
spaces
that
remain
.
Now
the
Stone
Harbor
bird
sanctuary
,
31
acres
of
magic
attraction
for
exotic
herons
,
is
threatened
,
but
the
battlefront
extends
far
beyond
our
state
.
Against
the
dramatic
fight
being
waged
for
preservation
of
30
miles
of
Cape
Cod
shoreline
,
the
tiny
tract
at
Stone
Harbor
may
seem
unimportant
.
But
Interior
Secretary
Udall
warns
that
there
is
a
race
on
between
those
who
would
develop
our
few
surviving
open
shorelines
and
those
who
would
save
them
for
the
enjoyment
of
all
as
public
preserves
.
The
move
for
establishment
of
a
national
seashore
park
on
30,000
acres
of
Cape
Cod
,
from
Provincetown
to
Chatham
,
is
strengthened
by
President
Kennedy's
interest
in
that
area
.
But
preservation
of
the
natural
beauty
of
the
Cape
is
of
more
than
regional
concern
,
for
the
automobile
age
has
made
it
the
recreation
spot
of
people
from
all
over
the
country
.
By
comparison
,
Stone
Harbor
bird
sanctuary's
allies
seem
less
formidable
,
for
aside
from
the
Audubon
Society
,
they
are
mostly
the
snowy
,
common
and
cattle
egrets
and
the
Louisiana
,
green
,
little
blue
and
black-crowned
herons
who
nest
and
feed
there
.
But
there
is
hope
,
for
Conservation
Commissioner
Bontempo
has
tagged
the
sanctuary
as
the
kind
of
place
the
state
hopes
to
include
in
its
program
to
double
its
park
space
.
The
desirability
of
preserving
such
places
as
the
Cape
dunes
and
Stone
Harbor
sanctuary
becomes
more
apparent
every
year
.
Public
sentiment
for
conserving
our
rich
natural
heritage
is
growing
.
But
that
heritage
is
shrinking
even
faster
.
No
joyride
much
of
the
glamor
President
Kennedy's
Peace
Corps
may
have
held
for
some
prospective
applicants
has
been
removed
by
Sargent
Shriver
,
the
head
corpsman
.
Anybody
who
is
expecting
a
joyride
should
,
according
to
Mr.
Shriver
,
get
off
the
train
right
now
.
First
of
all
,
the
recruits
will
have
to
undergo
arduous
schooling
.
It
will
be
a
16-hour
training
day
.
Then
off
to
a
remote
place
in
an
underdeveloped
country
where
the
diet
,
culture
,
language
and
living
conditions
will
be
different
.
And
the
pay
,
of
course
,
will
be
nil
.
Despite
all
this
,
the
idea
apparently
has
captured
the
imagination
of
countless
youths
whose
parents
are
probably
more
surprised
by
the
response
than
anybody
else
.
The
study
of
the
St.
Louis
area's
economic
prospects
prepared
for
the
Construction
Industry
Joint
Conference
confirms
and
reinforces
both
the
findings
of
the
Metropolitan
St.
Louis
Survey
of
1957
and
the
easily
observed
picture
of
the
Missouri-Illinois
countryside
.
St.
Louis
sits
in
the
center
of
a
relatively
slow-growing
and
in
some
places
stagnant
mid-continent
region
.
Slackened
regional
demand
for
St.
Louis
goods
and
services
reflects
the
region's
relative
lack
of
purchasing
power
.
Not
all
St.
Louis
industries
,
of
course
,
have
a
market
area
confined
to
the
immediate
neighborhood
.
But
for
those
which
do
,
the
slow
growth
of
the
area
has
a
retarding
effect
on
the
metropolitan
core
.
The
city
has
a
stake
in
stimulating
growth
and
purchasing
power
throughout
outstate
Missouri
and
Southern
Illinois
.
Gov.
Dalton's
New
Commerce
and
Industry
Commission
is
moving
to
create
a
nine-state
regional
group
in
a
collective
effort
to
attract
new
industry
.
That
is
one
approach
.
Another
would
be
to
take
the
advice
of
Dr.
Elmer
Ellis
,
president
of
the
University
of
Missouri
,
and
provide
for
an
impartial
professional
analysis
of
Missouri's
economy
.
He
says
the
state
,
in
order
to
proceed
with
economic
development
,
must
develop
an
understanding
of
how
the
various
parts
of
its
economy
fit
together
and
dovetail
into
the
national
economy
.
The
research
center
of
the
University's
School
of
Business
and
Public
Administration
is
prepared
to
undertake
the
analysis
Dr.
Ellis
has
been
talking
about
.
He
and
Dean
John
W.
Schwada
of
the
Business
School
outlined
the
project
at
a
recent
conference
.
The
University
can
make
a
valuable
contribution
to
the
state's
economic
development
through
such
a
study
.
In
Southern
Illinois
,
the
new
federal
program
of
help
to
economically
depressed
areas
ought
to
provide
some
stimulus
to
growth
.
The
Carbondale
Industrial
Development
Corp.
has
obtained
a
$500,000
loan
to
help
defray
the
cost
of
remodeling
a
city-owned
factory
to
accommodate
production
that
will
provide
500
new
jobs
.
Carbondale
is
in
the
Herrin-Murphysboro-West
Frankfort
labor
market
,
where
unemployment
has
been
substantially
higher
than
the
national
average
.
The
Federal
program
eventually
should
have
a
favorable
impact
on
Missouri's
depressed
areas
,
and
in
the
long
run
that
will
benefit
St.
Louis
as
well
.
Politics-ridden
St.
Clair
county
in
Illinois
presents
another
piece
of
the
problem
of
metropolitan
development
.
More
industrial
acreage
lies
vacant
in
St.
Clair
county
than
in
any
other
jurisdiction
in
the
St.
Louis
area
.
The
unstable
political
situation
there
represents
one
reason
new
plants
shy
away
from
the
East
Side
.
And
then
there
is
St.
Louis
county
,
where
the
Democratic
leadership
has
shown
little
appreciation
of
the
need
for
sound
zoning
,
of
the
important
relationship
between
proper
land
use
and
economic
growth
.
St.
Louis
county
under
its
present
leadership
also
has
largely
closed
its
eyes
to
the
need
for
governmental
reform
,
and
permitted
parochial
interests
to
take
priority
over
area-wide
interests
.
Some
plant-location
specialists
take
these
signs
to
mean
St.
Louis
county
doesn't
want
industry
,
and
so
they
avoid
the
area
,
and
more
jobs
are
lost
.
Metropolitan
St.
Louis's
relatively
slow
rate
of
growth
ought
to
be
a
priority
concern
of
the
political
,
business
,
civic
and
other
leaders
on
both
sides
of
the
Mississippi
.
Without
a
great
acceleration
in
the
metropolitan
area's
economy
,
there
will
not
be
sufficient
jobs
for
the
growing
numbers
of
youngsters
,
and
St.
Louis
will
slip
into
second-class
status
.
An
excess
of
zeal
Many
of
our
very
best
friends
are
reformers
.
Still
we
must
confess
that
sometimes
some
of
them
go
too
far
.
Take
,
for
example
,
the
reformers
among
New
York
City's
Democrats
.
Having
whipped
Mr.
De
Sapio
in
the
primaries
and
thus
come
into
control
of
Tammany
Hall
,
they
have
changed
the
name
to
Chatham
Hall
.
Even
though
headquarters
actually
have
been
moved
into
the
Chatham
building
,
do
they
believe
that
they
can
make
the
new
name
stick
?
?
Granted
that
the
Tammany
name
and
the
Tammany
tiger
often
were
regarded
as
badges
of
political
shame
,
the
sachems
of
the
Hall
also
have
a
few
good
marks
to
their
credit
.
But
it
is
tradition
rather
than
the
record
which
balks
at
the
expunging
of
the
Tammany
name
.
After
all
,
it
goes
back
to
the
days
in
which
sedition
was
not
un-American
,
the
days
in
which
the
Sons
of
St.
Tammany
conspired
to
overthrow
the
government
by
force
and
violence
--
the
British
government
,
that
is
.
Further
,
do
our
reforming
friends
really
believe
that
the
cartoonists
will
consent
to
the
banishment
of
the
tiger
from
their
zoo
?
?
They
will
--
when
they
give
up
the
donkey
and
the
elephant
.
Instead
of
attempting
the
impossible
,
why
not
a
publicity
campaign
to
prove
that
all
the
tiger's
stripes
are
not
black
?
?
That
might
go
over
.
The
Faget
case
The
White
House
itself
has
taken
steps
to
remove
a
former
Batista
official
,
Col.
Mariano
Faget
,
from
his
preposterous
position
as
interrogator
of
Cuban
refugees
for
the
Immigration
Service
.
The
Faget
appointment
was
preposterous
on
several
grounds
.
The
Kennedy
Administration
had
assured
anti-Castro
Cubans
that
it
would
have
nothing
to
do
with
associates
of
Dictator
Batista
.
Using
a
Batista
man
to
screen
refugees
represented
a
total
misunderstanding
of
the
democratic
forces
which
alone
can
effectively
oppose
Castro
.
Moreover
,
Col.
Faget's
information
on
Cuba
was
too
outdated
to
be
useful
in
``
screening
''
Castro
agents
;
;
the
Colonel
fled
to
the
friendly
haven
of
the
Dominican
dictatorship
as
soon
as
Castro
seized
power
.
And
while
he
had
headed
Batista's
anti-Communist
section
,
the
Batista
regime
did
not
disturb
the
Communists
so
much
as
more
open
opponents
who
were
alleged
to
be
Communists
.
Responsibility
for
the
Faget
appointment
rests
with
Gen.
J.
M.
Swing
,
an
Eisenhower
appointee
as
head
of
the
Immigration
Service
.
Gen.
Swing
has
received
public
attention
before
this
for
abuse
of
some
of
the
prerogatives
of
his
office
.
His
official
term
expired
last
summer
.
Some
reports
say
he
was
rescued
from
timely
retirement
by
his
friend
,
Congressman
Walter
of
Pennsylvania
,
at
a
moment
when
the
Kennedy
Administration
was
diligently
searching
for
all
the
House
votes
it
could
get
.
Congressman
Walter
has
been
all-powerful
in
immigration
matters
,
but
he
has
announced
plans
to
retire
in
1962
.
At
that
point
the
Administration
will
have
little
reason
to
hang
onto
Gen.
Swing
.
The
Faget
case
was
the
kind
of
salvage
job
the
Administration
should
not
have
to
repeat
.
Mr.
Eisenhower
,
politician
As
President
,
Dwight
D.
Eisenhower
often
assumed
a
role
aloof
from
the
strife
of
partisan
politics
.
As
a
former
President
,
however
,
Mr.
Eisenhower
abandoned
this
role
to
engage
in
partisan
sniping
during
a
New
York
Republican
rally
,
and
generally
missed
his
target
.
Mr.
Eisenhower
seized
upon
the
incident
of
the
postcard
lost
by
a
Peace
Corps
girl
in
Nigeria
to
attack
the
entire
Corps
as
a
``
juvenile
experiment
''
and
to
suggest
sending
a
Corps
member
to
the
moon
.
This
was
juvenile
ridicule
.
Nowhere
did
the
speaker
recognize
the
serious
purpose
of
the
Corps
or
its
welcome
reception
abroad
.
His
words
were
the
more
ungracious
to
come
from
a
man
who
lent
his
name
to
the
Eisenhower
Exchange
Fellowships
dedicated
to
the
same
goal
of
international
understanding
.
The
former
President
blithely
ignored
recent
history
in
speaking
of
``
dollarette
''
dollars
under
Kennedy
Administration
fiscal
policies
.
It
was
the
Eisenhower
Administration
which
produced
the
largest
peacetime
deficit
.
Finally
,
Mr.
Eisenhower
found
nothing
but
confusion
in
Washington
.
This
statement
recalls
the
1959
Berlin
crisis
,
when
President
Eisenhower
first
told
reporters
that
Berlin
could
not
be
defended
with
conventional
weapons
and
then
added
that
a
nuclear
defense
was
out
of
the
picture
too
.
The
crisis
has
been
renewed
since
then
but
the
confusion
has
hardly
been
compounded
.
Ex-Presidents
,
relieved
of
accountability
for
policy
,
sometimes
seem
to
feel
free
of
accountability
for
their
words
.
Some
of
former
President
Truman's
off-the-cuff
discourses
have
been
in
that
vein
.
Nobody
can
deny
the
right
of
former
Chief
Executives
to
take
part
in
politics
,
but
the
American
people
expect
them
always
to
remember
the
obligations
of
national
leadership
and
to
treat
issues
with
a
sense
of
responsibility
.
This
is
a
matter
of
respect
for
the
Presidency
.
Mr.
Eisenhower's
New
York
speech
does
not
encourage
respect
for
that
or
for
his
elder
statesmanship
.
Queen
of
the
seas
The
Queen
Mary
has
long
been
a
symbol
of
speed
,
luxury
,
and
impeccable
British
service
on
the
high
seas
.
Reports
that
the
venerable
liner
,
which
has
been
in
service
since
1936
,
was
to
be
retired
struck
a
nostalgic
note
in
many
of
us
.
But
the
Cunard
line
,
influenced
by
unpleasant
economic
facts
and
not
sentiment
,
has
decided
to
keep
the
Queen
Mary
in
service
until
next
Spring
at
least
.
A
new
queen
,
with
the
prosaic
title
of
Q3
,
had
been
planned
for
several
years
to
replace
the
Queen
Mary
.
The
British
government
,
concerned
about
the
threat
of
unemployment
in
the
shipbuilding
industry
,
had
put
through
a
bill
to
give
Cunard
loans
and
grants
totaling
$50,400,000
toward
the
$84,000,000
cost
of
a
new
75,000-ton
passenger
liner
.
Since
1957
,
more
and
more
trans-Atlantic
passengers
have
been
crossing
by
air
.
Economy
class
fares
and
charter
flights
have
attracted
almost
all
new
passengers
to
the
airlines
.
Competition
from
other
steamship
lines
has
cut
Cunard's
share
of
sea
passengers
from
one-third
to
one-fourth
and
this
year
the
line
showed
a
marked
drop
of
profits
on
the
Atlantic
run
.
The
Cunard
line
has
under
consideration
replacing
the
Queen
Mary
with
a
ship
smaller
than
75,000
tons
.
This
would
be
cheaper
to
operate
and
could
be
used
for
cruises
during
the
lean
winter
months
.
Also
under
consideration
is
an
increased
investment
in
Cunard
Eagle
Airways
which
has
applied
to
serve
New
York
.
The
decline
of
the
Cunard
line
from
its
position
of
dominance
in
Atlantic
travel
is
a
significant
development
in
the
history
of
transportation
.
Mission
to
Viet
Nam
Gen.
Maxwell
Taylor's
statement
in
Saigon
that
he
is
``
very
much
encouraged
''
about
the
chances
of
the
pro-Western
government
of
Viet
Nam
turning
back
Communist
guerrilla
attacks
comes
close
to
an
announcement
that
he
will
not
recommend
dispatching
United
States
troops
to
bolster
the
Vietnamese
Army
.
Gen.
Taylor
will
report
to
President
Kennedy
in
a
few
days
on
the
results
of
his
visit
to
South
Viet
Nam
and
,
judging
from
some
of
his
remarks
to
reporters
in
the
Far
East
,
he
is
likely
to
urge
a
more
efficient
mobilization
of
Vietnamese
military
,
economic
,
political
and
other
resources
.
There
was
good
reason
for
Gen.
Taylor
to
make
an
inspection
trip
at
this
time
.
Communist
guerrillas
recently
have
been
reported
increasing
their
activities
and
the
great
flood
of
the
Mekong
River
has
interposed
a
new
crisis
.
South
Viet
Nam's
rice
surplus
for
next
year
--
more
than
300,000
tons
--
may
have
been
destroyed
.
The
Viet
Cong
,
the
Communist
rebels
,
may
have
lost
their
stored
grain
and
arms
factories
.
The
rebels
may
try
to
seize
what
is
left
of
the
October
harvest
when
the
floods
recede
and
the
monsoon
ends
in
November
.
Nothing
that
is
likely
to
happen
,
however
,
should
prompt
the
sending
of
United
States
soldiers
for
other
than
instructional
missions
.
The
Indochina
struggle
was
a
war
to
stay
out
of
in
1954
,
when
Gen.
Ridgway
estimated
it
would
take
a
minimum
of
10
to
15
divisions
at
the
outset
to
win
a
war
the
French
were
losing
.
It
is
a
war
to
stay
out
of
today
,
especially
in
view
of
the
fact
that
President
Ngo
Dinh
Diem
apparently
does
not
want
United
States
troops
.
He
may
want
additional
technical
help
,
and
this
should
be
forthcoming
.
South
Viet
Nam
has
received
$1,450,000,000
in
United
States
aid
since
1954
and
the
rate
of
assistance
has
been
stepped
up
since
Vice
President
Lyndon
B.
Johnson's
visit
last
May
.
Gen.
Taylor
,
the
President's
special
military
adviser
,
is
a
level-headed
officer
who
is
not
likely
to
succumb
to
propaganda
or
pressure
.
It
is
probable
that
his
recommendations
will
be
informed
and
workable
,
and
that
they
will
not
lead
to
involving
the
United
States
in
an
Asian
morass
.
Gov.
John
M.
Dalton
,
himself
a
lawyer
and
a
man
of
long
service
in
government
,
spoke
with
rich
background
and
experience
when
he
said
in
an
address
here
that
lawyers
ought
to
quit
sitting
in
the
Missouri
General
Assembly
,
or
quit
accepting
fees
from
individuals
and
corporations
who
have
controversies
with
or
axes
to
grind
with
the
government
and
who
are
retained
,
not
because
of
their
legal
talents
,
but
because
of
their
government
influence
.
The
U.N.'s
'
gravest
crisis
'
Ambassador
Stevenson
yesterday
described
the
U.N.'s
problem
of
electing
a
temporary
successor
to
the
late
Dag
Hammarskjold
as
``
the
gravest
crisis
the
institution
has
faced
''
.
Of
course
it
is
.
If
the
decision
goes
wrong
,
it
may
be
--
as
Mr.
Stevenson
fears
--
``
the
first
step
on
the
slippery
path
downhill
''
to
a
U.N.
without
operational
responsibilities
and
without
effective
meaning
.
The
integrity
of
the
office
not
merely
requires
that
the
Secretary
General
shall
be
,
as
the
Charter
puts
it
,
``
the
chief
administrative
officer
of
the
Organization
''
,
but
that
neither
he
nor
his
staff
shall
seek
or
receive
instructions
from
any
government
or
any
other
authority
``
external
to
the
Organization
''
.
In
other
words
,
the
Secretary
General
is
to
be
a
nonpartisan
,
international
servant
,
not
a
political
,
national
one
.
He
should
be
,
as
Dag
Hammarskjold
certainly
was
,
a
citizen
of
the
world
.
The
Charter
does
stipulate
that
``
due
regard
''
shall
be
paid
to
the
importance
of
recruiting
the
staff
on
``
as
wide
a
geographical
basis
as
possible
''
.
The
United
States
and
its
allies
have
had
no
objection
to
this
.
What
they
have
objected
to
is
the
attempt
of
the
Russians
to
make
use
of
the
tragedy
of
Dag
Hammarskjold's
death
to
turn
the
entire
U.N.
staff
from
the
Secretary
down
into
political
agents
of
the
respective
countries
from
which
they
come
.
The
controversy
now
revolves
mainly
around
the
number
and
geographic
origin
of
the
deputies
of
the
Secretary
General
and
,
more
particularly
,
around
the
nature
of
his
relationship
with
them
.
Although
the
United
States
and
the
U.S.S.R.
have
been
arguing
whether
there
shall
be
four
,
five
or
six
top
assistants
,
the
most
important
element
in
the
situation
is
not
the
number
of
deputies
but
the
manner
in
which
these
deputies
are
to
do
their
work
.
If
any
one
of
them
has
any
power
to
veto
the
Secretary
General's
decisions
the
nature
of
the
organization
will
have
changed
.
If
they
give
him
advice
when
he
asks
it
,
or
if
they
perform
specified
duties
under
his
direction
,
the
nature
of
the
U.
N.
will
not
of
necessity
change
.
The
Secretary
General
must
have
,
subject
to
the
constitutional
direction
of
the
Security
Council
and
the
General
Assembly
,
the
power
to
act
,
to
propose
action
and
to
organize
action
without
being
hobbled
by
advisers
and
assistants
acting
on
someone
else's
instructions
.
This
is
the
root
issue
for
which
the
United
States
should
stand
.
We
should
not
become
confused
or
let
our
public
become
confused
over
irrelevant
questions
of
number
or
even
of
geography
.
What
we
must
have
,
if
the
United
Nations
is
to
survive
,
is
as
nonpolitical
,
nonpartisan
an
organization
at
the
top
as
human
beings
can
make
it
,
subject
to
no
single
nation's
direction
and
subservient
to
no
single
nation's
ambition
.
What
the
new
charter
does
The
new
City
Charter
,
which
should
get
a
Yes
vote
as
Question
No.
1
on
Nov.
7
,
would
not
make
a
good
Mayor
out
of
a
bad
one
.
There
is
no
such
magic
in
man-made
laws
.
But
it
would
greatly
strengthen
any
Mayor's
executive
powers
,
remove
the
excuse
in
large
degree
that
he
is
a
captive
of
inaction
in
the
Board
of
Estimate
,
increase
his
budget-making
authority
both
as
to
expense
and
capital
budgets
,
and
vest
in
him
the
right
to
reorganize
city
departments
in
the
interest
of
efficiency
and
economy
.
Lawmaking
power
is
removed
from
the
Board
of
Estimate
and
made
a
partnership
responsibility
of
the
City
Council
and
the
Mayor
.
Thus
there
is
a
clearer
division
of
authority
,
administrative
and
legislative
.
The
board
is
diminished
in
both
respects
,
while
it
retains
control
over
zoning
,
franchises
,
pier
leases
,
sale
,
leasing
and
assignment
of
property
,
and
other
trusteeship
functions
.
The
board
will
be
able
to
increase
,
decrease
,
add
or
eliminate
budget
items
,
subject
to
the
Mayor's
veto
;
;
but
the
City
Council
will
now
share
fully
this
budget-altering
power
.
Overriding
of
mayoral
veto
on
budget
changes
will
require
concurrence
by
board
and
Council
,
and
a
two-thirds
vote
.
The
Controller
retains
his
essential
``
fiscal
watchdog
''
functions
;
;
his
broad
but
little
used
investigative
powers
are
confirmed
.
He
loses
now-misplaced
tax
collection
duties
,
which
go
to
the
Finance
Department
.
On
net
balance
,
in
spite
of
Controller
Gerosa's
opposition
to
the
new
Charter
as
an
invasion
of
his
office
,
the
Controller
will
have
the
opportunity
for
greater
usefulness
to
good
government
than
he
has
now
.
Borough
Presidents
,
while
retaining
membership
in
the
Board
of
Estimate
,
lose
their
housekeeping
functions
.
Highways
go
to
a
new
Department
of
Highways
,
sewers
to
the
Department
of
Public
Works
,
such
street
cleaning
as
Borough
Presidents
now
do
(
in
Queens
and
Richmond
)
to
the
Sanitation
Department
.
Some
fiscal
changes
are
important
.
The
expense
(
operating
)
budget
is
to
be
a
program
budget
,
and
red
tape
is
cut
to
allow
greater
autonomy
(
with
the
Mayor
approving
)
in
fund
transfers
within
a
department
.
The
capital
budget
,
for
construction
of
permanent
improvements
,
becomes
an
appropriating
document
instead
of
just
a
calendar
of
pious
promises
;
;
but
,
as
a
second-look
safeguard
,
each
new
project
must
undergo
a
Board
of
Estimate
public
hearing
before
construction
proceeds
.
A
road
block
to
desirable
local
or
borough
improvements
,
heretofore
dependent
on
the
pocketbook
vote
of
taxpayers
and
hence
a
drag
on
progress
,
is
removed
by
making
these
a
charge
against
the
whole
city
instead
of
an
assessment
paid
by
those
immediately
affected
.
This
will
have
a
beneficial
effect
by
expediting
public
business
;
;
it
will
also
correct
some
injustices
.
Enlargement
of
the
City
Council
and
a
new
method
of
selecting
members
will
be
discussed
tomorrow
.
Inter-american
Press
The
Inter-american
Press
Association
,
which
blankets
the
Western
Hemisphere
from
northern
Canada
to
Cape
Horn
,
is
meeting
in
New
York
City
this
week
for
the
first
time
in
eleven
years
.
The
I.
A.
P.
A.
is
a
reflection
of
the
problems
and
hopes
of
the
hemisphere
;
;
and
in
these
days
this
inevitably
means
a
concentration
on
the
effects
of
the
Cuban
revolution
.
As
the
press
in
Cuba
was
gradually
throttled
by
the
Castro
regime
,
more
and
more
Cuban
publishers
,
editors
and
correspondents
were
forced
into
exile
.
The
I.
A.
P.
A.
found
itself
driven
from
journalism
into
politics
as
it
did
its
best
to
bring
about
the
downfall
of
the
Castro
Government
and
the
return
of
the
Cuban
press
to
the
freedom
it
knew
before
Batista's
dictatorship
began
in
1952
.
Freedom
of
the
press
was
lost
in
Cuba
because
of
decades
of
corruption
and
social
imbalances
.
In
such
conditions
all
freedoms
are
lost
.
This
,
in
more
diplomatic
language
,
is
what
Adlai
Stevenson
told
the
newspaper
men
of
Latin
America
yesterday
on
behalf
of
the
United
States
Government
.
He
felt
able
to
end
on
a
note
of
hope
.
He
sees
evidence
of
fair
winds
for
the
ten-year
Alliance
for
Progress
plan
with
its
emphasis
on
social
reforms
.
No
group
can
contribute
more
to
the
success
of
the
program
than
the
editors
and
publishers
of
the
Inter-American
Press
Association
.
Meeting
in
Moscow
The
Twenty-second
Soviet
Communist
Party
Congress
opens
in
Moscow
today
in
a
situation
contrasting
sharply
with
the
script
prepared
many
months
ago
when
this
meeting
was
first
announced
.
According
to
the
original
program
,
Premier
Khrushchev
expected
the
millions
looking
toward
the
Kremlin
this
morning
to
be
filled
with
admiration
or
rage
--
depending
upon
individual
or
national
politics
--
because
of
the
``
bold
program
for
building
communism
in
our
time
''
which
the
Congress
will
adopt
.
But
far
from
being
concerned
about
whether
or
not
Russia
will
have
achieved
Utopia
by
1980
,
the
world
is
watching
Moscow
today
primarily
for
clues
as
to
whether
or
not
there
will
be
nuclear
Armageddon
in
the
immediate
future
.
The
evident
contradiction
between
the
rosy
picture
of
Russia's
progress
painted
by
the
Communist
party's
program
and
the
enormous
dangers
for
all
humanity
posed
by
Premier
Khrushchev's
Berlin
policy
has
already
led
to
speculation
abroad
that
the
program
may
be
severely
altered
.
Whether
it
is
or
not
,
the
propaganda
impact
on
the
free
world
of
the
document
scheduled
to
be
adopted
at
this
meeting
will
be
far
less
than
had
been
originally
anticipated
.
And
there
must
be
many
Soviet
citizens
who
know
what
is
going
on
and
who
realize
that
before
they
can
hope
to
enjoy
the
full
life
promised
for
1980
they
and
their
children
must
first
survive
.
This
Congress
will
see
Premier
Khrushchev
consolidating
his
power
and
laying
the
groundwork
for
an
orderly
succession
should
death
or
illness
remove
him
from
the
scene
in
the
next
few
years
.
The
widespread
purge
that
has
taken
place
the
past
twelve
months
or
so
among
Communist
leaders
in
the
provinces
gives
assurance
that
the
party
officials
who
will
dominate
the
Congress
,
and
the
Central
Committee
it
will
elect
,
will
all
have
passed
the
tightest
possible
Khrushchev
screening
,
both
for
loyalty
to
him
and
for
competence
and
performance
on
the
job
.
Dr.
Conant's
call
to
action
Dr.
James
B.
Conant
has
earned
a
nationwide
reputation
as
a
moderate
and
unemotional
school
reformer
.
His
earlier
reports
considered
the
American
public
schools
basically
sound
and
not
in
need
of
drastic
change
.
Now
,
a
close
look
at
the
schools
in
and
around
the
ten
largest
cities
,
including
New
York
,
has
shattered
this
optimism
.
Dr.
Conant
has
come
away
shocked
and
angry
.
His
new
book
,
entitled
``
Slums
And
Suburbs
''
,
calls
for
fast
and
drastic
action
to
avert
disaster
.
There
is
room
for
disagreement
concerning
some
of
Dr.
Conant's
specific
views
.
His
strong
opposition
to
the
transfer
of
Negro
children
to
schools
outside
their
own
neighborhood
,
in
the
interest
of
integration
,
will
be
attacked
by
Negro
leaders
who
have
fought
for
,
and
achieved
,
this
open
or
permissive
enrollment
.
Dr.
Conant
may
underestimate
the
psychological
importance
of
even
token
equality
.
His
suggestion
that
the
prestige
colleges
be
made
the
training
institutions
for
medical
,
law
and
graduate
schools
will
run
into
strong
opposition
from
these
colleges
themselves
--
even
though
what
he
is
recommending
is
already
taking
shape
as
a
trend
.
But
these
are
side
issues
to
a
powerful
central
theme
.
That
theme
cuts
through
hypocrisies
,
complacency
and
double-talk
.
It
labels
the
slums
,
especially
the
Negro
slums
,
as
dead-end
streets
for
hundreds
of
thousands
of
youngsters
.
The
villains
of
the
piece
are
those
who
deny
job
opportunities
to
these
youngsters
,
and
Dr.
Conant
accuses
employers
and
labor
unions
alike
.
The
facts
,
he
adds
,
are
hidden
from
public
view
by
squeamish
objections
to
calling
bad
conditions
by
their
right
name
and
by
insistence
on
token
integration
rather
than
on
real
improvement
of
the
schools
,
regardless
of
the
color
of
their
students
.
A
call
for
action
``
before
it
is
too
late
''
has
alarming
implications
when
it
comes
from
a
man
who
,
in
his
previous
reports
on
the
schools
,
cautioned
so
strongly
against
extreme
measures
.
These
warnings
must
not
be
treated
lightly
.
Dr.
Conant's
conscientious
,
selfless
efforts
deserve
the
nation's
gratitude
.
He
has
served
in
positions
of
greater
glamour
,
both
at
home
and
abroad
;
;
but
he
may
well
be
doing
his
greatest
service
with
his
straightforward
report
on
the
state
of
the
public
schools
.
And
now
--
more
junk
mail
A
fascinating
letter
has
just
reached
this
desk
from
a
correspondent
who
likes
to
receive
so-called
junk
mail
.
He
was
delighted
to
learn
that
the
Post
Office
Department
is
now
going
to
expand
this
service
to
deliver
mail
from
Representatives
in
Congress
to
their
constituents
without
the
use
of
stamps
,
names
,
addresses
or
even
zone
numbers
.
In
accordance
with
legislation
passed
at
the
last
session
of
Congress
,
each
Representative
is
authorized
to
deliver
to
the
Post
Office
in
bulk
newsletters
,
speeches
and
other
literature
to
be
dropped
in
every
letter
box
in
his
district
.
This
means
an
added
burden
to
innumerable
postmen
,
who
already
are
complaining
of
heavy
loads
and
low
pay
,
and
it
presumably
means
an
increased
postal
deficit
,
but
,
our
correspondent
writes
,
think
of
the
additional
junk
mail
each
citizen
will
now
be
privileged
to
receive
on
a
regular
basis
.
Our
creditors
do
not
forget
us
Letter
writing
is
a
dying
art
.
Occasional
letters
are
sent
by
individuals
to
one
another
and
many
are
written
by
companies
to
one
another
,
but
these
are
mostly
typewritten
.
Most
mail
these
days
consists
of
nothing
that
could
truly
be
called
a
letter
.
Old
,
tired
,
trembling
the
woman
came
to
the
cannery
.
She
had
,
she
said
,
heard
that
the
plant
was
closing
.
It
couldn't
close
,
she
said
.
She
had
raised
a
calf
,
grown
it
beef-fat
.
She
had
,
with
her
own
work-weary
hands
,
put
seeds
in
the
ground
,
watched
them
sprout
,
bud
,
blossom
,
and
get
ready
to
bear
.
She
was
ready
to
kill
the
beef
,
dress
it
out
,
and
with
vegetables
from
her
garden
was
going
to
can
soup
,
broth
,
hash
,
and
stew
against
the
winter
.
She
had
done
it
last
year
,
and
the
year
before
,
and
the
year
before
that
,
and
she
,
and
her
people
were
dependent
upon
these
cans
for
food
.
This
did
not
happen
in
counties
of
North
Georgia
,
where
the
rivers
run
and
make
rich
the
bottom
land
.
Nor
in
South
Georgia
,
where
the
summer
sun
shines
warmly
and
gives
early
life
to
the
things
growing
in
the
flat
fields
.
This
happened
in
Decatur
,
DeKalb
County
,
not
10
miles
from
the
heart
of
metropolitian
Atlanta
.
And
now
,
the
woman
,
tired
and
trembling
,
came
here
to
the
DeKalb
County
cannery
.
``
Is
it
so
the
cannery
is
going
to
close
''
?
?
O.
N.
Moss
,
61
,
tall
,
grey
as
a
possum
,
canning
plant
chief
since
1946
,
didn't
know
what
to
say
.
He
did
say
she
could
get
her
beef
and
vegetables
in
cans
this
summer
.
He
did
say
he
was
out
of
cans
,
the
No.
3's
,
but
``
I
requisitioned
22,000
''
.
He
said
he
had
No.
2's
enough
to
last
two
weeks
more
.
Threat
of
closing
the
cannery
is
a
recent
one
.
A
three-man
committee
has
recommended
to
Commission
Chairman
Charles
O.
Emmerich
that
the
DeKalb
County
cannery
be
closed
.
Reason
:
the
cannery
loses
$3,000
yearly
.
But
DeKalb
citizens
,
those
who
use
the
facilities
of
the
cannery
,
say
the
cannery
is
not
supposed
to
make
any
money
.
``
The
cannery
''
,
said
Mrs.
Lewellyn
Lundeen
,
an
active
booster
of
the
cannery
since
its
opening
during
the
war
and
rationing
years
of
1941
,
to
handle
the
``
victory
garden
''
produce
,
``
is
a
service
to
the
taxpayer
.
And
one
of
the
best
services
available
to
the
people
who
try
to
raise
and
can
meat
,
to
plant
,
grow
vegetables
and
put
them
up
.
It
helps
those
people
who
help
themselves
.
``
The
county
,
though
,
seems
more
interested
in
those
people
who
don't
even
try
,
those
who
sit
and
draw
welfare
checks
and
line
up
for
surplus
food
''
.
A
driver
of
a
dairy
truck
,
who
begins
work
at
1
a.m.
finishes
before
breakfast
,
then
goes
out
and
grows
a
garden
,
and
who
has
used
the
cannery
to
save
and
feed
a
family
of
five
,
asked
,
``
What
in
the
world
will
we
do
''
?
?
``
What
in
the
world
''
,
echoed
others
,
those
come
with
the
beans
,
potatoes
,
the
tomatoes
,
``
will
any
of
us
do
''
?
?
Moss
,
a
man
who
knows
how
much
the
cannery
helps
the
county
,
doesn't
believe
it
will
close
.
But
he
is
in
the
middle
,
an
employe
of
DeKalb
,
but
on
the
side
of
the
people
.
The
young
married
people
;
;
the
old
couples
.
The
dairy
truck
driver
;
;
the
old
woman
with
the
stew
.
``
Don't
ask
me
if
I
think
the
cannery
helps
''
,
he
said
.
``
Sir
,
I
know
the
cannery
helps
''
.
Most
of
us
would
be
willing
to
admit
that
forgiveness
comes
hard
.
When
a
person
has
thoughtlessly
or
deliberately
caused
us
pain
or
hardship
it
is
not
always
easy
to
say
,
``
Just
forget
it
''
.
There
is
one
thing
I
know
;
;
a
person
will
never
have
spiritual
poise
and
inner
peace
as
long
as
the
heart
holds
a
grudge
.
I
know
a
man
who
held
resentment
against
a
neighbor
for
more
than
three
decades
.
Several
years
ago
I
was
his
pastor
.
One
night
,
at
the
close
of
the
evening
service
,
he
came
forward
,
left
his
resentment
at
the
altar
and
gave
his
heart
to
God
.
After
almost
everyone
had
gone
he
told
me
the
simple
story
of
how
one
of
his
neighbors
had
moved
a
fence
a
few
feet
over
on
his
land
.
``
We
tried
to
settle
this
dispute
''
,
he
said
,
``
but
could
never
come
to
an
agreement
.
I
settled
it
tonight
''
,
he
continued
.
``
I
leave
this
church
with
a
feeling
that
a
great
weight
has
been
lifted
off
my
heart
,
I
have
left
my
grudge
at
the
altar
and
forgiven
my
neighbor
''
.
Forgiveness
is
the
door
through
which
a
person
must
pass
to
enter
the
Kingdom
of
God
.
You
cannot
wear
the
banner
of
God
and
at
the
same
time
harbor
envy
,
jealousy
and
grudges
in
your
heart
.
Henry
Van
Dyke
said
,
``
Forgive
and
forget
if
you
can
;
;
but
forgive
anyway
''
.
Jesus
made
three
things
clear
about
forgiveness
.
We
must
,
first
of
all
,
be
willing
to
forgive
others
before
we
can
secure
God's
forgiveness
.
``
For
if
ye
forgive
men
their
trespasses
,
your
heavenly
Father
will
also
forgive
you
:
but
if
ye
forgive
not
men
their
trespasses
,
neither
will
your
Father
forgive
--
your
trespasses
''
.
Matthew
6
:
14-15
.
It
will
do
no
good
to
seek
God's
forgiveness
until
we
have
forgiven
those
who
have
done
us
wrong
.
Then
,
Jesus
indicated
that
God's
forgiveness
is
unlimited
.
In
the
prayer
Jesus
taught
his
disciples
to
pray
we
find
these
words
,
``
Forgive
us
our
debts
''
.
When
a
person
meets
God's
requirements
for
the
experience
of
forgiveness
he
is
forgiven
.
God's
mercy
and
patience
will
last
forever
.
Forgiveness
implies
more
than
a
person
wanting
his
past
sins
covered
by
God's
love
.
It
also
implies
that
a
man
wants
his
future
to
be
free
from
the
mistakes
of
the
past
.
We
want
the
past
forgiven
,
but
at
the
same
time
we
must
be
willing
for
God
to
direct
the
future
.
Finally
,
we
must
be
willing
to
forgive
others
as
many
times
as
they
sin
against
us
.
Once
Peter
asked
,
``
How
oft
shall
my
brother
sin
against
me
,
and
I
forgive
him
?
?
Till
seven
times
?
?
Jesus
saith
unto
him
,
until
seventy
times
seven
''
.
Matthew
18
:
21-22
.
Jesus
not
only
taught
forgiveness
,
He
gave
us
an
example
of
it
on
the
cross
.
With
all
the
energy
of
his
broken
body
he
prayed
,
``
Father
,
forgive
them
,
for
they
know
not
what
they
do
''
.
Luke
23:34
.
She's
been
in
and
out
of
my
house
for
a
dozen
years
now
,
although
she's
still
a
teen-ager
who
looks
like
a
baby
,
she
is
getting
married
.
Her
mother
,
now
dead
,
was
my
good
friend
and
when
she
came
to
tell
us
about
her
plans
and
to
show
off
her
ring
I
had
a
sobering
wish
to
say
something
meaningful
to
her
,
something
her
mother
would
wish
said
.
For
a
while
there
was
such
shrill
girlish
commotion
I
couldn't
have
made
myself
heard
if
I'd
had
the
equivalent
of
the
message
to
Garcia
.
But
when
some
of
the
squeals
had
subsided
and
she
had
been
through
one
of
those
sessions
that
are
so
indispensable
to
the
young
female
--
six
girls
sprawled
on
one
bed
,
drinking
Cokes
and
giggling
--
she
came
back
to
the
kitchen
to
talk
with
me
a
minute
.
``
How
do
you
know
you
love
somebody
enough
to
get
married
''
?
?
She
asked
.
It
was
the
oldest
and
toughest
question
young
lovers
have
ever
asked
:
How
can
you
be
sure
?
?
``
Aren't
you
sure
''
?
?
I
asked
,
looking
at
her
searchingly
.
I
wanted
to
grab
her
by
the
arm
and
beg
her
to
wait
,
to
consider
,
to
know
for
certain
because
life
is
so
long
and
marriage
is
so
important
.
But
if
she
were
just
having
a
normal
case
of
pre-nuptial
jitters
such
a
question
might
frighten
her
out
of
a
really
good
marriage
.
Besides
,
in
all
honesty
,
I
don't
know
how
you
can
be
sure
.
I
don't
know
any
secret
recipe
for
certainty
.
In
the
fevered
,
intoxicating
,
breathless
state
of
being
in
love
the
usual
signposts
that
guide
you
to
lasting
and
satisfying
relationships
are
sometimes
obscured
.
I
knew
of
but
one
test
and
I
threw
it
out
to
her
for
what
it
was
worth
.
``
Does
he
ever
bore
you
''
?
?
I
asked
.
``
Bore
me
''
?
?
She
was
shocked
.
Oh
,
no-o
!
!
Why
,
he's
so
darling
and
''
``
I
mean
''
,
I
went
on
ruthlessly
,
``
when
he's
not
talking
about
you
or
himself
or
the
wonders
of
love
,
is
he
interesting
?
?
Does
he
care
about
things
that
matter
to
you
?
?
Can
you
visualize
being
stranded
with
him
on
a
desert
island
for
years
and
years
and
still
find
him
fascinating
?
?
Because
,
honey
,
I
thought
silently
,
there
are
plenty
of
desert
islands
in
every
marriage
--
long
periods
when
you're
hopelessly
stranded
,
together
.
And
if
you
bore
each
other
then
,
heaven
help
you
.
She
came
back
the
other
day
to
reassure
me
.
She
has
studied
and
observed
and
she
is
convinced
that
her
young
man
is
going
to
be
endlessly
enchanting
.
She
asked
if
I
had
other
advice
and
,
heady
with
success
,
I
rushed
it
in
,
I
hope
not
too
late
.
Be
friends
with
your
mother-in-law
.
Jokes
,
cartoons
and
cynics
to
the
contrary
,
mothers-in-law
make
good
friends
.
I
do
not
know
Dr.
Wilson
Sneed
well
.
But
I
was
deeply
moved
by
his
letter
of
resignation
as
rector
of
St.
Luke's
Church
in
Atlanta
.
It
was
the
cry
of
not
just
one
heart
;
;
it
spoke
for
many
in
the
clergy
,
I
suspect
.
The
pulpit
is
a
lonely
place
.
Who
stops
to
think
of
that
?
?
Imagine
the
searching
and
the
prayer
that
lay
behind
the
letter
the
rector
wrote
after
almost
a
decade
of
service
to
this
majestic
church
.
``
Such
a
church
needs
vigor
and
vitality
in
its
rector
and
one
man
has
only
so
much
of
these
endowments
''
,
he
told
his
members
.
A
minister
should
not
stay
``
beyond
the
time
that
his
leadership
should
benefit
''
his
church
,
he
wrote
,
``
for
he
becomes
ordinary
.
''
And
so
the
young
minister
resigned
,
to
go
and
study
and
pray
,
having
never
passed
a
day
,
he
told
his
parishioners
,
when
``
I
did
not
gain
from
you
far
more
than
I
ever
gave
to
you
''
.
His
very
honest
act
called
up
the
recent
talk
I
had
with
another
minister
,
a
modest
Methodist
,
who
said
:
``
I
feel
so
deeply
blessed
by
God
when
I
can
give
a
message
of
love
and
comfort
to
other
men
,
and
I
would
have
it
no
other
way
:
and
it
is
unworthy
to
think
of
self
.
But
oh
,
how
I
do
sometimes
need
just
a
moment
of
rest
,
and
peace
,
in
myself
''
.
A
man
who
gives
himself
to
God
and
to
the
believers
of
his
church
takes
upon
himself
a
life
of
giving
.
He
does
not
expect
to
get
great
riches
or
he
would
not
have
chosen
to
answer
the
call
to
preach
.
The
good
ones
are
not
motivated
to
seek
vainly
,
nor
are
they
disposed
to
covet
comfort
,
or
they
would
have
been
led
to
fields
that
offer
comfort
and
feed
vanity
.
Theirs
is
a
sacrificial
life
by
earthly
standards
.
Yet
we
who
lean
upon
such
a
man
and
draw
strength
from
him
and
expect
interpretation
of
the
infinite
through
him
--
we
who
readily
accept
his
sacrifice
as
our
due
,
we
of
the
congregations
are
the
first
to
tell
him
what
is
in
our
minds
instead
of
listening
to
what
is
in
his
soul
.
We
press
him
to
conform
to
our
comfortable
conceptions
and
not
to
bruise
our
satisfactions
with
his
word
,
and
God's
.
We
do
not
defeat
the
good
ones
with
this
cruelty
,
but
we
add
to
their
burden
,
while
expecting
them
to
bestow
saintliness
upon
us
in
return
for
ostentatious
church
attendance
and
a
few
bucks
a
week
,
American
cash
.
If
we
break
the
minister
to
our
bit
,
we
are
buying
back
our
own
sins
.
If
he
won't
break
,
we
add
to
the
stress
he
bears
.
And
a
minister
of
all
men
is
most
conscious
that
he
is
mere
man
--
prone
to
the
stresses
that
earthly
humanity
is
heir
to
.
We
expect
him
to
be
noble
,
and
to
make
us
so
--
yet
he
knows
,
and
tries
to
tell
us
,
how
very
humble
man
must
be
.
We
expect
bestowal
of
God's
love
through
him
.
But
how
little
love
we
give
him
.
The
church
truly
is
not
a
rest
home
for
saints
,
but
a
hospital
for
sinners
.
Yet
every
Sunday
we
sinners
go
to
that
emergency
room
to
receive
first
aid
,
and
we
leave
unmindful
that
the
man
who
ministered
to
us
is
a
human
being
who
suffers
,
too
.
Mr.
Podger
always
particularly
enjoyed
the
last
night
of
each
summer
at
Loon
Lake
.
The
narrow
fringe
of
sadness
that
ran
around
it
only
emphasized
the
pleasure
.
The
evening
was
not
always
spent
in
the
same
way
.
This
year
,
on
a
night
cool
with
the
front
of
September
moving
in
,
but
with
plenty
of
summer
still
about
,
the
Podgers
were
holding
a
neighborhood
gathering
in
the
Pod
.
The
little
cottage
was
bursting
with
people
of
all
ages
.
In
the
midst
of
it
all
,
Mr.
Podger
came
out
on
the
Pod
porch
,
alone
.
He
had
that
day
attended
a
country
auction
,
and
he
had
come
back
with
a
prize
.
The
prize
was
an
old-fashioned
,
woven
cloth
hammock
,
complete
with
cross-top
pillow
,
fringed
side
pieces
,
and
hooks
for
hanging
.
Mrs.
Podger
had
obligingly
pushed
things
around
on
the
porch
to
make
room
for
it
,
and
there
it
was
,
slung
in
a
vine-shaded
corner
,
the
night
breeze
rippling
its
fringe
with
a
slow
,
caressing
movement
.
Mr.
Podger
sat
down
in
it
,
pushed
himself
back
and
forth
in
one
or
two
slow
,
rhythmic
motions
,
and
then
swung
his
feet
up
into
it
.
He
closed
his
eyes
and
let
the
unintelligible
drift
of
voices
sweep
pleasantly
over
him
.
Suddenly
one
young
voice
rose
above
the
others
.
``
But
''
,
it
said
,
``
do
you
always
know
when
you're
happy
''
?
?
The
voice
sank
back
into
the
general
tangle
of
sound
,
but
the
question
stayed
in
Mr.
Podger's
mind
.
Here
,
in
the
cool
,
autumn-touched
evening
,
Mr.
Podger
mentally
retraced
a
day
that
had
left
him
greatly
contented
and
at
peace
.
It
had
begun
with
the
blue
jay
feather
.
Walking
along
the
lake
before
breakfast
,
Mr.
Podger
had
seen
the
feather
,
and
the
bird
that
had
lost
it
in
flight
.
The
winging
spread
of
blue
had
gone
on
,
calling
harshly
,
into
the
wood
.
The
small
shaft
of
blue
had
drifted
down
and
come
to
rest
at
his
feet
.
All
day
long
Mr.
Podger
,
who
was
a
straw-hat
man
in
the
summer
,
had
worn
the
feather
in
the
band
of
his
broad-brimmed
sunshield
.
Would
a
blue
feather
in
a
man's
hat
make
him
happy
all
day
?
?
Hardly
.
But
it
was
something
to
have
seen
it
floating
down
through
the
early
morning
sunshine
,
linking
the
blue
of
the
sky
with
the
blue
of
the
asters
by
the
lake
.
Then
,
since
the
auction
was
being
held
nearby
,
he
had
walked
to
it
.
And
there
,
on
the
way
,
had
been
the
box
turtle
,
that
slow
,
self-contained
,
world-ignoring
relic
of
pre-history
,
bent
,
for
reasons
best
known
to
itself
,
on
crossing
the
road
.
It
was
doing
very
well
,
too
,
having
reached
the
center
,
and
was
pursuing
its
way
with
commendable
singleness
of
purpose
when
Mr.
Podger
saw
hazard
approaching
in
the
shape
of
a
flashy
little
sports
car
.
Would
the
driver
see
the
turtle
?
?
Would
he
take
pains
to
avoid
it
?
?
Mr.
Podger
took
no
chances
.
Taking
off
his
hat
and
signaling
the
driver
with
it
,
Mr.
Podger
stepped
into
the
road
,
lifted
the
surprised
turtle
and
consummated
its
road-crossing
with
what
must
have
been
a
breath-taking
suddenness
.
The
turtle
immediately
withdrew
into
its
private
council
room
to
study
the
phenomenon
.
But
Mr.
Podger
and
the
driver
of
the
sports
car
waved
at
each
other
.
Here
in
the
cool
darkness
Mr.
Podger
could
still
feel
the
warmth
of
midday
,
could
still
see
the
yellow
butterflies
dancing
over
the
road
,
could
still
see
the
friendly
grin
on
the
young
,
sun-browned
face
as
the
driver
looked
back
over
his
shoulder
for
a
moment
before
the
car
streaked
out
of
sight
.
Where
was
the
driver
now
?
?
What
was
he
doing
?
?
And
the
turtle
?
?
Mr.
Podger
smiled
.
For
a
few
brief
minutes
they
had
all
been
part
of
one
little
drama
.
The
three
would
never
meet
again
,
but
for
some
reason
or
other
Mr.
Podger
was
sure
he
would
always
remember
the
incident
.
Then
there
had
been
the
auction
itself
.
Mr.
Podger
heard
again
;
;
at
will
,
the
voice
of
the
auctioneer
,
the
voices
of
the
bidders
,
and
finally
the
small
boy
who
had
been
so
interested
in
Mr.
Podger's
hammock
purchase
.
``
I
like
them
things
,
too
''
,
he
had
said
.
``
We
got
one
at
home
.
You
know
what
?
?
If
you're
lyin'
out
in
the
hammock
at
night
,
and
it
gets
kinda
cool
--
you
know
--
you
just
take
these
sides
with
the
fringe
on
--
see
--
and
wrap
'em
right
over
you
.
I
do
it
,
lots
o'
times
--
I
like
to
lie
in
a
hammock
at
night
,
by
myself
,
when
it's
all
quiet
.
The
wind
moves
it
a
little
bit
--
you
know
.
''
Mr.
Podger
had
thanked
him
gravely
,
and
now
he
made
use
of
the
advice
.
As
he
pulled
the
fringed
sides
up
and
made
himself
into
a
cocoon
,
Mr.
Podger
saw
that
thin
,
attractive
,
freckled
little
face
again
,
and
hoped
that
the
boy
,
too
,
was
lying
in
a
cool
,
fringed-wrapped
quiet
.
Alacrity
,
the
Podger
cat
,
came
by
the
hammock
,
rubbed
her
back
briefly
against
it
,
and
then
,
sure
of
a
welcome
,
hopped
up
.
She
remarked
that
she
found
the
night
wind
a
little
chilly
,
and
Mr.
Podger
took
her
inside
the
fringe
.
Soon
her
purring
rivaled
the
chirping
of
the
tree
crickets
,
rivaled
the
hum
of
voices
from
inside
the
Pod
.
Mr.
Podger
was
just
adding
this
to
his
pictures
of
the
day
when
the
screen
door
opened
and
Pam
burst
out
.
``
Dad
''
!
!
She
said
.
``
It's
getting
so
chilly
we've
lighted
a
fire
,
and
we're
going
to
tell
a
round
robin
story
--
a
nice
,
scary
one
.
We
need
you
to
start
it
.
Why
are
you
out
here
all
by
yourself
?
?
Aren't
you
happy
''
?
?
Mr.
Podger
opened
his
cocoon
and
emerged
,
tucking
Alacrity
under
his
arm
to
bring
her
in
by
the
fire
.
``
Of
course
I
am
''
,
he
said
.
``
Never
happier
in
my
life
.
I
just
came
out
here
to
know
it
''
.
Dallas
As
the
South
begins
another
school
year
,
national
and
even
world
attention
is
directed
at
the
region's
slow
progress
toward
racial
equality
in
the
public
schools
.
Desegregation
is
beginning
in
two
more
important
Southern
cities
--
Dallas
and
Atlanta
.
In
each
city
civic
and
education
leaders
have
been
working
hard
to
get
public
opinion
prepared
to
accept
the
inevitability
of
equal
treatment
.
These
programs
emphasize
the
acceptance
of
biracial
classrooms
peacefully
.
The
programs
do
not
take
sides
on
the
issue
itself
.
They
point
out
simply
that
``
it
is
the
law
of
the
land
''
.
The
two
cities
have
the
examples
of
Little
Rock
and
New
Orleans
to
hold
up
as
warnings
against
resorting
to
violence
to
try
to
stop
the
processes
of
desegregation
.
Even
better
,
they
have
the
examples
of
Nashville
and
Houston
to
hold
up
as
peaceful
and
progressive
programs
.
In
each
case
there
was
an
initial
act
of
violence
.
In
Nashville
,
a
school
was
dynamited
.
In
Houston
,
there
were
a
few
incidents
of
friction
between
whites
and
Negroes
,
none
of
which
were
serious
.
In
each
city
quick
public
reaction
and
fast
action
by
the
city
government
halted
the
threats
of
more
serious
incidents
.
The
Nashville
plan
,
incidentally
,
has
become
recognized
as
perhaps
the
most
acceptable
and
thus
the
most
practical
to
put
into
effect
in
the
troubled
South
.
It
is
a
``
stair-step
''
plan
,
in
which
desegregation
begins
in
the
first
grade
.
Each
year
another
grade
is
added
to
the
process
,
until
finally
all
12
grades
are
integrated
.
The
schedules
are
flexible
so
that
the
program
can
be
accelerated
as
the
public
becomes
more
tolerant
or
realizes
that
it
is
something
that
has
to
be
done
,
``
so
why
not
now
''
.
The
program
has
worked
well
in
both
Nashville
and
Houston
.
It
met
a
serious
rebuff
in
New
Orleans
,
where
the
two
schools
selected
for
the
first
moves
toward
integration
were
boycotted
by
white
parents
.
Another
attempt
will
be
made
this
year
in
New
Orleans
to
resume
the
program
.
Generally
,
throughout
the
South
,
there
is
a
growing
impatience
with
the
pattern
of
violence
with
which
every
step
of
desegregation
is
met
.
Perhaps
the
most
eloquent
move
toward
removal
of
racial
barriers
has
been
in
Dallas
.
During
the
summer
,
Negroes
began
quietly
patronizing
previously
segregated
restaurants
and
lunch
counters
in
downtown
retail
establishments
.
It
was
part
of
a
citywide
move
toward
full
integration
.
So
successful
has
been
this
program
,
worked
out
by
white
and
Negro
civic
leaders
,
that
further
extensions
are
expected
in
the
next
few
months
.
Hotels
,
for
example
,
are
ready
to
let
down
the
bars
.
Already
,
at
least
one
hotel
has
been
quietly
taking
reservations
on
a
nonracial
basis
.
Several
conventions
have
been
held
in
recent
months
in
hotels
on
a
nonsegregated
basis
.
This
is
a
radical
change
in
attitude
from
the
conditions
which
prevailed
several
years
ago
,
when
a
series
of
bombings
was
directed
against
Negroes
who
were
moving
into
previously
all-white
neighborhoods
of
Dallas
.
It
is
also
symptomatic
of
a
change
in
attitude
which
appears
to
be
spreading
all
across
the
South
.
Southern
whites
themselves
are
realizing
that
they
had
been
wrong
in
using
violence
to
try
to
stop
Negroes
from
claiming
equal
rights
.
They
insist
they
are
ashamed
of
such
violence
and
intimidation
as
occurred
in
Alabama
when
the
Freedom
Riders
sought
to
break
down
racial
discrimination
in
local
bus
depots
.
All
across
the
South
there
are
signs
that
racial
violence
is
finding
less
approval
among
whites
who
themselves
would
never
take
active
part
but
might
once
have
shown
a
tolerant
attitude
toward
it
.
There
are
many
causes
for
this
change
.
One
of
the
most
important
is
economic
.
Business
leaders
are
aware
now
that
they
suffer
greatly
from
any
outbreak
of
violence
.
They
are
putting
strong
pressure
on
their
police
departments
to
keep
order
.
In
the
past
these
same
Southerners
were
inclined
to
look
the
other
way
.
And
as
the
businessmen
have
begun
to
act
,
a
real
sense
of
co-operation
has
sprung
up
.
This
co-operation
has
emboldened
other
Southern
whites
to
add
their
voices
to
demands
for
peaceable
accommodation
.
They
realize
that
by
acting
in
concert
,
rather
than
individually
,
they
will
not
be
picked
out
as
objects
of
retaliation
--
economic
and
otherwise
.
Since
moving
from
a
Chicago
suburb
to
Southern
California
a
few
months
ago
,
I've
been
introduced
to
a
new
game
called
Lanesmanship
.
Played
mostly
on
the
freeways
around
Los
Angeles
,
it
goes
like
this
:
A
driver
cruising
easily
at
70
m.p.h.
in
Lane
A
of
a
four-lane
freeway
spies
an
incipient
traffic
jam
ahead
.
Traffic
in
the
next
lane
appears
to
be
moving
more
smoothly
so
he
pokes
a
tentative
fender
into
Lane
B
,
which
is
heavily
populated
by
cars
also
moving
at
70
m.p.h.
.
The
adjacent
driver
in
Lane
B
has
three
choices
open
to
him
.
He
can
(
1
)
point
his
car
resolutely
at
the
invading
fender
and
force
the
other
driver
back
into
Lane
A
;
;
(
2
)
slow
down
and
permit
the
ambivalent
driver
to
change
lanes
;
;
or
(
3
)
alternately
accelerate
and
decelerate
,
thus
keeping
the
first
driver
guessing
as
to
his
intentions
,
thereby
making
a
fascinating
sport
of
the
whole
affair
.
The
really
remarkable
thing
to
me
is
that
most
California
natives
unhesitatingly
elect
to
slow
down
and
permit
the
invading
car
free
access
.
Whether
or
not
this
is
done
out
of
enlightened
self-preservation
,
I
don't
know
.
But
it
is
done
,
consistently
and
I'm
both
surprised
and
impressed
.
This
could
never
happen
in
my
native
Chicago
.
There
such
soggy
acquiesence
would
be
looked
upon
as
a
sure
sign
of
deteriorating
manhood
.
In
Chicago
,
the
driver
cut
out
would
likely
jam
his
gas
pedal
to
the
floor
in
an
effort
to
force
the
other
car
back
.
Failing
this
,
he
would
pull
alongside
at
the
first
opportunity
and
shake
his
fist
threateningly
.
This
negative
explanation
of
courtesy
on
the
freeways
,
however
,
does
an
injustice
to
Southern
California
drivers
.
At
the
risk
of
losing
my
charge-a-plate
at
Marshall
Field
and
Company
,
I
would
like
to
challenge
an
old
and
hallowed
stereotype
.
After
three
months
of
research
,
I
can
state
unequivocally
that
Los
Angeles
drivers
are
considerably
more
courteous
and
competent
than
any
other
drivers
I've
ever
encountered
.
During
one
recent
day
of
driving
about
Los
Angeles
there
were
actually
a
dozen
occasions
when
oncoming
drivers
stopped
an
entire
lane
of
traffic
to
permit
me
to
pull
out
of
an
impossible
side
street
.
Miami
,
Fla.
,
March
17
.
An
out-of-town
writer
came
up
to
Paul
Richards
today
and
asked
the
Oriole
manager
if
he
thought
his
ball
club
would
be
improved
this
year
.
Now
Richards
,
of
course
,
is
known
as
a
deep
thinker
as
baseball
managers
go
.
He
can
often
make
the
complex
ridiculously
simple
,
and
vice
versa
.
This
happened
to
be
vice
versa
,
but
even
so
,
the
answer
was
a
masterpiece
.
``
It's
a
whole
lot
easier
''
,
he
said
,
``
to
increase
the
population
of
Nevada
,
than
it
is
to
increase
the
population
of
New
York
city
''
.
And
with
that
he
walked
off
to
give
instruction
to
a
rookie
pitcher
.
``
That
is
undoubtedly
a
hell
of
a
quote
''
,
said
the
writer
,
scratching
his
head
.
``
Now
,
if
I
can
just
figure
out
what
he's
talking
about
,
I'll
use
it
''
.
Two
spots
open
This
was
just
Richard's
way
of
saying
that
last
year
the
Birds
opened
spring
training
with
a
lot
of
jobs
wide
open
.
Some
brilliant
rookies
nailed
them
down
,
so
that
this
spring
just
two
spots
,
left
and
right
field
,
are
really
up
for
grabs
.
It
should
be
easier
to
plug
two
spots
than
it
was
to
fill
the
wholesale
lots
that
were
open
last
year
,
but
so
far
it
hasn't
worked
that
way
.
This
angle
of
just
where
the
Orioles
can
look
for
improvement
this
year
is
an
interesting
one
.
You'd
never
guess
it
from
the
way
they've
played
so
far
this
spring
,
but
there
remains
a
feeling
among
some
around
here
that
the
Orioles
still
have
a
chance
to
battle
for
the
pennant
in
1961
.
Obviously
,
if
this
club
is
going
to
move
from
second
to
first
in
the
American
League
,
it
will
have
to
show
improvement
someplace
.
Where
can
that
improvement
possibly
come
from
?
?
You
certainly
can't
expect
the
infield
to
do
any
better
than
it
did
last
year
.
Robby
could
be
better
.
Brooks
Robinson
is
great
,
and
it
is
conceivable
that
he'll
do
even
better
in
1961
than
he
did
in
1960
.
You
can't
expect
it
,
though
.
Robby's
performance
last
year
was
tremendous
.
It's
the
same
with
Ron
Hansen
and
Jim
Gentile
.
If
they
do
as
well
as
they
did
in
1960
there
can
be
no
complaint
.
They
shouldn't
be
asked
to
carry
any
more
of
the
burden
.
Hansen
will
be
getting
a
late
spring
training
start
,
which
might
very
well
set
him
back
.
He
got
off
to
an
exceptional
start
last
season
,
and
under
the
circumstances
probably
won't
duplicate
it
.
There
are
some
clubs
which
claim
they
learned
something
about
pitching
to
him
last
year
.
They
don't
expect
to
stop
him
,
just
slow
him
down
some
with
the
bat
.
He'll
still
be
a
top
player
,
they
concede
,
because
he's
got
a
great
glove
and
the
long
ball
going
for
him
.
But
they
expect
to
reduce
his
over-all
offensive
production
.
Breeding
might
move
up
.
Gentile
can
hardly
do
better
than
drive
in
98
runs
.
Don't
ask
him
more
.
I
have
a
hunch
Marv
Breeding
might
move
up
a
notch
.
But
even
so
,
he
had
a
good
year
in
1960
and
won't
do
too
much
better
.
So
,
all
in
all
,
the
infield
can't
be
expected
to
supply
the
added
improvement
to
propel
the
Birds
from
second
to
first
.
And
the
pitching
will
also
have
trouble
doing
better
.
Richards
got
a
great
performance
out
of
his
combination
of
youth
and
experience
last
season
.
Where
,
then
,
can
we
look
for
improvement
?
?
``
From
Triandos
,
Brandt
and
Walker
''
,
answers
Richards
.
``
They're
the
ones
we
can
expect
to
do
better
''
.
The
man
is
right
,
and
at
this
time
,
indications
are
that
these
three
are
ready
for
better
seasons
.
Triandos
hasn't
proved
it
yet
,
but
he
says
he's
convinced
his
thumb
is
all
right
.
He
jammed
it
this
spring
and
has
had
to
rest
it
,
but
he
says
the
old
injury
hasn't
bothered
him
.
If
he
can
bounce
back
with
one
of
those
25
home
runs
years
,
the
club
will
have
to
be
better
off
offensively
.
I'm
still
not
convinced
,
though
,
I'll
have
to
see
more
of
him
before
predicting
that
big
year
for
him
.
Hank
Foiles
,
backed
up
by
Frank
House
who
will
be
within
calling
distance
in
the
minors
,
make
up
better
second
line
catching
than
the
Birds
had
all
last
year
,
but
Gus
is
still
that
big
man
you
need
when
you
start
talking
pennant
.
To
me
,
Brandt
looks
as
though
he
could
be
in
for
a
fine
year
.
He
hasn't
played
too
much
,
because
Richards
has
been
working
on
him
furiously
in
batting
practice
.
He's
hitting
the
ball
hard
,
in
the
batting
cage
,
and
his
whole
attitude
is
improved
over
this
time
last
year
.
When
he
came
to
Baltimore
,
he
was
leaving
a
team
which
was
supposed
to
win
the
National
League
pennant
,
and
he
was
joining
what
seemed
to
be
a
second
division
American
League
club
.
He
was
down
,
hard
to
talk
to
,
and
far
too
nonchalant
on
the
field
.
As
of
now
,
that
all
seems
behind
him
.
He's
been
entirely
different
all
spring
.
And
Walker
looks
stronger
,
seems
to
be
throwing
better
than
he
did
last
year
.
Let
him
bounce
back
,
and
he
could
really
set
up
the
staff
.
So
,
if
the
Orioles
are
to
improve
,
Brandt
,
Triandos
and
Walker
will
have
to
do
it
.
So
far
the
platoons
on
left
and
right
fielders
don't
seem
capable
of
carrying
the
load
.
Of
course
,
this
isn't
taking
into
consideration
the
population
of
Nevada
and
New
York
city
,
but
it's
the
way
things
look
from
here
at
this
point
.
Is
the
mother
of
an
``
autistic
''
child
at
fault
?
?
(
The
``
autistic
''
child
is
one
who
seems
to
lack
a
well-defined
sense
of
self
.
He
tends
to
treat
himself
and
other
people
as
if
they
were
objects
--
and
sometimes
he
treats
objects
as
if
they
were
people
.
)
Did
his
mother
make
him
this
way
?
?
Some
people
believe
she
did
.
We
think
differently
.
We
believe
that
autism
,
like
so
many
other
conditions
of
defect
and
deviation
,
is
to
a
large
extent
inborn
.
A
mother
can
help
a
child
adapt
to
his
difficulties
.
Sometimes
she
can
--
to
a
large
extent
--
help
him
overcome
them
.
But
we
don't
think
she
creates
them
.
We
don't
think
she
can
make
her
child
defective
,
emotionally
disturbed
or
autistic
.
The
mother
of
a
difficult
child
can
do
a
great
deal
to
help
her
own
child
and
often
,
by
sharing
her
experiences
,
she
can
help
other
mothers
with
the
same
problem
.
Since
little
is
known
about
autism
,
and
almost
nothing
has
been
written
for
the
layman
,
we'd
like
to
share
one
experienced
mother's
comments
.
She
wrote
:
total
disinterest
``
.
As
the
mother
of
an
autistic
child
who
is
lacking
in
interest
and
enthusiasm
about
almost
anything
,
I
have
to
manipulate
my
son's
fingers
for
him
when
he
first
plays
with
a
new
toy
.
He
wants
me
to
do
everything
for
him
.
``
You
don't
believe
that
autistic
children
become
autistic
because
of
something
that
happens
to
them
or
because
of
the
way
their
mother
treats
them
.
But
I
do
and
my
psychiatrist
does
,
too
.
I
know
,
that
my
son
wants
control
and
direction
,
but
being
autistic
myself
I
cannot
give
full
control
or
direction
.
``
One
thing
I
notice
which
I
have
seldom
heard
mentioned
.
This
is
that
autistic
people
don't
enjoy
physical
contact
with
others
--
for
instance
,
my
children
and
I
.
When
I
hold
my
son
he
stiffens
his
whole
body
in
my
arms
until
he
is
as
straight
and
stiff
as
a
board
.
He
pushes
and
straightens
himself
as
if
he
can't
stand
the
feeling
of
being
held
.
Physical
contact
is
uncomfortable
for
him
''
!
!
This
mother
is
quite
correct
.
As
a
rule
,
the
autistic
child
doesn't
enjoy
physical
contact
with
others
.
Parents
have
to
find
other
ways
of
comforting
him
.
For
the
young
child
this
may
be
no
more
than
providing
food
,
light
or
movement
.
As
he
grows
older
it
may
be
a
matter
of
providing
some
accustomed
object
(
his
``
magic
''
thing
)
.
Or
certain
words
or
rituals
that
child
and
adult
go
through
may
do
the
trick
.
The
answer
is
different
for
each
autistic
child
,
but
for
most
there
is
an
answer
.
Only
ingenuity
will
uncover
it
.
What
future
holds
``
Dear
Doctors
:
We
learned
this
year
that
our
older
son
,
Daniel
,
is
autistic
.
We
did
not
accept
the
diagnosis
at
once
,
but
gradually
we
are
coming
to
.
Fortunately
,
there
is
a
nursery
school
which
he
has
been
able
to
attend
,
with
a
group
of
normal
children
.
``
I
try
to
treat
Daniel
as
if
he
were
normal
,
though
of
course
I
realize
he
is
far
from
that
at
present
.
What
I
do
is
to
try
to
bring
him
into
contact
with
reality
as
much
as
possible
.
I
try
to
give
him
as
many
normal
experiences
as
possible
.
``
What
is
your
experience
with
autistic
children
?
?
How
do
they
turn
out
later
''
?
?
Many
autistic
children
grow
up
to
lead
relatively
normal
lives
.
Certainly
,
most
continue
to
lack
a
certain
warmth
in
communication
with
other
people
,
but
many
adjust
to
school
,
even
college
,
to
jobs
and
even
to
marriage
and
parenthood
.
Single-color
use
question
--
A
first
grader
colors
pictures
one
solid
color
,
everything
--
sky
,
grass
,
boy
,
wagon
,
etc.
.
When
different
colors
are
used
,
she
is
just
as
likely
to
color
trees
purple
,
hair
green
,
etc.
.
The
other
children
in
the
class
use
this
same
coloring
book
and
do
a
fairly
good
job
with
things
their
proper
color
.
Should
I
show
my
daughter
how
things
should
be
colored
?
?
She
is
an
aggressive
,
nervous
child
.
Is
a
relaxed
home
atmosphere
enough
to
help
her
outgrow
these
traits
?
?
Answer
--
Her
choice
of
one
color
means
she
is
simply
enjoying
the
motor
act
of
coloring
,
without
having
reached
the
point
of
selecting
suitable
colors
for
different
objects
.
This
immature
use
of
crayons
may
suggest
that
she
is
a
little
immature
for
the
first
grade
.
No
,
coloring
isn't
exactly
something
you
teach
a
child
.
You
sometimes
give
them
a
little
demonstration
,
a
little
guidance
,
and
suggestions
about
staying
inside
the
lines
.
But
most
learn
to
color
and
paint
as
and
when
they
are
ready
with
only
a
very
little
demonstration
.
Seen
in
decorating
circles
of
late
is
a
renewed
interest
in
an
old
art
:
embroidery
.
Possibly
responsible
for
this
is
the
incoming
trend
toward
multicolor
schemes
in
rooms
,
which
seems
slated
to
replace
the
one-color
look
to
which
we
have
been
accustomed
.
Just
as
a
varitinted
Oriental
rug
may
suggest
the
starting
point
for
a
room
scheme
,
so
may
some
of
the
newest
versions
of
embroidery
.
One
such
,
in
fact
,
is
a
rug
.
Though
not
actually
crewel
embroidery
,
it
has
that
look
with
its
over-stitched
raised
pattern
in
blue
,
pink
,
bronze
and
gold
and
a
sauterne
background
.
The
twirled
,
stylized
design
of
winding
stems
and
floral
forms
strongly
suggests
the
embroidered
patterns
used
so
extensively
for
upholstery
during
the
Jacobean
period
in
England
.
Traditional
crewel
embroidery
which
seems
to
be
appearing
more
frequently
this
fall
than
in
the
past
few
years
is
still
available
in
this
country
.
The
work
is
executed
in
England
(
by
hand
)
and
can
be
worked
in
any
desired
design
and
color
.
Among
some
recent
imports
were
seat
covers
for
one
series
of
dining
room
chairs
on
which
were
depicted
salad
plates
overflowing
with
tomatoes
and
greens
and
another
set
on
which
a
pineapple
was
worked
in
naturalistic
color
.
Chinese
influence
For
a
particularly
fabulous
room
which
houses
a
collection
of
fine
English
Chippendale
furniture
,
fabric
wall
panels
were
embroidered
with
a
typically
Chinese-inspired
design
of
this
revered
Eighteenth
Century
period
.
Since
the
work
is
done
by
hand
,
the
only
limitation
,
it
is
said
,
``
is
that
of
human
conception
''
.
Modern
embroidered
panels
,
framed
and
meant
to
be
hung
on
the
wall
,
are
another
aspect
of
this
trend
.
These
have
never
gone
out
of
style
in
Scandinavian
homes
and
now
seem
to
be
reappearing
here
and
there
in
shops
which
specialize
in
handicrafts
.
An
amateur
decorator
might
try
her
hand
at
a
pair
during
the
long
winter
evenings
,
and
,
by
picking
up
her
living
room
color
scheme
,
add
a
decorative
do-it-yourself
note
to
the
room
.
California
Democrats
this
weekend
will
take
the
wraps
off
a
1962
model
statewide
campaign
vehicle
which
they
have
been
quietly
assembling
in
a
thousand
district
headquarters
,
party
clubrooms
and
workers'
backyards
.
They
seem
darned
proud
of
it
.
And
they're
confident
that
the
GOP
,
currently
assailed
by
dissensions
within
the
ranks
,
will
be
impressed
by
the
purring
power
beneath
the
hood
of
this
grassroots-fueled
machine
.
Their
meeting
at
San
Francisco
is
nominally
scheduled
as
a
conference
of
the
California
Democratic
Council
directorate
.
But
it
will
include
200-odd
officeholders
,
organization
leaders
and
``
interested
party
people
''
.
Out
of
this
session
may
come
:
1
--
Plans
for
a
dramatic
,
broad-scale
party
rally
in
Los
Angeles
next
December
that
would
enlist
top-drawer
Democrats
from
all
over
the
country
.
2
--
Blueprints
for
doubling
the
CDC's
present
55,000
enrollment
.
3
--
Arrangements
for
a
statewide
pre-primary
endorsing
convention
in
Fresno
next
Jan.
26-28
.
4
--
And
proposals
for
a
whole
series
of
lesser
candidate-picking
conventions
in
the
state's
38
new
Congressional
districts
.
At
the
head
of
the
CDC
is
an
unorthodox
,
39-year-old
amateur
politico
,
Thomas
B.
Carvey
Jr.
,
whose
normal
profession
is
helping
develop
Hughes
Aircraft's
moon
missiles
.
He's
approached
his
Democratic
duties
in
hard-nosed
engineering
fashion
.
Viewed
from
afar
,
the
CDC
looks
like
a
rather
stalwart
political
pyramid
:
its
elected
directorate
fans
out
into
an
array
of
district
leaders
and
standing
committees
,
and
thence
into
its
component
clubs
and
affiliated
groups
--
500
or
so
.
Much
of
its
strength
stems
from
the
comfortable
knowledge
that
every
``
volunteer
''
Democratic
organization
of
any
consequence
belongs
to
the
Aj
.
Moreover
,
the
entire
state
Democratic
hierarchy
,
from
Gov.
Brown
on
down
to
the
county
chairmen
,
also
participates
in
this
huge
operation
.
Contrarily
,
Republican
``
volunteers
''
go
their
separate
ways
,
and
thus
far
have
given
no
indication
that
they'd
be
willing
to
join
forces
under
a
single
directorate
,
except
in
the
most
loose-knit
fashion
.
Carvey
believes
that
reapportionment
,
which
left
many
Democratic
clubs
split
by
these
new
district
boundaries
,
actually
will
increase
CDC
membership
.
Where
only
one
club
existed
before
,
he
says
,
two
will
flourish
henceforth
.
Biggest
organizational
problem
,
he
adds
,
is
setting
up
CDC
units
in
rock-ribbed
Democratic
territory
.
Paradoxically
the
council
is
weakest
in
areas
that
register
4-
and
5-to-1
in
the
party's
favor
,
strongest
where
Democrats
and
Republicans
compete
on
a
fairly
even
basis
.
Like
most
Democratic
spokesmen
,
Carvey
predicts
1962
will
be
a
tremendously
``
partisan
year
''
.
Hence
the
attention
they're
lavishing
on
the
Aj
.
In
all
probability
,
the
council
will
screen
and
endorse
candidates
for
the
Assembly
and
for
Congress
,
and
then
strive
to
put
its
full
weight
behind
these
pre-primary
favorites
.
This
bodes
heated
contests
in
several
districts
where
claims
have
already
been
staked
out
by
Democratic
hopefuls
who
don't
see
eye-to-eye
with
the
Aj
.
Naturally
,
the
statewide
races
will
provide
the
major
test
for
the
expanding
council
.
Shunted
aside
by
the
rampant
organizers
for
John
F.
Kennedy
last
year
,
who
relegated
it
to
a
somewhat
subordinate
role
in
the
Presidential
campaign
,
the
CDC
plainly
intends
to
provide
the
party's
campaign
muscle
in
1962
.
There
is
evidence
that
it
will
be
happily
received
by
Gov.
Brown
and
the
other
constitutional
incumbents
.
Carvey
considers
that
former
Vice
President
Nixon
would
be
Brown's
most
formidable
foe
,
with
ex-Gov.
Knight
a
close
second
.
But
the
rest
of
the
GOP
gubernatorial
aspirants
don't
worry
him
very
much
.
In
his
CDC
work
,
Carvey
has
the
close-in
support
and
advice
of
one
of
California's
shrewdest
political
strategists
:
former
Democratic
National
Committeeman
Paul
Ziffren
,
who
backed
him
over
a
Northland
candidate
espoused
by
Atty.
Gen.
Stanley
Mosk
.
(
Significantly
,
bitter
echoes
of
the
1960
power
struggle
that
saw
Mosk
moving
into
the
national
committee
post
over
Ziffren
are
still
audible
in
party
circles
.
)
note
:
We've
just
received
an
announcement
of
the
54th
Assembly
district
post-reapportionment
organizing
convention
Wednesday
night
in
South
Pasadena's
War
Memorial
Bldg.
,
which
graphically
illustrates
the
CDC's
broad
appeal
.
State
Sen.
Dick
Richards
will
keynote
;
;
state
and
county
committeemen
,
CDC
directors
and
representatives
,
members
of
16
area
clubs
,
and
``
all
residents
''
have
been
invited
.
This
is
going
to
be
a
language
lesson
,
and
you
can
master
it
in
a
few
minutes
.
It
is
a
short
course
in
Communese
.
It
works
with
English
,
Russian
,
German
,
Hungarian
or
almost
any
other
foreign
tongue
.
Once
you
learn
how
to
translate
Communese
,
much
of
each
day's
deluge
of
news
will
become
clearer
.
At
least
,
I
have
found
it
so
.
For
some
compulsive
reason
which
would
have
fascinated
Dr.
Freud
,
Communists
of
all
shapes
and
sizes
almost
invariably
impute
to
others
the
very
motives
which
they
harbor
themselves
.
They
accuse
their
enemies
of
precisely
the
crimes
of
which
they
themselves
are
most
guilty
.
President
Kennedy's
latest
warning
to
the
Communist
world
that
the
United
States
will
build
up
its
military
strength
to
meet
any
challenge
in
Berlin
or
elsewhere
was
,
somewhat
surprisingly
,
reported
in
full
text
or
fairly
accurate
excerpts
behind
the
Iron
Curtain
.
Then
the
Communese
reply
came
back
from
many
mouthpieces
with
striking
consistency
.
Now
listen
closely
:
Moscow
radio
from
the
Literary
Gazette
in
English
to
England
:
``
President
Kennedy
once
again
interpreted
the
Soviet
proposals
,
to
sign
a
peace
treaty
with
Germany
as
a
threat
,
as
part
of
the
world
menace
allegedly
looming
over
the
countries
of
capitalism
.
Evidently
the
war
drum
beating
and
hysteria
so
painstakingly
being
stirred
up
in
the
West
have
been
planned
long
in
advance
.
The
West
Berlin
crisis
is
being
played
up
artificially
because
it
is
needed
by
the
United
States
to
justify
its
arms
drive
''
.
The
Soviet
news
agency
TASS
datelined
from
New
York
in
English
to
Europe
:
``
President
Kennedy's
enlargement
of
the
American
military
program
was
welcomed
on
Wall
Street
as
a
stimulus
to
the
American
munitions
industry
.
When
the
stock
exchange
opened
this
morning
,
many
dealers
were
quick
to
purchase
shares
in
Douglas
,
Lockheed
and
United
Aircraft
and
prices
rose
substantially
.
Over
4
million
shares
were
sold
,
the
highest
figures
since
early
June
.
(
Quotations
follow
''
.
)
TASS
datelined
Los
Angeles
,
in
English
to
Europe
:
``
Former
Vice
President
Nixon
came
out
in
support
of
President
Kennedy's
program
for
stepping
up
the
arms
race
.
He
also
demanded
that
Kennedy
take
additional
measures
to
increase
international
tension
:
specifically
to
crush
the
Cuban
revolution
,
resume
nuclear
testing
,
resist
more
vigorously
admission
of
China
to
its
lawful
seat
in
the
United
Nations
,
and
postpone
non-military
programs
at
home
''
.
TASS
from
Moscow
in
English
to
Europe
:
``
The
American
press
clamored
for
many
days
promising
President
Kennedy
would
reply
to
the
most
vital
domestic
and
foreign
problems
confronting
the
United
States
.
In
fact
,
the
world
heard
nothing
but
sabre-rattling
,
the
same
exercises
which
proved
futile
for
the
predecessors
of
the
current
President
.
If
there
were
no
West
Berlin
problem
,
imperialist
quarters
would
have
invented
an
excuse
for
stepping
up
the
armaments
race
to
try
to
solve
the
internal
and
external
problems
besetting
the
United
States
and
its
NATO
partners
.
Washington
apparently
decided
to
use
an
old
formula
,
by
injecting
large
military
appropriations
to
speed
the
slow
revival
of
the
U.S.
economy
after
a
prolonged
slump
''
.
And
now
,
for
Communist
listeners
and
readers
:
Moscow
Radio
in
Russian
to
the
USSR
:
``
The
U.S.
President
has
shown
once
again
that
the
United
States
needs
the
fanning
of
the
West
Berlin
crisis
to
justify
the
armaments
race
.
As
was
to
be
expected
Kennedy's
latest
speech
was
greeted
with
enthusiasm
by
revenge-seeking
circles
in
Bonn
,
where
officials
of
the
West
German
government
praised
it
''
.
Moscow
Novosti
article
in
Russian
,
datelined
London
:
``
U.S.
pressure
on
Britain
to
foster
war
hysteria
over
the
status
of
West
Berlin
has
reached
its
apogee
.
British
common
sense
is
proverbial
.
The
present
attempts
of
the
politicians
to
contaminate
ordinary
Britons
shows
that
this
British
common
sense
is
unwilling
to
pull
somebody
else's
chestnuts
out
of
the
fire
by
new
military
adventures
''
.
East
Berlin
(
Communist
)
radio
in
German
to
Germany
:
``
A
better
position
for
negotiations
is
the
real
point
of
this
speech
.
Kennedy
knows
the
West
will
not
wage
war
for
West
Berlin
,
neither
conventional
nor
nuclear
,
and
negotiations
will
come
as
certainly
as
the
peace
treaty
.
Whenever
some
Washington
circles
were
really
ready
for
talks
to
eliminate
friction
they
have
always
succumbed
to
pressure
from
the
war
clique
in
the
Pentagon
and
in
Bonn
.
In
Kennedy's
speech
are
cross
currents
,
sensible
ones
and
senseless
ones
,
reflecting
the
great
struggle
of
opinions
between
the
President's
advisers
and
the
political
and
economic
forces
behind
them
.
Well
,
dear
listeners
,
despite
all
the
shouting
,
there
will
be
no
war
over
West
Berlin
''
.
Moscow
TASS
in
Russian
datelined
Sochi
:
``
Chairman
Khrushchev
received
the
U.S.
President's
disarmament
adviser
,
John
McCloy
.
Their
conversation
and
dinner
passed
in
a
warm
and
friendly
atmosphere
''
.
Now
,
to
translate
from
the
Communese
,
this
means
:
The
``
West
Berlin
''
crisis
is
really
an
East
Berlin
crisis
.
The
crisis
was
artificially
stirred
up
by
the
Kremlin
(
Wall
Street
)
and
the
Red
Army
(
Pentagon
)
egged
on
by
the
West
Germans
(
East
Germans
)
.
The
reason
was
to
speed
up
domestic
production
in
the
USSR
,
which
Khrushchev
promised
upon
grabbing
power
,
and
try
to
end
the
permanent
recession
in
Russian
living
standards
.
Chairman
Khrushchev
(
Kennedy
)
rattles
his
rockets
(
sabre
)
in
order
to
cure
his
internal
ills
and
to
strengthen
his
negotiating
position
.
His
advisers
in
the
Politburo
(
White
House
)
are
engaged
in
a
great
struggle
of
opinions
,
so
he
is
not
always
consistent
.
The
Soviet
Union
will
fight
neither
a
conventional
nor
a
nuclear
war
over
Berlin
,
and
neither
will
its
Warsaw
Pact
allies
.
The
West
has
no
intention
of
attacking
Russia
.
Chairman
Khrushchev
and
John
McCloy
had
a
terrible
row
at
Sochi
.
See
,
Communese
is
easy
--
once
you
get
onto
it
.
Aug.
4
,
1821
,
nearly
a
century
after
Benjamin
Franklin
founded
the
Pennsylvania
Gazette
--
a
century
during
which
it
had
undergone
several
changes
in
ownership
and
a
few
brief
suspensions
in
publication
--
this
paper
made
its
first
appearance
as
the
Saturday
Evening
Post
.
The
country
was
now
full
of
Gazettes
and
Samuel
C.
Atkinson
and
Charles
Alexander
,
who
had
just
taken
over
Franklin's
old
paper
,
desired
a
more
distinctive
name
.
When
founded
by
Franklin
the
Gazette
was
a
weekly
family
newspaper
and
under
its
new
name
its
format
remained
that
of
a
newspaper
but
its
columns
gradually
contained
more
and
more
fiction
,
poetry
,
and
literary
essays
.
In
the
middle
of
the
century
,
with
a
circulation
of
90,000
,
the
Post
was
one
of
the
most
popular
weeklies
in
the
country
.
But
during
the
second
half
of
the
century
its
fortunes
reached
a
low
point
and
when
in
1897
Cyrus
H.
K.
Curtis
purchased
it
--
``
paper
,
type
,
and
all
''
--
for
$1,000
it
was
a
16-page
weekly
filled
with
unsigned
fiction
and
initialed
miscellany
,
and
with
only
some
2,000
subscribers
.
Little
more
than
a
fine
old
name
,
valuable
principally
because
of
the
Franklin
tradition
,
the
Saturday
Evening
Post
was
slow
to
revive
.
But
Curtis
poured
over
$1
million
into
it
and
in
time
it
again
became
one
of
the
most
popular
weeklies
of
the
country
.
``
Remember
the
French
railroad
baron
who
was
going
to
take
me
floating
down
the
Nile
''
?
?
``
Remember
the
night
Will
Rogers
filled
a
tooth
for
me
between
numbers
''
?
?
``
Sure
,
we
met
a
barrel
of
rich
men
but
it's
hard
to
find
the
real
thing
when
you're
young
,
beautiful
and
the
toast
of
two
continents
''
``
Remember
Fanny
Brice
promised
my
mother
she
would
look
after
me
on
the
road
''
?
?
All
this
remembering
took
place
the
other
night
when
I
had
supper
with
the
Ziegfeld
Girls
at
the
Beverly
Hills
Club
.
A
quarter
of
a
century
has
gone
by
since
this
bevy
of
walking
dreams
sashayed
up
and
down
the
staircases
of
the
old
New
Amsterdam
Theater
,
N.Y.
.
But
watching
Mrs.
Cyril
Ring
,
Berniece
Dalton
Janssen
,
Mrs.
Robert
Jarvis
,
Mrs.
Walter
Adams
order
low-calorie
seafood
,
no
bread
,
I
could
see
the
Ziegfeld
Girls
of
1920
were
determined
to
be
glamorous
grandmothers
of
1961
.
I
was
anxious
to
hear
about
those
dazzling
days
on
the
Great
White
Way
.
All
I
could
remember
was
Billie
Dove
pasted
over
the
ceiling
of
my
big
brother's
room
.
``
Billie
was
really
beautiful
''
!
!
Exclaimed
Vera
Forbes
Adams
,
batting
lovely
big
eyes
behind
glitter
rimmed
glasses
.
Sing
Sing's
prisoner
strike
was
motivated
by
a
reasonable
purpose
,
a
fair
break
from
parole
boards
.
But
once
the
strike
trend
hits
hoosegows
,
there
is
no
telling
how
far
it
may
go
.
Inmates
might
even
demand
the
34-hour
week
,
all
holidays
off
and
fringe
benefits
including
state
contributions
toward
lawyers'
fees
.
Some
day
we
might
see
a
Federation
of
Prison
and
Jail
Inmates
,
with
a
leader
busily
trying
to
organize
reformatory
occupants
,
defendants
out
on
bail
,
convicts
opposed
to
probation
officers
,
etc.
.
A
three-day
confinement
week
,
with
a
month's
vacation
and
shorter
hours
all
around
could
be
an
ultimate
demand
from
cell
occupants
of
the
nation
,
with
fringe
benefits
including
:
1
.
Wider
space
between
iron
bars
and
agreement
by
prison
boards
to
substitute
rubber
in
20
per
cent
of
metal
.
2
.
An
agreement
allowing
convicts
to
pass
on
type
of
locks
used
on
prison
doors
.
In
case
of
a
deadlock
between
prison
boards
and
inmates
,
a
federal
arbitration
board
to
include
a
``
lifer
''
and
two
escapees
should
decide
the
issue
.
3
.
Specific
broadening
of
travel
rights
.
4
.
The
right
to
leave
the
hoosegow
any
time
to
see
a
lawyer
instead
of
waiting
for
a
lawyer
to
make
a
trip
to
the
prison
.
5
.
Recognition
of
Prisoners
Union
rule
that
no
member
of
an
iron
or
steel
workers
union
be
permitted
to
repair
a
sawed-off
bar
without
approval
and
participation
of
representative
of
the
cell
occupant
.
6
.
No
warden
or
guard
to
touch
lock
,
key
or
doorknob
except
when
accompanied
by
a
prisoners'
committee
with
powers
of
veto
.
7
.
State
and
federal
approval
of
right
to
walk
out
at
any
time
when
so
voted
by
51
per
cent
of
the
prisoners
.
The
death
of
Harold
A.
Stevens
,
oldest
of
the
Stevens
brothers
,
famed
operators
of
baseball
,
football
and
race
track
concessions
,
revived
again
the
story
of
one
of
the
greatest
business
successes
in
history
.
Harold
,
with
brothers
Frank
,
Joe
and
William
,
took
over
at
the
death
of
their
father
,
Harry
M.
Stevens
,
who
put
a
few
dollars
into
a
baseball
program
,
introduced
the
``
hot
dog
''
and
paved
the
way
for
creation
of
a
catering
empire
.
Family
loyalties
and
cooperative
work
have
been
unbroken
for
generations
.
IBM
has
a
machine
that
can
understand
spoken
words
and
talk
back
.
Nevertheless
,
it
will
seem
funny
to
have
to
send
for
a
mechanic
to
improve
conversation
.
Rembrandt's
``
Aristotle
Contemplating
Bust
of
Homer
''
brought
$2,300,000
at
auction
the
other
night
.
Both
Aristotle
and
Homer
may
in
spirit
be
contemplating
``
bust
''
of
the
old-fashioned
American
dollar
.
The
owner
of
the
painting
got
it
for
$750,000
,
sold
it
for
$500,000
in
a
market
crash
,
and
bought
it
back
for
$590,000
.
Apologies
are
in
order
from
anybody
who
said
,
``
Are
you
sure
you're
not
making
a
mistake
''
?
?
``
Wagon
Train
''
is
reported
the
No.
1
TV
show
.
After
all
,
where
else
can
the
public
see
a
wagon
these
days
?
?
Lucius
Beebe's
book
,
``
Mr.
Pullman's
Elegant
Palace
Car
''
,
fills
us
with
nostalgia
,
recalling
days
when
private
cars
and
Pullmans
were
extra
wonderful
,
with
fine
woodwork
,
craftsmanship
in
construction
,
deep
carpets
and
durable
upholstery
.
Beebe
tells
of
one
private
car
that
has
gold
plumbing
.
Jay
Gould
kept
a
cow
on
one
deluxer
.
Washington
--
Rep.
Frelinghuysen
,
R-5th
Dist.
,
had
a
special
reason
for
attending
the
reception
at
the
Korean
Embassy
for
Gen.
Chung
Hee
Park
,
the
new
leader
of
South
Korea
.
Not
only
is
Mr.
Frelinghuysen
a
member
of
the
House
Foreign
Affairs
Committee
,
but
he
is
the
grandson
of
the
man
who
was
instrumental
in
opening
relations
between
the
United
States
and
Korea
,
Frederick
T.
Frelinghuysen
,
Secretary
of
State
in
the
administration
of
Chester
A.
Arthur
.
In
addition
Rep.
Frelinghuysen's
brother
Harry
was
on
the
Korean
desk
of
the
State
Department
in
World
War
2
.
Next
year
is
the
80th
anniversary
of
the
signing
of
the
treaty
between
Korea
and
the
United
States
and
experts
in
Seoul
are
trying
to
find
the
correspondence
between
Frederick
Frelinghuysen
,
who
was
Secretary
of
State
in
1883
and
1884
,
and
Gen.
Lucius
Foote
,
who
was
the
first
minister
to
Korea
.
They
enlisted
the
help
of
the
New
Jersey
congressman
,
who
has
been
able
to
trace
the
letters
to
the
national
archives
,
where
they
are
available
on
microfilm
.
On
the
job
A
top
official
of
the
New
Frontier
who
kept
a
record
of
his
first
weeks
on
the
job
here
gives
this
report
of
his
experiences
:
In
his
first
six
weeks
in
office
he
presided
over
96
conferences
,
attended
35
official
breakfasts
and
dinners
,
studied
and
signed
285
official
papers
and
personally
took
312
telephone
calls
.
In
addition
,
he
said
,
he
has
answered
more
than
400
messages
of
congratulations
which
led
him
to
the
comment
that
he
himself
had
decided
he
wouldn't
send
another
congratulatory
message
for
the
rest
of
his
life
.
Sen.
Case
Aj
,
has
received
a
nice
``
thank
you
''
note
from
a
youngster
he
appointed
to
the
Air
Force
Academy
in
Colorado
.
Air
Force
life
is
great
,
the
cadet
wrote
,
``
though
the
fourth-class
system
is
no
fun
''
.
He
invited
Mr.
Case
to
stop
by
to
say
hello
if
he
ever
visited
the
academy
and
then
added
that
he
was
on
the
managerial
staff
of
the
freshman
football
team
``
We
have
just
returned
from
Roswell
,
N.M.
,
where
we
were
defeated
,
34
to
9
''
,
the
young
man
noted
.
``
We
have
a
tremendous
amount
of
talent
--
but
we
lack
cohesion
''
.
Kind
Mr.
Sam
Among
the
many
stories
about
the
late
Speaker
Rayburn
is
one
from
Rep.
Dwyer
,
R-6th
Dist.
.
Mrs.
Dwyer's
husband
,
M.
Joseph
Dwyer
,
was
taking
a
10-year-old
boy
from
Union
County
on
the
tour
of
the
Capitol
during
the
final
weeks
of
the
last
session
.
They
ran
across
Mr.
Rayburn
and
the
youngster
expressed
a
desire
to
get
the
Speaker's
autograph
.
Mr.
Dwyer
said
that
although
it
was
obvious
that
Mr.
Rayburn
was
not
well
he
stopped
,
gave
the
youngster
his
autograph
,
asked
where
he
was
from
and
expressed
the
hope
that
he
would
enjoy
his
visit
to
Congress
.
Two
days
later
Mr.
Rayburn
left
Washington
for
the
last
time
.
The
350th
anniversary
of
the
King
James
Bible
is
being
celebrated
simultaneously
with
the
publishing
today
of
the
New
Testament
,
the
first
part
of
the
New
English
Bible
,
undertaken
as
a
new
translation
of
the
Scriptures
into
contemporary
English
.
Since
it
was
issued
in
the
spring
of
1611
,
the
King
James
Version
has
been
most
generally
considered
the
most
poetic
and
beautiful
of
all
translations
of
the
Bible
.
However
,
Biblical
scholars
frequently
attested
to
its
numerous
inaccuracies
,
as
old
manuscripts
were
uncovered
and
scholarship
advanced
.
This
resulted
in
revisions
of
the
King
James
Bible
in
1881-85
as
the
English
Revised
Version
and
in
1901
as
the
American
Standard
Version
.
Then
in
1937
America's
International
Council
of
Religious
Education
authorized
a
new
revision
,
in
the
light
of
expanded
knowledge
of
ancient
manuscripts
and
languages
.
Undertaken
by
32
American
scholars
,
under
the
chairmanship
of
Rev.
Dr.
Luther
A.
Weigle
,
former
dean
of
Yale
University
Divinity
School
,
their
studies
resulted
in
the
publishing
of
the
Revised
Standard
Version
,
1946-52
.
Not
rival
The
New
English
Bible
(
the
Old
Testament
and
Apocrypha
will
be
published
at
a
future
date
)
has
not
been
planned
to
rival
or
replace
the
King
James
Version
,
but
,
as
its
cover
states
,
it
is
offered
``
simply
as
the
Bible
to
all
those
who
will
use
it
in
reading
,
teaching
,
or
worship
''
.
Time
,
of
course
will
testify
whether
the
new
version
will
have
achieved
its
purpose
.
Bible
reading
,
even
more
so
than
good
classical
music
,
grows
in
depth
and
meaning
upon
repetition
.
If
this
new
Bible
does
not
increase
in
significance
by
repeated
readings
throughout
the
years
,
it
will
not
survive
the
ages
as
has
the
King
James
Version
.
However
,
an
initial
perusal
and
comparison
of
some
of
the
famous
passages
with
the
same
parts
of
other
versions
seems
to
speak
well
of
the
efforts
of
the
British
Biblical
scholars
.
One
is
impressed
with
the
dignity
,
clarity
and
beauty
of
this
new
translation
into
contemporary
English
,
and
there
is
no
doubt
that
the
meaning
of
the
Bible
is
more
easily
understandable
to
the
general
reader
in
contemporary
language
in
the
frequently
archaic
words
and
phrases
of
the
King
James
.
For
example
,
in
the
third
chapter
of
Matthew
,
verses
13-16
,
describing
the
baptism
of
Jesus
,
the
1611
version
reads
:
``
Then
cometh
Jesus
from
Galilee
to
Jordan
unto
John
,
to
be
baptized
of
him
.
``
But
John
forbad
him
,
saying
,
I
have
need
to
be
baptized
of
thee
,
and
comest
thou
to
me
?
?
``
And
Jesus
answering
said
unto
him
,
Suffer
it
to
be
so
now
:
for
thus
it
becometh
us
to
fulfill
all
righteousness
.
Then
he
suffered
him
.
``
And
Jesus
,
when
he
was
baptized
went
up
straightway
out
of
the
water
:
and
lo
,
the
heavens
were
opened
unto
him
,
and
he
saw
the
Spirit
of
God
descending
like
a
dove
,
and
lighting
upon
him
''
.
Clearer
meaning
Certainly
,
the
meaning
is
clearer
to
one
who
is
not
familiar
with
Biblical
teachings
,
in
the
New
English
Bible
which
reads
:
``
Then
Jesus
arrived
at
Jordan
from
Galilee
,
and
he
came
to
John
to
be
baptized
by
him
.
John
tried
to
dissuade
him
.
'
Do
you
come
to
me
'
?
?
He
said
;
;
'
I
need
rather
to
be
baptized
by
you
.
Jesus
replied
,
'
let
it
be
so
for
the
present
;
;
we
do
well
to
conform
this
way
with
all
that
God
requires
.
John
then
allowed
him
to
come
.
After
baptism
Jesus
came
up
out
of
the
water
at
once
,
and
at
that
moment
heaven
opened
;
;
he
saw
the
Spirit
of
God
descending
like
a
dove
to
alight
upon
him
''
;
;
(
the
paragraphing
,
spelling
and
punctuation
are
reproduced
as
printed
in
each
version
.
)
Among
the
most
frequently
quoted
Biblical
sentences
are
the
Beatitudes
and
yet
so
few
persons
,
other
than
scholars
,
really
understand
the
true
meaning
of
these
eight
blessings
uttered
by
Jesus
at
the
beginning
of
the
Sermon
on
the
Mount
.
To
illustrate
,
the
first
blessing
in
the
King
James
Bible
reads
:
``
Blessed
are
the
poor
in
spirit
;
;
for
their's
is
the
kingdom
of
heaven
''
.
The
new
version
states
:
``
How
blest
are
those
who
know
that
they
are
poor
;
;
the
kingdom
of
Heaven
is
theirs
''
.
Some
of
the
poetic
cadence
of
the
older
version
certainly
is
lost
in
the
newer
one
,
but
almost
anyone
,
with
a
fair
knowledge
of
the
English
language
,
can
understand
the
meaning
,
without
the
necessity
of
interpretation
by
a
Biblical
scholar
.
To
a
novice
that
is
significant
.
In
the
second
and
third
chapters
of
Revelation
the
new
version
retains
,
however
,
the
old
phrase
``
angel
of
the
church
''
which
Biblical
scholars
have
previously
interpreted
as
meaning
bishop
.
This
is
not
contemporary
English
.
Mostly
contemporary
For
the
most
part
,
however
,
the
new
version
is
contemporary
and
,
as
such
,
should
be
the
means
for
many
to
attain
a
clearer
comprehension
of
the
meaning
of
those
words
recorded
so
many
hundreds
of
years
ago
by
the
first
followers
of
Christ
.
Originally
recorded
by
hand
,
these
words
have
been
copied
and
recopied
,
translated
and
retranslated
through
the
ages
.
Discoveries
recently
made
of
old
Biblical
manuscripts
in
Hebrew
and
Greek
and
other
ancient
writings
,
some
by
the
early
church
fathers
,
in
themselves
called
for
a
restudy
of
the
Bible
.
To
have
the
results
recorded
in
everyday
usable
English
should
be
of
benefit
to
all
who
seek
the
truth
.
There
is
one
danger
,
however
.
With
contemporary
English
changing
with
the
rapidity
that
marks
this
jet
age
,
some
of
the
words
and
phrases
of
the
new
version
may
themselves
soon
become
archaic
.
The
only
answer
will
be
continuous
study
.
The
New
Testament
offered
to
the
public
today
is
the
first
result
of
the
work
of
a
joint
committee
made
up
of
representatives
of
the
Church
of
England
,
Church
of
Scotland
,
Methodist
Church
,
Congregational
Union
,
Baptist
Union
,
Presbyterian
Church
of
England
,
Churches
in
Wales
,
Churches
in
Ireland
,
Society
of
Friends
,
British
and
Foreign
Bible
Society
and
National
Society
of
Scotland
.
Prof.
C.
H.
Dodd
,
76
,
a
Congregational
minister
and
a
leading
authority
on
the
New
Testament
,
is
general
director
of
the
project
and
chairman
of
the
New
Testament
panel
.
Sizzling
temperatures
and
hot
summer
pavements
are
anything
but
kind
to
the
feet
.
That
is
why
it
is
important
to
invest
in
comfortable
,
airy
types
of
shoes
.
There
are
many
soft
and
light
shoe
leathers
available
.
Many
styles
have
perforations
and
an
almost
weightlessness
achieved
via
unlined
leathers
.
Softness
is
found
in
crushed
textures
.
Styles
run
the
gamut
from
slender
and
tapered
with
elongated
toes
to
a
newer
squared
toe
shape
.
Heels
place
emphasis
on
the
long
legged
silhouette
.
Wine
glass
heels
are
to
be
found
in
both
high
and
semi-heights
.
Stacked
heels
are
also
popular
on
dressy
or
tailored
shoes
.
Just
the
barest
suggestion
of
a
heel
is
found
on
teenage
pumps
.
Coolest
shade
While
white
is
the
coolest
summer
shade
,
there
are
lots
of
pastel
hues
along
with
tintable
fabrics
that
will
blend
with
any
wardrobe
color
.
In
the
tintable
group
are
high
and
little
heels
,
squared
and
oval
throats
,
and
shantung-like
textures
.
Don't
overlook
the
straws
this
year
.
They
come
in
crisp
basket
weaves
in
natural
honey
hues
,
along
with
lacey
open
weaves
with
a
lustre
finish
in
natural
,
white
,
black
and
a
whole
range
of
colors
.
In
the
casual
field
straws
feature
wedge
heels
of
cork
or
carved
wood
in
a
variety
of
styles
.
For
added
comfort
some
of
the
Italian
designed
sandals
have
foam
padded
cushioning
.
The
citrus
tones
popular
in
clothing
are
also
to
be
found
afoot
.
Orange
and
lemon
are
considered
important
as
are
such
pastels
as
blue
and
lilac
.
In
a
brighter
nautical
vein
is
Ille
De
France
blue
.
Contrast
trim
provides
other
touches
of
color
.
Spectators
in
white
crush
textures
dip
toe
and
heel
in
smooth
black
,
navy
and
taffy
tan
.
Designed
for
ease
Designed
for
summer
comfort
are
the
shoes
illustrated
.
At
the
left
is
a
pair
of
dressy
straw
pumps
in
a
light
,
but
crisp
texture
.
In
a
lacey
open
weave
shoes
have
a
luster
finish
,
braided
collar
and
bow
highlight
on
the
squared
throat
.
At
right
is
a
casual
style
in
a
crushed
unlined
white
leather
.
Flats
have
a
scalloped
throat
.
An
electric
toothbrush
(
Broxodent
)
may
soon
take
its
place
next
to
the
electric
razor
in
the
American
bathroom
.
The
brush
moves
up
and
down
and
is
small
enough
to
clean
every
dental
surface
,
including
the
back
of
the
teeth
.
In
addition
,
the
motor
has
the
seal
of
approval
of
the
Underwriters
Laboratories
,
which
means
it
is
safe
.
The
unit
consists
of
a
small
motor
that
goes
on
as
soon
as
it
is
plugged
in
.
The
speed
is
controlled
by
pressing
on
the
two
brake
buttons
located
where
the
index
finger
and
thumb
are
placed
when
holding
the
motor
.
The
brushes
can
be
cleaned
and
sterilized
by
boiling
and
are
detachable
so
that
every
member
of
the
family
can
have
his
own
.
Most
of
us
brush
our
teeth
by
hand
.
The
same
can
be
said
of
shaving
yet
the
electric
razor
has
proved
useful
to
many
men
.
The
electric
toothbrush
moves
in
a
vertical
direction
,
the
way
dentists
recommend
.
In
addition
,
it
is
small
enough
to
get
into
crevices
,
jacket
and
crown
margins
,
malposed
anteriors
,
and
the
back
teeth
.
The
bristles
are
soft
enough
to
massage
the
gums
and
not
scratch
the
enamel
.
It
is
conceivable
that
Broxodent
could
do
a
better
job
than
ordinary
brushing
,
especially
in
those
who
do
not
brush
their
teeth
properly
.
Several
dentists
and
patients
with
special
dental
problems
have
experimented
with
the
device
.
The
results
were
good
although
they
are
difficult
to
compare
with
hand
brushing
,
particularly
when
the
individual
knows
how
to
brush
his
teeth
properly
.
The
electric
gadget
is
most
helpful
when
there
are
many
crowned
teeth
and
in
individuals
who
are
elderly
,
bedfast
with
a
chronic
disease
,
or
are
handicapped
by
disorders
such
as
cerebral
palsy
or
muscular
dystrophy
.
But
for
many
of
us
,
it
will
prove
an
enjoyable
luxury
.
It
is
not
as
convenient
as
the
old
type
toothbrush
and
the
paste
tends
to
shimmy
off
the
bristles
.
Since
the
apparatus
is
new
,
it
requires
experimentation
and
changes
in
technique
.
Turn
over
writes
:
Does
numbness
in
the
left
hand
at
night
,
which
awakens
the
person
,
indicate
brain
tumor
?
?
Reply
:
no
.
This
is
a
common
symptom
and
the
cause
usually
is
pressure
on
the
nerve
leading
to
the
affected
hand
.
The
pressure
may
come
from
muscles
,
tendons
,
or
bones
anywhere
from
the
neck
to
the
hand
.
Steam
baths
writes
:
Do
steam
baths
have
any
health
value
?
?
Reply
:
No
,
other
than
cleaning
out
the
pores
and
making
the
sweat
glands
work
harder
.
An
ordinary
hot
bath
or
shower
will
do
the
same
.
Sewing
brings
numbness
writes
:
What
makes
my
hands
numb
when
sewing
?
?
Reply
:
There
are
many
possibilities
,
including
poor
circulation
,
a
variety
of
neurological
conditions
,
and
functional
disorders
.
This
manifestation
may
be
an
early
sign
of
multiple
sclerosis
or
the
beginning
of
sewer's
cramp
.
Brace
for
sciatica
writes
:
Does
a
brace
help
in
sciatica
?
?
Reply
:
A
back
brace
might
help
,
depending
upon
the
cause
of
sciatica
.
Cholesterol
and
thyroid
writes
:
Does
the
cholesterol
go
down
when
most
of
the
thyroid
gland
is
removed
?
?
Reply
:
no
.
It
usually
goes
up
.
The
cholesterol
level
in
the
blood
is
influenced
by
the
glands
of
the
body
.
It
is
low
when
the
thyroid
is
overactive
and
high
when
the
gland
is
sluggish
.
The
latter
is
likely
to
occur
when
the
thyroid
is
removed
.
The
gap
between
the
bookshelf
and
the
record
cabinet
grows
smaller
with
each
new
recording
catalogue
.
There's
more
reading
and
instruction
to
be
heard
on
discs
than
ever
before
,
although
the
spoken
rather
than
the
sung
word
is
as
old
as
Thomas
Alva
Edison's
first
experiment
in
recorded
sound
.
Edison
could
hardly
have
guessed
,
however
,
that
Sophocles
would
one
day
appear
in
stereo
.
If
the
record
buyer's
tastes
are
somewhat
eclectic
or
even
the
slightest
bit
esoteric
,
he
will
find
them
satisfied
on
educational
records
.
And
he
will
avoid
eye-strain
in
the
process
.
Everything
from
poetry
to
phonetics
,
history
to
histrionics
,
philosophy
to
party
games
has
been
adapted
to
the
turntable
.
For
sheer
ambition
,
take
the
Decca
series
titled
modestly
``
Wisdom
''
.
Volumes
One
and
Two
,
selected
from
the
sound
tracks
of
a
television
series
,
contain
``
conversations
with
the
elder
wise
men
of
our
day
''
.
These
sages
include
poet
Carl
Sandburg
,
statesman
Jawaharlal
Nehru
and
sculptor
Jacques
Lipchitz
,
in
Volume
One
,
and
playwright
Sean
O'Casey
,
David
Ben-Gurion
,
philosopher
Bertrand
Russell
and
the
late
Frank
Lloyd
Wright
in
the
second
set
.
Hugh
Downs
is
heard
interviewing
Wright
,
for
an
added
prestige
fillip
.
There's
more
specialization
and
a
narrower
purpose
in
two
albums
recently
issued
by
Dover
Publications
.
Dover
``
publishes
''
what
the
company
calls
``
Listen
And
Learn
''
Productions
designed
to
teach
foreign
languages
.
Previous
presentations
have
been
on
French
,
Spanish
,
Russian
,
Italian
,
German
and
Japanese
.
But
the
firm
has
recognized
the
tight
dollar
and
the
tourist's
desire
to
visit
the
``
smaller
,
less-traveled
and
relatively
inexpensive
countries
''
,
and
is
now
prepared
to
teach
modern
Greek
and
Portuguese
through
recordings
.
The
respective
vocabularies
``
essential
for
travel
''
are
available
in
separate
albums
.
Thanks
to
Spoken
Arts
Records
,
history
buffs
may
hear
Lincoln's
``
most
memorable
speeches
and
letters
''
in
a
two-disc
set
,
interpreted
by
Lincoln
authority
and
lecturer
Roy
P.
Basler
.
As
a
contemporary
bonus
,
the
set
includes
Carl
Sandburg's
address
at
a
joint
session
of
Congress
,
delivered
on
Lincoln's
birthday
two
years
ago
.
For
those
who
``
like
poetry
but
never
get
around
to
reading
it
''
,
the
Library
of
Congress
makes
it
possible
for
poets
to
be
heard
reading
their
own
work
.
The
program
was
instituted
in
1940
,
and
releases
are
available
only
from
the
Recording
Laboratory
of
the
Library
of
Congress
,
Washington
25
,
D.C.
.
A
catalogue
is
available
on
request
.
Newest
on
the
list
are
John
Ciardi
,
W.
D.
Snodgrass
,
I.
A.
Richards
,
Oscar
Williams
,
Robert
Hillyer
,
John
Hall
Wheelock
,
Stephen
Vincent
Benet
,
Edwin
Muir
,
John
Peal
Bishop
and
Maxwell
Bodenheim
.
Two
poets
are
paired
on
each
record
,
in
the
order
given
above
.
Decca
is
not
the
only
large
commercial
company
to
impart
instruction
.
RCA
Victor
has
an
ambitious
and
useful
project
in
a
stereo
series
called
``
Adventures
In
Music
''
,
which
is
an
instructional
record
library
for
elementary
schools
.
Howard
Mitchell
and
the
National
Symphony
perform
in
the
first
two
releases
,
designed
for
grades
one
and
two
.
Teaching
guides
are
included
with
each
record
.
In
an
effort
to
fortify
himself
against
the
unforseen
upsets
sure
to
arise
in
the
future
,
Herbert
A.
Leggett
,
banker-editor
of
the
Phoenix
``
Arizona
Progress
''
,
reflects
upon
a
few
of
the
depressing
experiences
of
the
feverish
fifties
.
One
of
the
roughest
was
the
TV
quiz
shows
,
which
gave
him
inferiority
complexes
.
Though
it
was
a
great
relief
when
the
big
brains
on
these
shows
turned
out
to
be
frauds
and
phonies
,
it
did
irreparable
damage
to
the
ego
of
the
editor
and
many
another
intelligent
,
well-informed
American
.
But
the
one
that
upset
the
financially
wise
was
the
professional
dancer
who
related
in
a
book
how
he
parlayed
his
earnings
into
a
$2,000,000
profit
on
the
stock
market
.
Every
man
who
dabbles
in
the
market
to
make
a
little
easy
money
on
the
side
and
suffers
losses
could
at
the
time
hardly
face
his
wife
who
was
wondering
how
her
husband
could
be
so
dumb
.
Investors
breathed
more
freely
when
it
was
learned
that
this
acrobatic
dancer
had
turned
magician
and
was
only
doing
a
best
seller
book
to
make
some
dough
.
People
who
take
us
for
suckers
are
like
the
Westerner
who
had
on
exhibit
his
superior
marksmanship
in
the
form
of
a
number
of
bull's-eye
achievements
.
The
promoter
who
wanted
to
sign
him
up
for
the
circus
asked
him
how
he
was
able
to
do
it
.
His
answer
was
simple
but
honest
.
He
just
shot
at
the
board
and
then
drew
circles
around
the
holes
to
form
a
bull's-eye
.
One
of
the
obstacles
to
the
easy
control
of
a
2-year-old
child
is
a
lack
of
verbal
communication
.
The
child
understands
no
.
He
senses
his
mother's
disapproval
.
But
explanations
leave
him
confused
and
unmoved
.
If
his
mother
loves
him
,
he
clings
to
that
love
as
a
ballast
.
It
motivates
his
behavior
.
He
wants
Mommy
to
think
him
a
good
boy
.
He
doesn't
want
her
to
look
frowningly
at
him
,
or
speak
to
him
angrily
.
This
breaks
his
heart
.
He
wants
to
be
called
sweet
,
good
,
considerate
and
mother's
little
helper
.
But
even
mother's
loving
attitude
will
not
always
prevent
misbehavior
.
His
desires
are
so
strong
that
he
needs
constant
reassurance
of
his
mother's
love
for
him
and
what
she
expects
of
him
,
in
order
to
overcome
them
.
His
own
inner
voice
,
which
should
tell
him
what
not
to
do
,
has
not
developed
.
It
won't
develop
until
he
has
words
with
which
to
clothe
it
.
The
conscience
is
non-existent
in
the
2-year-old
.
What
can
a
mother
do
then
to
prevent
misbehavior
?
?
She
can
decrease
the
number
of
temptations
.
She
can
remove
all
knick-knacks
within
reach
.
The
fewer
nos
she
has
to
utter
the
more
effective
they
will
be
.
She
should
offer
substitutes
for
the
temptations
which
seem
overwhelmingly
desirable
to
the
child
.
If
he
can't
play
with
Mommy's
magazines
,
he
should
have
some
old
numbers
of
his
own
.
If
Daddy's
books
are
out
of
bounds
his
own
picture
books
are
not
.
Toys
he
has
can
be
made
to
act
as
substitutes
for
family
temptations
such
as
refrigerator
and
gas
stove
.
During
this
precarious
period
of
development
the
mother
should
continue
to
influence
the
growth
of
the
child's
conscience
.
She
tells
him
of
the
consequences
of
his
behavior
.
If
he
bites
a
playmate
she
says
,
``
Danny
won't
like
you
''
.
If
he
snatches
a
toy
,
she
says
,
``
Caroline
wants
her
own
truck
just
as
you
do
''
.
There
is
no
use
trying
to
``
Explain
''
to
a
2-year-old
.
Actions
speak
louder
.
Remove
temptations
.
Remove
the
child
from
the
scene
of
his
misbehavior
.
Substitute
approved
objects
for
forbidden
ones
and
keep
telling
him
how
he
is
to
act
.
He
won't
submit
to
his
natural
desires
all
the
time
,
and
it's
Mother's
love
that
is
responsible
for
his
good
behavior
.
This
is
the
period
during
the
melancholy
days
of
autumn
when
universities
and
colleges
schedule
what
they
call
``
Homecoming
Day
''
.
They
seek
thereby
to
lure
the
old
grad
back
to
the
old
scenes
.
The
football
opponent
on
homecoming
is
,
of
course
,
selected
with
the
view
that
said
opponent
will
have
little
more
chance
than
did
a
Christian
when
thrown
to
one
of
the
emperor's
lions
.
It
is
true
,
of
course
,
the
uncertainties
of
life
being
what
they
are
,
that
as
now
and
then
the
Christian
killed
the
lion
,
homecoming
days
have
been
ruined
by
a
visiting
team
.
Even
with
all
possible
precaution
,
homecomings
are
usually
rather
cruel
and
sad
,
and
only
the
perpetually
ebullient
and
the
continually
optimistic
are
made
happy
by
them
.
More
often
than
not
,
as
the
Old
Grad
wanders
along
the
old
paths
,
his
memory
of
happy
days
when
he
strolled
one
of
the
paths
with
a
coed
beside
him
becomes
an
ache
and
a
pain
.
He
can
smell
again
the
perfume
she
wore
and
recall
the
lilting
sound
of
laughter
,
and
can
smell
again
the
aroma
of
autumn
--
fallen
leaves
,
the
wine
of
cool
air
,
and
the
nostalgia
of
woodsmoke
which
blows
through
all
the
winds
of
fall
.
Undergraduates
It
is
at
precisely
such
moments
that
he
encounters
a
couple
of
undergraduates
,
faces
alight
,
holding
hands
and
talking
happily
as
they
come
along
,
oblivious
of
him
,
or
throwing
him
the
most
fleeting
and
casual
of
glances
,
such
as
they
would
give
a
tethered
goat
.
Usually
,
they
titter
loudly
after
they
have
passed
by
.
His
dream
goes
.
He
feels
,
suddenly
,
the
weight
of
the
fat
that
is
on
him
.
His
bridgework
or
his
plates
feel
loose
and
monstrous
.
His
bifocals
blur
.
His
legs
suddenly
feel
heavy
and
unaccountably
weary
,
as
if
he
had
walked
for
miles
,
instead
of
strolling
a
few
hundred
yards
along
the
old
campus
paths
.
Bitterness
comes
over
him
and
the
taste
of
time
is
like
unripe
persimmons
in
his
mouth
.
It
is
not
much
better
if
he
meets
with
old
classmates
.
Too
often
,
unless
he
hails
them
,
they
pass
him
by
.
He
recalls
with
a
wry
smile
the
wit
who
said
,
on
returning
from
a
homecoming
reunion
,
that
he
would
never
go
again
because
all
his
class
had
changed
so
much
they
didn't
even
recognize
him
.
If
they
do
meet
and
recognize
one
another
,
slap
backs
and
embrace
,
the
moment
soon
is
done
.
After
all
,
when
one
has
asked
whatever
became
of
old
Joe
and
Charlie
when
one
has
inquired
who
it
was
Sue
Brown
married
and
where
it
is
they
now
live
when
questions
are
asked
and
answered
about
families
and
children
,
and
old
professors
when
the
game
and
its
probable
outcome
has
been
exhausted
that
does
it
.
Middle-aged
spread
By
then
one
begins
to
notice
the
middle-age
spread
;
;
the
gray
hairs
,
the
eyeglasses
,
bodies
that
are
too
thin
or
too
heavy
;
;
the
fading
signs
of
old
beauty
;
;
the
athlete
of
by-gone
years
who
wears
a
size
46
suit
and
puffs
when
he
has
finished
a
sentence
of
any
length
then
,
it
is
time
to
break
it
up
and
move
on
.
It
is
,
if
anything
,
worse
on
the
old
player
He
sits
in
the
stands
and
he
doesn't
like
that
.
Enough
of
his
life
was
spent
there
on
the
field
for
him
never
to
like
watching
the
game
as
a
spectator
in
the
crowd
.
He
always
feels
lonely
.
A
team
feels
something
.
On
a
team
a
man
feels
he
is
a
part
of
it
and
akin
to
the
men
next
to
him
.
In
the
stands
he
is
lonely
and
lost
,
no
matter
how
many
are
about
him
.
He
sits
there
remembering
the
tense
moment
before
the
ball
was
snapped
;
;
the
churning
of
straining
feet
,
the
rasp
of
the
canvas
pants
;
;
the
smell
and
feel
of
hot
,
wet
woolen
sleeves
across
his
face
.
He
remembers
the
desperate
,
panting
breath
;
;
the
long
runs
on
the
kick-offs
;
;
the
hard
,
jolting
tackles
;
;
the
breakthrough
;
;
the
desperate
agony
of
goal-line
stands
.
And
so
,
he
squirms
with
each
play
,
remembering
his
youth
.
But
it
is
no
use
.
It
is
gone
.
No
matter
how
often
a
man
goes
back
to
the
scenes
of
his
youth
and
strength
,
they
can
never
be
recaptured
again
.
Since
the
obvious
is
not
always
true
,
the
Republican
National
Committee
wisely
analyzed
its
defeat
of
last
autumn
and
finds
that
it
occurred
,
as
suspected
,
in
the
larger
cities
.
Of
40
cities
with
populations
of
300,000
and
more
,
Mr.
Kennedy
carried
26
and
Mr.
Nixon
14
.
There
are
eight
states
in
which
the
largest
urban
vote
can
be
the
balance
of
power
in
any
close
election
.
These
are
New
York
,
Pennsylvania
,
Michigan
,
Maryland
,
Missouri
,
New
Jersey
,
Illinois
and
Minnesota
.
In
1952
Mr.
Eisenhower
won
all
but
Missouri
.
Yet
,
in
1960
all
eight
gave
majorities
to
Mr.
Kennedy
.
Republican
research
broke
down
the
vote
in
Philadelphia
.
Mr.
Nixon
,
despite
a
very
earnest
effort
to
capture
the
minority
groups
,
failed
to
do
so
.
His
visit
to
Warsaw
,
Poland
,
after
the
Russian
journey
in
the
summer
of
1959
was
expected
to
win
the
Polish
vote
which
,
in
several
cities
,
is
substantial
.
Yet
,
the
GOP
breakdown
discovered
that
in
Philadelphia
Mr.
Nixon
received
but
21
per
cent
of
the
so-called
``
Polish
''
vote
;
;
30
per
cent
of
the
``
Irish
''
vote
,
and
18
per
cent
of
the
``
Negro
''
vote
.
'
task
force
'
A
GOP
``
task
force
'
committee
will
seek
to
find
out
how
its
party
may
win
support
from
the
ethnic
and
minority
groups
in
cities
.
The
task
force
might
make
a
start
in
Washington
with
Republican
congressional
leaders
.
These
gentlemen
already
have
done
the
party
harm
by
their
seeming
reluctance
to
vote
aid
for
the
depressed
areas
and
by
their
criticism
of
Mr.
Kennedy
for
talking
about
a
recession
and
unemployment
.
This
error
was
compounded
by
declaring
the
recession
to
be
``
a
statistical
one
''
,
and
not
a
reality
.
The
almost
six
million
persons
without
jobs
and
the
two
million
working
part-time
do
not
consider
themselves
and
their
plight
as
statistical
.
They
did
not
view
the
tour
of
the
distressed
cities
and
towns
by
Secretary
of
Labor
Goldberg
as
politics
,
which
the
GOP
declared
it
to
be
.
The
people
visited
were
glad
to
have
a
government
with
heart
enough
to
take
an
interest
in
their
misery
.
Senator
Mundt's
gross
distortion
of
President
Eisenhower's
conversation
into
a
denunciation
of
President
Kennedy
as
too
left
wing
,
a
statement
Mr.
Eisenhower
declared
to
be
entirely
false
,
is
another
case
in
point
.
If
the
Republicans
and
Southern
Democrats
join
to
defeat
medical
care
for
the
old
under
the
Social
Security
program
,
they
will
thereby
erect
still
another
barrier
to
GOP
hopes
in
the
cities
.
Errors
repeated
The
present
Republican
leadership
as
practiced
by
Mundt
,
Goldwater
,
Bridges
,
Dirksen
,
et
al
,
is
repeating
the
errors
of
the
party
leadership
of
the
1930s
.
In
that
decade
the
partisan
zeal
to
defend
Mr.
Hoover
,
and
the
party's
failure
to
anticipate
or
cope
with
the
depression
,
caused
a
great
majority
of
Americans
to
see
the
Republican
party
as
cold
and
lacking
in
any
sympathy
for
the
problems
of
human
beings
caught
up
in
the
distress
and
suffering
brought
on
by
the
economic
crash
.
The
Republican
party
was
not
lacking
in
humanity
,
but
it
permitted
its
extremely
partisan
leadership
to
make
it
appear
devoid
of
any
consideration
for
people
in
trouble
.
Farmers
called
their
mule-drawn
pickup
trucks
``
Hoover
carts
''
.
Smokers
reduced
to
``
the
makings
''
,
spoke
of
the
sack
tobacco
as
``
Hoover
dust
''
.
One
may
be
sure
the
present
Republican
congressional
leadership
hasn't
meant
to
repeat
this
error
.
But
it
is
in
the
process
of
so
doing
because
it
apparently
gives
priority
to
trying
to
downgrade
John
F.
Kennedy
.
That
this
is
not
good
politics
is
underscored
by
the
latest
poll
figures
which
show
that
72
per
cent
of
the
people
like
the
way
in
which
the
new
President
is
conducting
the
nation's
business
.
The
most
articulate
Republicans
are
those
who
,
in
their
desire
to
get
back
at
Mr.
Kennedy
,
already
have
created
the
image
of
a
Republican
leadership
which
is
reluctant
to
assist
the
distressed
and
the
unemployed
,
and
which
is
even
more
unwilling
to
help
old
people
who
need
medical
care
.
If
they
also
defeat
the
school
bill
,
the
GOP
task
force
won't
have
much
research
to
do
.
It
will
early
know
why
the
party
won't
win
back
city
votes
.
The
1962
General
Assembly
has
important
business
to
consider
.
The
tragedy
is
that
it
will
not
be
able
to
transact
that
business
in
any
responsible
manner
.
After
the
Griffin-Byrd
political
troup
has
completed
the
circuit
in
November
in
the
name
of
a
Pre-Legislative
Forum
,
this
is
going
to
be
the
most
politically
oriented
Legislature
in
history
.
Every
legislator
from
Brasstown
Bald
to
Folkston
is
going
to
have
his
every
vote
subjected
to
the
closest
scrutiny
as
a
test
of
his
political
allegiances
,
not
his
convictions
.
Hoped-for
legislative
action
on
adjustment
of
the
county
unit
system
stands
less
chance
than
ever
.
And
just
how
far
can
the
Legislature
go
toward
setting
up
a
self-insurance
system
for
the
state
in
the
midst
of
a
governor's
race
''
?
?
How
unpartisan
will
be
the
recommendations
of
Lt.
Gov.
Garland
Byrd's
Senate
Committee
on
Government
Operations
?
?
The
situation
already
was
bad
because
the
Legislature
moved
the
governor's
race
forward
a
few
months
,
causing
the
campaigning
to
get
started
earlier
than
usual
.
But
when
former
Gov.
Marvin
Griffin
and
Lt.
Gov.
Byrd
accepted
the
invitations
of
the
Georgia
State
Chamber
of
Commerce
to
join
the
tour
next
November
,
the
situation
was
aggravated
.
Neither
had
a
choice
other
than
to
accept
the
invitation
.
To
have
refused
would
have
been
political
suicide
.
And
it
may
be
that
one
or
both
men
actually
welcomed
the
opportunity
,
when
the
bravado
comments
are
cast
aside
.
The
Georgia
State
Chamber
of
Commerce
tried
to
guard
against
the
danger
of
eliminating
potential
candidates
.
It
wanted
the
State
Democratic
Executive
Committee
to
pick
the
``
serious
candidates
''
.
But
State
Party
Chairman
James
Gray
of
Albany
said
no
,
and
he
didn't
mince
any
words
.
``
They
are
just
asking
too
much
''
,
he
said
.
We
can't
think
of
anyone
else
who
would
want
to
separate
serious
candidates
from
other
candidates
,
either
.
There
are
other
dangers
:
Politics
is
an
accelerating
game
.
``
If
an
opponent
accuses
you
of
lying
,
don't
deny
it
.
Say
he
is
a
horse
thief
''
,
runs
an
old
adage
.
These
men
are
spenders
.
If
either
one
ever
started
making
promises
,
there
is
no
telling
where
the
promises
would
end
.
Griffin's
Rural
Roads
Authority
and
Byrd's
60,000
miles
of
county
contracts
would
look
like
pauper's
oaths
.
The
trouble
is
that
at
first
glance
the
idea
looks
like
such
a
good
one
.
Why
not
have
them
travel
the
state
in
November
debating
?
?
It
would
present
a
forum
for
them
in
almost
every
community
.
But
further
thought
brings
the
shuddery
visions
of
a
governor's
race
being
run
in
the
next
Legislature
,
the
spectre
of
big
spending
programs
,
the
ooze
of
mudslinging
before
the
campaign
should
even
begin
.
There
is
a
way
out
of
this
.
The
Chamber
has
not
arranged
a
pre-legislative
forum
.
It
has
arranged
a
campaign
for
governor
.
If
it
will
simply
delay
the
debates
until
the
qualifications
are
closed
next
spring
,
and
then
carry
all
the
candidates
on
a
tour
of
debates
,
it
can
provide
a
service
to
the
state
.
But
the
Legislature
should
be
granted
the
opportunity
to
complete
its
work
before
choosing
up
sides
for
the
race
.
Former
British
Prime
Minister
Attlee
says
Eisenhower
was
not
a
``
great
soldier
''
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
KeyboardInterrupt                         Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-11-da03533690f5> in <module>()
      1 for bro in brown.words():
----> 2     print(bro)

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/ipykernel/iostream.py in write(self, string)
    350             is_child = (not self._is_master_process())
    351             # only touch the buffer in the IO thread to avoid races
--> 352             self.pub_thread.schedule(lambda : self._buffer.write(string))
    353             if is_child:
    354                 # newlines imply flush in subprocesses

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/ipykernel/iostream.py in schedule(self, f)
    188                 event_id = os.urandom(16)
    189             self._events[event_id] = f
--> 190             self._event_pipe.send(event_id)
    191         else:
    192             f()

zmq/backend/cython/socket.pyx in zmq.backend.cython.socket.Socket.send (zmq/backend/cython/socket.c:7305)()

zmq/backend/cython/socket.pyx in zmq.backend.cython.socket.Socket.send (zmq/backend/cython/socket.c:7048)()

zmq/backend/cython/socket.pyx in zmq.backend.cython.socket._send_copy (zmq/backend/cython/socket.c:2920)()

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/zmq/backend/cython/checkrc.pxd in zmq.backend.cython.checkrc._check_rc (zmq/backend/cython/socket.c:9621)()

KeyboardInterrupt: 
In [ ]:
from mltk.book import * 
In [12]:
myusr = getpass.getuser()
In [13]:
myusr
Out[13]:
'wcm'
In [14]:
trumpreq = requests.get('https://api.whatdoestrumpthink.com/api/v1/quotes')
In [15]:
trumpdict = json.loads(trumpreq.text)
In [16]:
rannopers = random.choice(trumpdict['messages']['non_personalized'])
In [ ]:
 
In [17]:
ranpers = random.choice(trumpdict['messages']['personalized'])
In [18]:
#rannopers.replace('I', )
In [19]:
ranpers
Out[19]:
'is dealing with men who get off the reservation.'
In [20]:
leakurl = 'https://www.leaksapi.com/clinton-emails/from/8a52166f-1ff2-4060-9215-3583895df339'
In [21]:
leku = requests.get(leakurl)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
SSLError                                  Traceback (most recent call last)
/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/connectionpool.py in urlopen(self, method, url, body, headers, retries, redirect, assert_same_host, timeout, pool_timeout, release_conn, chunked, body_pos, **response_kw)
    599                                                   body=body, headers=headers,
--> 600                                                   chunked=chunked)
    601 

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/connectionpool.py in _make_request(self, conn, method, url, timeout, chunked, **httplib_request_kw)
    344         try:
--> 345             self._validate_conn(conn)
    346         except (SocketTimeout, BaseSSLError) as e:

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/connectionpool.py in _validate_conn(self, conn)
    843         if not getattr(conn, 'sock', None):  # AppEngine might not have  `.sock`
--> 844             conn.connect()
    845 

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/connection.py in connect(self)
    325             server_hostname=hostname,
--> 326             ssl_context=context)
    327 

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/util/ssl_.py in ssl_wrap_socket(sock, keyfile, certfile, cert_reqs, ca_certs, server_hostname, ssl_version, ciphers, ssl_context, ca_cert_dir)
    324     if HAS_SNI:  # Platform-specific: OpenSSL with enabled SNI
--> 325         return context.wrap_socket(sock, server_hostname=server_hostname)
    326 

/usr/lib/python3.5/ssl.py in wrap_socket(self, sock, server_side, do_handshake_on_connect, suppress_ragged_eofs, server_hostname)
    384                          server_hostname=server_hostname,
--> 385                          _context=self)
    386 

/usr/lib/python3.5/ssl.py in __init__(self, sock, keyfile, certfile, server_side, cert_reqs, ssl_version, ca_certs, do_handshake_on_connect, family, type, proto, fileno, suppress_ragged_eofs, npn_protocols, ciphers, server_hostname, _context)
    759                         raise ValueError("do_handshake_on_connect should not be specified for non-blocking sockets")
--> 760                     self.do_handshake()
    761 

/usr/lib/python3.5/ssl.py in do_handshake(self, block)
    995                 self.settimeout(None)
--> 996             self._sslobj.do_handshake()
    997         finally:

/usr/lib/python3.5/ssl.py in do_handshake(self)
    640         """Start the SSL/TLS handshake."""
--> 641         self._sslobj.do_handshake()
    642         if self.context.check_hostname:

SSLError: [SSL: CERTIFICATE_VERIFY_FAILED] certificate verify failed (_ssl.c:720)

During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred:

SSLError                                  Traceback (most recent call last)
/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/adapters.py in send(self, request, stream, timeout, verify, cert, proxies)
    437                     retries=self.max_retries,
--> 438                     timeout=timeout
    439                 )

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/connectionpool.py in urlopen(self, method, url, body, headers, retries, redirect, assert_same_host, timeout, pool_timeout, release_conn, chunked, body_pos, **response_kw)
    629             clean_exit = False
--> 630             raise SSLError(e)
    631 

SSLError: [SSL: CERTIFICATE_VERIFY_FAILED] certificate verify failed (_ssl.c:720)

During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred:

SSLError                                  Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-21-530daa9dbcce> in <module>()
----> 1 leku = requests.get(leakurl)

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/api.py in get(url, params, **kwargs)
     70 
     71     kwargs.setdefault('allow_redirects', True)
---> 72     return request('get', url, params=params, **kwargs)
     73 
     74 

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/api.py in request(method, url, **kwargs)
     56     # cases, and look like a memory leak in others.
     57     with sessions.Session() as session:
---> 58         return session.request(method=method, url=url, **kwargs)
     59 
     60 

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/sessions.py in request(self, method, url, params, data, headers, cookies, files, auth, timeout, allow_redirects, proxies, hooks, stream, verify, cert, json)
    516         }
    517         send_kwargs.update(settings)
--> 518         resp = self.send(prep, **send_kwargs)
    519 
    520         return resp

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/sessions.py in send(self, request, **kwargs)
    637 
    638         # Send the request
--> 639         r = adapter.send(request, **kwargs)
    640 
    641         # Total elapsed time of the request (approximately)

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/adapters.py in send(self, request, stream, timeout, verify, cert, proxies)
    510         except (_SSLError, _HTTPError) as e:
    511             if isinstance(e, _SSLError):
--> 512                 raise SSLError(e, request=request)
    513             elif isinstance(e, ReadTimeoutError):
    514                 raise ReadTimeout(e, request=request)

SSLError: [SSL: CERTIFICATE_VERIFY_FAILED] certificate verify failed (_ssl.c:720)
In [ ]:
allusers = json.loads(leku.text)
In [22]:
rannopers
Out[22]:
"The beauty of me is that I'm very rich."
In [ ]:
 
In [23]:
print(rannopers.replace('America', 'Hogwarts'))
The beauty of me is that I'm very rich.
In [24]:
for allus in allusers:
    lanpers = random.choice(trumpdict['messages']['personalized'])
    #print('{} {}'.format(allus, lanpers))
    #toke = nltk.word_tokenize('{} {}'.format(allus, lanpers))
    #print(toke)
    lpaz = ('{} {}'.format(allus, lanpers))
    print(lpaz.upper())
    #print(rannopers.replace('I', lanpers))
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
NameError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-24-9c610b10cac8> in <module>()
----> 1 for allus in allusers:
      2     lanpers = random.choice(trumpdict['messages']['personalized'])
      3     #print('{} {}'.format(allus, lanpers))
      4     #toke = nltk.word_tokenize('{} {}'.format(allus, lanpers))
      5     #print(toke)

NameError: name 'allusers' is not defined
In [ ]:
 
In [28]:
leakrec = 'http://www.leaksapi.com/clinton-emails/to/8a52166f-1ff2-4060-9215-3583895df339'
In [29]:
lekrec = requests.get(leakrec)
In [30]:
jsrecipient = json.loads(lekrec.text)
In [31]:
jsrecipient
Out[31]:
['Philippe Reines',
 'Cheryl Mills',
 '',
 'Richard Verma',
 'Sidney Blumenthal',
 'Jake Sullivan',
 'Huma Abedin',
 'Robert Russo',
 'Lauren Jiloty',
 'Lona Valmoro',
 'Monica Hanley',
 'Hillary Clinton',
 'Anne-Marie Slaughter',
 'Cherie Blair',
 'Melanne Verveer',
 'Arturo Valenzuela',
 'Strobe Talbott',
 'Betsy Ebeling',
 'Capricia Marshall',
 'Samuel (\\Sandy\\") Berger"',
 'William Burns',
 'Burns Strider',
 'Andrew Shapiro',
 'rooneym@state.gov',
 'Lissa Muscatine',
 'Kris Balderston',
 'Barbara Mikulski',
 'Kurt Campbell',
 'Judith McHale',
 'Marty Torrey',
 'Rodriguez Miguel',
 'Lynn Forester de Rothschild',
 'Maggie Williams',
 'Tomicah Tillemann',
 'Courtney Beale',
 'Ellen Tauscher',
 'Bill Clinton',
 'Mark Penn',
 'Michael Fuchs',
 'Nora Toiv',
 'Doug Hattaway',
 'Phillip Crowley',
 'Philip Gordon',
 'Maria Otero',
 'Harold Hongju Koh',
 'KellyC@state.gov',
 'James Steinberg',
 'Jacob Lew',
 'Todd Stern',
 'Rajiv Shah',
 'Esther Brimmer',
 'Oscar Flores',
 'Barack Obama',
 'Daniel',
 'Jennifer Robinson',
 'Janice Jacobs',
 'Voda Ebeling',
 'Neera Tanden',
 'Susan Rice',
 'Daniel Schwerin',
 'aclb',
 'William Hubbard',
 'Michael Posner',
 'John Olver',
 'Bonnie Klehr',
 'Han Duk-soo',
 'Kent Conrad',
 'Doug Band',
 'Philip Crowley',
 'LGraham',
 'Carlos Pascual',
 'Michele Bond',
 'Justin Cooper',
 'Christopher Edwards',
 'Suzanne Grantham',
 'United States of America',
 'Govenman Etazini',
 'Mark Hyman',
 'Luzzatto',
 'Oscar Lores',
 'Daniel Baer',
 'Jeffrey Feltman',
 'macmanusje2@state.gov',
 'harry.b.harris',
 'adamsds@state.gov',
 'judithmchale',
 'sheldon_whitehouse2@whitehouse.senate.gov',
 'jvillarreal',
 'wellsag@state.gov',
 'haroldnaughton',
 'Wendy Sherman',
 'Johnnie Carson',
 'thomas_e._donilon',
 'ros-lehtinen',
 'Thomas Nides',
 'jalili, saeed',
 'eeas',
 'ashton, catherine margaret',
 'monrovia',
 'patterson, anne w',
 'Thomas Donilon',
 'shermanwr@state.gov',
 'klang',
 'dennis_b._ross',
 'haledm2@state.gov',
 'andrea_j_palm',
 'jkeane',
 'mitchellg@state.gov',
 'Lanny Davis',
 'samuelson, heather f',
 'samuelson, heather',
 'soros, jonathan',
 'ross, dennis b.',
 'bin abd al-aziz al saud, abdullah',
 'S',
 'woodardew2@state.gov',
 'gentlemen',
 'Recos',
 'sullivanjj@state/gov',
 'wilson, joseph',
 'record',
 'pelosi, nancy',
 'valerie',
 'bosworth, steve',
 'reid, harry',
 'Miguel Rodriguez',
 'lieutenant colonel alfredo najera',
 'Claire Coleman',
 'abedinh@state;gov',
 'senjohnkerry',
 'Robert Hormats',
 'kussa',
 'davidson, jon',
 'pascualc@state.gov',
 'schu',
 'donilon, tom',
 'thomas.r.pickering',
 'martilla, john',
 'mission pk',
 'kissinger, henry',
 'komorowski, bronislaw',
 'mon',
 'crocker, bathsheba n',
 'powellnj@state.gov',
 'carpentermv@state.gov',
 'Diane Reynolds',
 'lrobinson',
 'cfalvo@usaid.gov',
 'stockjs@state.gov',
 'pattersonaw@state.gov',
 'klain, ron',
 'goosby, eric',
 'mspence',
 'kennedypf@state.gov',
 'whom it may concern',
 'Gorden Gray',
 'joe',
 'friedd@state.gov',
 'rshah@usaid.gov',
 'diane, reynolds',
 'secretary of state for foreign and commonwealth affairs',
 'joseph.wilson',
 'Biography',
 'Hill',
 'Maura Pally',
 'Huma Abedin; Hillary Clinton',
 'Hillary Clinton; Philippe Reines',
 'Peter Robinson',
 'Rosemarie Howe',
 'Sir',
 'Kabul LGF Request',
 'WHADP',
 'Ban Ki-moon',
 'ASUNCION',
 'rrh.interiors',
 'Laurie Rubiner',
 'David Axelrod',
 'John Podesta',
 'Rick Sloan',
 'mhcaleja@state.gov',
 'l',
 'Brian Greenspun',
 'mh.interiors',
 'Jim Kennedy',
 'Council on Foreign Relations',
 'Rosemarie Howe ;Hillary Clinton',
 'Rene Preval',
 'Donald',
 'Cheryl Mills ;Hillary Clinton',
 'Karl Eikenberry',
 'Tina Flournoy',
 'Jan Piercy',
 'Derek Chollet',
 'David Garten',
 'Jeffrey Farrow',
 'Michele Flournoy',
 'Cheryl',
 'Department of State',
 'Lourdes Cue',
 'Gina Glantz',
 'Christopher Hill',
 'Lisa Caputo',
 'Richard Holbrooke',
 'Nancy Parrish',
 'Scott Gration',
 'Thomas Shannon',
 'Terry Duffy',
 'preines;h',
 'fernandez, richard r',
 'mayor_re',
 'rverma',
 'davisjl4@state.gov',
 'sullilvanjj@state.gov',
 'pathfinder',
 'bshillady',
 'r_m_gates',
 'robert.kagan',
 'jilliscol',
 'jamesprubin',
 'penal@state.gov',
 'humamabedin',
 'rossaj@state.gov',
 'sandmw@state.gov',
 'DanielJJ@state.gov',
 'davidmilibandpersonal',
 'varma, vivek',
 'Joanne Laszczych',
 'mmonroe',
 'dhattaway',
 'dross',
 'alec.ross',
 'adlerce@state.gov',
 'tina.brownny',
 'feldmandf@state.gov',
 'mmoore',
 'kkazzarelli',
 'jacobsonrs@state.gov',
 'mfuchs.mike',
 'roy.spence',
 'kktowns',
 'rrussony',
 'flournoy, tina',
 'grossmanmi@state.gov',
 'jhuber2606',
 'barnett, robert b',
 'jillichtman',
 'chairman',
 'jonrdavidson',
 'David Hale',
 'shapiro, daniel b',
 'rubin, james p',
 'kruzich, joseph',
 'Robert Blake',
 'shongole37',
 'congress',
 'haillary',
 'millcd@state.gov',
 'haiti dlc distro',
 'munter, cameron p',
 'list',
 'see distribution',
 'Eric Woodard',
 'valenzuela,arturo a',
 'stephen.roach',
 'Patrick Kennedy',
 'edelman, marty',
 'habedin',
 'nyu-poly community',
 'spence, roy',
 'David Adams',
 'u.s. dept of state protocol',
 'murphy, terry b.',
 'sheeran, josette',
 'abedomj@state.gov',
 'blaker2@state.gov',
 'abbaszadehn@state.gov',
 'schwartzep@state.gov',
 'besty.ebeling@illinois.gov',
 'tyson',
 'meehanb@state.gov',
 'pennrhodeen',
 'nora.toiv',
 'jamierubin',
 'Yoweri Museveni',
 'Counselor',
 'David Miliband',
 'harold.koplewicz',
 'Joshua Daniel',
 'keith, adam e',
 'hunter, robert',
 'carroll, sean',
 'wen jiabao',
 'hyman, mark',
 'mcdonough, denis r',
 'united states mission to the united nations',
 'borns, jeff',
 'cdea, ambassador wayne',
 'io:edmonson, susan',
 'bondy, steve',
 'szubin, adam',
 'macaskill, kenny',
 'Megan Rooney',
 'Sung Kim',
 'Francis Ricciardone',
 'ALDAC',
 'Deborah Graze',
 'Member of Congress',
 'Judith',
 'Saxby Chambliss',
 'Walter Isaacson',
 'Kati Marton',
 'Yousaf Gilani',
 'Prime Minister',
 'Republican Members',
 'WoodardEW@state.gov',
 'Lois Quam',
 'Embassy of the Argentine Republic',
 'IRS',
 'Dan Schwerin',
 'george']
In [32]:
reqsub = ('https://www.leaksapi.com/clinton-emails/subject/8a52166f-1ff2-4060-9215-3583895df339')
In [33]:
rsub = requests.get(reqsub)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
SSLError                                  Traceback (most recent call last)
/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/connectionpool.py in urlopen(self, method, url, body, headers, retries, redirect, assert_same_host, timeout, pool_timeout, release_conn, chunked, body_pos, **response_kw)
    599                                                   body=body, headers=headers,
--> 600                                                   chunked=chunked)
    601 

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/connectionpool.py in _make_request(self, conn, method, url, timeout, chunked, **httplib_request_kw)
    344         try:
--> 345             self._validate_conn(conn)
    346         except (SocketTimeout, BaseSSLError) as e:

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/connectionpool.py in _validate_conn(self, conn)
    843         if not getattr(conn, 'sock', None):  # AppEngine might not have  `.sock`
--> 844             conn.connect()
    845 

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/connection.py in connect(self)
    325             server_hostname=hostname,
--> 326             ssl_context=context)
    327 

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/util/ssl_.py in ssl_wrap_socket(sock, keyfile, certfile, cert_reqs, ca_certs, server_hostname, ssl_version, ciphers, ssl_context, ca_cert_dir)
    324     if HAS_SNI:  # Platform-specific: OpenSSL with enabled SNI
--> 325         return context.wrap_socket(sock, server_hostname=server_hostname)
    326 

/usr/lib/python3.5/ssl.py in wrap_socket(self, sock, server_side, do_handshake_on_connect, suppress_ragged_eofs, server_hostname)
    384                          server_hostname=server_hostname,
--> 385                          _context=self)
    386 

/usr/lib/python3.5/ssl.py in __init__(self, sock, keyfile, certfile, server_side, cert_reqs, ssl_version, ca_certs, do_handshake_on_connect, family, type, proto, fileno, suppress_ragged_eofs, npn_protocols, ciphers, server_hostname, _context)
    759                         raise ValueError("do_handshake_on_connect should not be specified for non-blocking sockets")
--> 760                     self.do_handshake()
    761 

/usr/lib/python3.5/ssl.py in do_handshake(self, block)
    995                 self.settimeout(None)
--> 996             self._sslobj.do_handshake()
    997         finally:

/usr/lib/python3.5/ssl.py in do_handshake(self)
    640         """Start the SSL/TLS handshake."""
--> 641         self._sslobj.do_handshake()
    642         if self.context.check_hostname:

SSLError: [SSL: CERTIFICATE_VERIFY_FAILED] certificate verify failed (_ssl.c:720)

During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred:

SSLError                                  Traceback (most recent call last)
/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/adapters.py in send(self, request, stream, timeout, verify, cert, proxies)
    437                     retries=self.max_retries,
--> 438                     timeout=timeout
    439                 )

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/connectionpool.py in urlopen(self, method, url, body, headers, retries, redirect, assert_same_host, timeout, pool_timeout, release_conn, chunked, body_pos, **response_kw)
    629             clean_exit = False
--> 630             raise SSLError(e)
    631 

SSLError: [SSL: CERTIFICATE_VERIFY_FAILED] certificate verify failed (_ssl.c:720)

During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred:

SSLError                                  Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-33-5a7019b5d79d> in <module>()
----> 1 rsub = requests.get(reqsub)

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/api.py in get(url, params, **kwargs)
     70 
     71     kwargs.setdefault('allow_redirects', True)
---> 72     return request('get', url, params=params, **kwargs)
     73 
     74 

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/api.py in request(method, url, **kwargs)
     56     # cases, and look like a memory leak in others.
     57     with sessions.Session() as session:
---> 58         return session.request(method=method, url=url, **kwargs)
     59 
     60 

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/sessions.py in request(self, method, url, params, data, headers, cookies, files, auth, timeout, allow_redirects, proxies, hooks, stream, verify, cert, json)
    516         }
    517         send_kwargs.update(settings)
--> 518         resp = self.send(prep, **send_kwargs)
    519 
    520         return resp

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/sessions.py in send(self, request, **kwargs)
    637 
    638         # Send the request
--> 639         r = adapter.send(request, **kwargs)
    640 
    641         # Total elapsed time of the request (approximately)

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/adapters.py in send(self, request, stream, timeout, verify, cert, proxies)
    510         except (_SSLError, _HTTPError) as e:
    511             if isinstance(e, _SSLError):
--> 512                 raise SSLError(e, request=request)
    513             elif isinstance(e, ReadTimeoutError):
    514                 raise ReadTimeout(e, request=request)

SSLError: [SSL: CERTIFICATE_VERIFY_FAILED] certificate verify failed (_ssl.c:720)
In [ ]:
subnam = rsub.text
In [34]:
jssubn = json.loads(subnam)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
NameError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-34-0fe865bc3743> in <module>()
----> 1 jssubn = json.loads(subnam)

NameError: name 'subnam' is not defined
In [35]:
timenow = arrow.now()
In [36]:
print(timenow.datetime)
2017-09-05 23:29:07.631718+12:00
In [37]:
requests.get('http://api.duckduckgo.com/?q={}&format=json'.format(jsub))
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
NameError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-37-7cb106170dc5> in <module>()
----> 1 requests.get('http://api.duckduckgo.com/?q={}&format=json'.format(jsub))

NameError: name 'jsub' is not defined
In [38]:
duckreq.text
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
NameError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-38-15fcc8575e24> in <module>()
----> 1 duckreq.text

NameError: name 'duckreq' is not defined
In [39]:
for jsub in jssubn:
    if ('RUSSIA') in jsub:
        
        duckreq = requests.get('http://api.duckduckgo.com/?q={}&format=json'.format(jsub))
        print(json.loads(duckreq.text))
        
        
        dashgo = (jsub.replace('-', ''))
        dashno = dashgo.replace(' ', '-')
        print(dashno.capitalize())
        #with open('/home/{}/website/posts/{}.md'.format(myusr, dashno.lower()), 'w') as webmd:
        #    webmd.write('{}\n{}'.format(jsub.capitalize()))
        
        #with open('/home/{}/website/posts/{}.meta'.format(myusr, dashno.lower()), 'w') as daweb:
        #    daweb.write('{}\n{}\n{}'.format(jsub.capitalize(), dashno.lower(), timenow.datetime))
            
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
NameError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-39-89b8790b95a0> in <module>()
----> 1 for jsub in jssubn:
      2     if ('RUSSIA') in jsub:
      3 
      4         duckreq = requests.get('http://api.duckduckgo.com/?q={}&format=json'.format(jsub))
      5         print(json.loads(duckreq.text))

NameError: name 'jssubn' is not defined
In [40]:
emailids = list()
In [ ]:
 
In [41]:
for jsrecp in jsrecipient:
    if (`'Mills') in jsrecp:
        print(jsrecp)
        reqrecipt = ('https://www.leaksapi.com/clinton-emails/to/8a52166f-1ff2-4060-9215-3583895df339/{}').format(jsrecp)
        recipreq = requests.get(reqrecipt)
        emailids.append(recipreq.text)
    
  File "<ipython-input-41-59234a11664f>", line 2
    if (`'Mills') in jsrecp:
        ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax
In [42]:
jsrecipient
Out[42]:
['Philippe Reines',
 'Cheryl Mills',
 '',
 'Richard Verma',
 'Sidney Blumenthal',
 'Jake Sullivan',
 'Huma Abedin',
 'Robert Russo',
 'Lauren Jiloty',
 'Lona Valmoro',
 'Monica Hanley',
 'Hillary Clinton',
 'Anne-Marie Slaughter',
 'Cherie Blair',
 'Melanne Verveer',
 'Arturo Valenzuela',
 'Strobe Talbott',
 'Betsy Ebeling',
 'Capricia Marshall',
 'Samuel (\\Sandy\\") Berger"',
 'William Burns',
 'Burns Strider',
 'Andrew Shapiro',
 'rooneym@state.gov',
 'Lissa Muscatine',
 'Kris Balderston',
 'Barbara Mikulski',
 'Kurt Campbell',
 'Judith McHale',
 'Marty Torrey',
 'Rodriguez Miguel',
 'Lynn Forester de Rothschild',
 'Maggie Williams',
 'Tomicah Tillemann',
 'Courtney Beale',
 'Ellen Tauscher',
 'Bill Clinton',
 'Mark Penn',
 'Michael Fuchs',
 'Nora Toiv',
 'Doug Hattaway',
 'Phillip Crowley',
 'Philip Gordon',
 'Maria Otero',
 'Harold Hongju Koh',
 'KellyC@state.gov',
 'James Steinberg',
 'Jacob Lew',
 'Todd Stern',
 'Rajiv Shah',
 'Esther Brimmer',
 'Oscar Flores',
 'Barack Obama',
 'Daniel',
 'Jennifer Robinson',
 'Janice Jacobs',
 'Voda Ebeling',
 'Neera Tanden',
 'Susan Rice',
 'Daniel Schwerin',
 'aclb',
 'William Hubbard',
 'Michael Posner',
 'John Olver',
 'Bonnie Klehr',
 'Han Duk-soo',
 'Kent Conrad',
 'Doug Band',
 'Philip Crowley',
 'LGraham',
 'Carlos Pascual',
 'Michele Bond',
 'Justin Cooper',
 'Christopher Edwards',
 'Suzanne Grantham',
 'United States of America',
 'Govenman Etazini',
 'Mark Hyman',
 'Luzzatto',
 'Oscar Lores',
 'Daniel Baer',
 'Jeffrey Feltman',
 'macmanusje2@state.gov',
 'harry.b.harris',
 'adamsds@state.gov',
 'judithmchale',
 'sheldon_whitehouse2@whitehouse.senate.gov',
 'jvillarreal',
 'wellsag@state.gov',
 'haroldnaughton',
 'Wendy Sherman',
 'Johnnie Carson',
 'thomas_e._donilon',
 'ros-lehtinen',
 'Thomas Nides',
 'jalili, saeed',
 'eeas',
 'ashton, catherine margaret',
 'monrovia',
 'patterson, anne w',
 'Thomas Donilon',
 'shermanwr@state.gov',
 'klang',
 'dennis_b._ross',
 'haledm2@state.gov',
 'andrea_j_palm',
 'jkeane',
 'mitchellg@state.gov',
 'Lanny Davis',
 'samuelson, heather f',
 'samuelson, heather',
 'soros, jonathan',
 'ross, dennis b.',
 'bin abd al-aziz al saud, abdullah',
 'S',
 'woodardew2@state.gov',
 'gentlemen',
 'Recos',
 'sullivanjj@state/gov',
 'wilson, joseph',
 'record',
 'pelosi, nancy',
 'valerie',
 'bosworth, steve',
 'reid, harry',
 'Miguel Rodriguez',
 'lieutenant colonel alfredo najera',
 'Claire Coleman',
 'abedinh@state;gov',
 'senjohnkerry',
 'Robert Hormats',
 'kussa',
 'davidson, jon',
 'pascualc@state.gov',
 'schu',
 'donilon, tom',
 'thomas.r.pickering',
 'martilla, john',
 'mission pk',
 'kissinger, henry',
 'komorowski, bronislaw',
 'mon',
 'crocker, bathsheba n',
 'powellnj@state.gov',
 'carpentermv@state.gov',
 'Diane Reynolds',
 'lrobinson',
 'cfalvo@usaid.gov',
 'stockjs@state.gov',
 'pattersonaw@state.gov',
 'klain, ron',
 'goosby, eric',
 'mspence',
 'kennedypf@state.gov',
 'whom it may concern',
 'Gorden Gray',
 'joe',
 'friedd@state.gov',
 'rshah@usaid.gov',
 'diane, reynolds',
 'secretary of state for foreign and commonwealth affairs',
 'joseph.wilson',
 'Biography',
 'Hill',
 'Maura Pally',
 'Huma Abedin; Hillary Clinton',
 'Hillary Clinton; Philippe Reines',
 'Peter Robinson',
 'Rosemarie Howe',
 'Sir',
 'Kabul LGF Request',
 'WHADP',
 'Ban Ki-moon',
 'ASUNCION',
 'rrh.interiors',
 'Laurie Rubiner',
 'David Axelrod',
 'John Podesta',
 'Rick Sloan',
 'mhcaleja@state.gov',
 'l',
 'Brian Greenspun',
 'mh.interiors',
 'Jim Kennedy',
 'Council on Foreign Relations',
 'Rosemarie Howe ;Hillary Clinton',
 'Rene Preval',
 'Donald',
 'Cheryl Mills ;Hillary Clinton',
 'Karl Eikenberry',
 'Tina Flournoy',
 'Jan Piercy',
 'Derek Chollet',
 'David Garten',
 'Jeffrey Farrow',
 'Michele Flournoy',
 'Cheryl',
 'Department of State',
 'Lourdes Cue',
 'Gina Glantz',
 'Christopher Hill',
 'Lisa Caputo',
 'Richard Holbrooke',
 'Nancy Parrish',
 'Scott Gration',
 'Thomas Shannon',
 'Terry Duffy',
 'preines;h',
 'fernandez, richard r',
 'mayor_re',
 'rverma',
 'davisjl4@state.gov',
 'sullilvanjj@state.gov',
 'pathfinder',
 'bshillady',
 'r_m_gates',
 'robert.kagan',
 'jilliscol',
 'jamesprubin',
 'penal@state.gov',
 'humamabedin',
 'rossaj@state.gov',
 'sandmw@state.gov',
 'DanielJJ@state.gov',
 'davidmilibandpersonal',
 'varma, vivek',
 'Joanne Laszczych',
 'mmonroe',
 'dhattaway',
 'dross',
 'alec.ross',
 'adlerce@state.gov',
 'tina.brownny',
 'feldmandf@state.gov',
 'mmoore',
 'kkazzarelli',
 'jacobsonrs@state.gov',
 'mfuchs.mike',
 'roy.spence',
 'kktowns',
 'rrussony',
 'flournoy, tina',
 'grossmanmi@state.gov',
 'jhuber2606',
 'barnett, robert b',
 'jillichtman',
 'chairman',
 'jonrdavidson',
 'David Hale',
 'shapiro, daniel b',
 'rubin, james p',
 'kruzich, joseph',
 'Robert Blake',
 'shongole37',
 'congress',
 'haillary',
 'millcd@state.gov',
 'haiti dlc distro',
 'munter, cameron p',
 'list',
 'see distribution',
 'Eric Woodard',
 'valenzuela,arturo a',
 'stephen.roach',
 'Patrick Kennedy',
 'edelman, marty',
 'habedin',
 'nyu-poly community',
 'spence, roy',
 'David Adams',
 'u.s. dept of state protocol',
 'murphy, terry b.',
 'sheeran, josette',
 'abedomj@state.gov',
 'blaker2@state.gov',
 'abbaszadehn@state.gov',
 'schwartzep@state.gov',
 'besty.ebeling@illinois.gov',
 'tyson',
 'meehanb@state.gov',
 'pennrhodeen',
 'nora.toiv',
 'jamierubin',
 'Yoweri Museveni',
 'Counselor',
 'David Miliband',
 'harold.koplewicz',
 'Joshua Daniel',
 'keith, adam e',
 'hunter, robert',
 'carroll, sean',
 'wen jiabao',
 'hyman, mark',
 'mcdonough, denis r',
 'united states mission to the united nations',
 'borns, jeff',
 'cdea, ambassador wayne',
 'io:edmonson, susan',
 'bondy, steve',
 'szubin, adam',
 'macaskill, kenny',
 'Megan Rooney',
 'Sung Kim',
 'Francis Ricciardone',
 'ALDAC',
 'Deborah Graze',
 'Member of Congress',
 'Judith',
 'Saxby Chambliss',
 'Walter Isaacson',
 'Kati Marton',
 'Yousaf Gilani',
 'Prime Minister',
 'Republican Members',
 'WoodardEW@state.gov',
 'Lois Quam',
 'Embassy of the Argentine Republic',
 'IRS',
 'Dan Schwerin',
 'george']
In [43]:
emailids
Out[43]:
[]
In [44]:
lenemail = len(emailids)
In [45]:
cehid = list()
In [46]:
for emiz in range(0,lenemail):
    #print(emailids[emiz]
    cehid.append(emailids[emiz])
    #print(emailids)
In [47]:
for ceh in emailids:
    #print(ceh)
    print(len(ceh))
    #print(json.loads(ceh)[0]['id'])
    #for em in ceh:
        #print(em)
In [48]:
emiz
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
NameError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-48-5311b48095a6> in <module>()
----> 1 emiz

NameError: name 'emiz' is not defined
In [49]:
type(emailids)
Out[49]:
list
In [50]:
emailaddy = ('https://www.wikileaks.org/clinton-emails/emailid/')
In [51]:
emadlis = list()
In [52]:
emailids
Out[52]:
[]
In [ ]:
 
In [53]:
for ema in emailids:
    #print(ema)
    jsema = (json.loads(ema))
    
    #print(jsema[0]['id'])
    print(jsema[0])
    emadlis.append(jsema[0])
    #print(emadlis[(jsema[0])])
    #for em in ema:
    #    print(em)
In [54]:
random.randint(0,10)
Out[54]:
10
In [ ]:
 
In [55]:
emadlis[0]['id']
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
IndexError                                Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-55-a94019f4992f> in <module>()
----> 1 emadlis[0]['id']

IndexError: list index out of range
In [56]:
import bs4
In [57]:
bs4.BeautifulSoup()
/usr/lib/python3/dist-packages/bs4/__init__.py:181: UserWarning: No parser was explicitly specified, so I'm using the best available HTML parser for this system ("lxml"). This usually isn't a problem, but if you run this code on another system, or in a different virtual environment, it may use a different parser and behave differently.

The code that caused this warning is on line 193 of the file /usr/lib/python3.5/runpy.py. To get rid of this warning, change code that looks like this:

 BeautifulSoup([your markup])

to this:

 BeautifulSoup([your markup], "lxml")

  markup_type=markup_type))
Out[57]:

In [ ]:
 
In [58]:
#for emaz in emadlis:
    #print(emaz['id'])
#    thema = (emailaddy + str(emaz['id']))
#    getema = requests.get(thema)
#    bstxt = (bs4.BeautifulSoup(getema.text))
#    print(bstxt.find_all('p'))
    #print(bs4.BeautifulSoup(getema))
In [59]:
reqrecipt = ('https://www.leaksapi.com/clinton-emails/to/8a52166f-1ff2-4060-9215-3583895df339/')
In [60]:
reqem = ('https://www.leaksapi.com/clinton-emails/id/8a52166f-1ff2-4060-9215-3583895df339/1')
In [61]:
reqem
Out[61]:
'https://www.leaksapi.com/clinton-emails/id/8a52166f-1ff2-4060-9215-3583895df339/1'
In [62]:
rqg = requests.get(reqem)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
SSLError                                  Traceback (most recent call last)
/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/connectionpool.py in urlopen(self, method, url, body, headers, retries, redirect, assert_same_host, timeout, pool_timeout, release_conn, chunked, body_pos, **response_kw)
    599                                                   body=body, headers=headers,
--> 600                                                   chunked=chunked)
    601 

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/connectionpool.py in _make_request(self, conn, method, url, timeout, chunked, **httplib_request_kw)
    344         try:
--> 345             self._validate_conn(conn)
    346         except (SocketTimeout, BaseSSLError) as e:

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/connectionpool.py in _validate_conn(self, conn)
    843         if not getattr(conn, 'sock', None):  # AppEngine might not have  `.sock`
--> 844             conn.connect()
    845 

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/connection.py in connect(self)
    325             server_hostname=hostname,
--> 326             ssl_context=context)
    327 

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/util/ssl_.py in ssl_wrap_socket(sock, keyfile, certfile, cert_reqs, ca_certs, server_hostname, ssl_version, ciphers, ssl_context, ca_cert_dir)
    324     if HAS_SNI:  # Platform-specific: OpenSSL with enabled SNI
--> 325         return context.wrap_socket(sock, server_hostname=server_hostname)
    326 

/usr/lib/python3.5/ssl.py in wrap_socket(self, sock, server_side, do_handshake_on_connect, suppress_ragged_eofs, server_hostname)
    384                          server_hostname=server_hostname,
--> 385                          _context=self)
    386 

/usr/lib/python3.5/ssl.py in __init__(self, sock, keyfile, certfile, server_side, cert_reqs, ssl_version, ca_certs, do_handshake_on_connect, family, type, proto, fileno, suppress_ragged_eofs, npn_protocols, ciphers, server_hostname, _context)
    759                         raise ValueError("do_handshake_on_connect should not be specified for non-blocking sockets")
--> 760                     self.do_handshake()
    761 

/usr/lib/python3.5/ssl.py in do_handshake(self, block)
    995                 self.settimeout(None)
--> 996             self._sslobj.do_handshake()
    997         finally:

/usr/lib/python3.5/ssl.py in do_handshake(self)
    640         """Start the SSL/TLS handshake."""
--> 641         self._sslobj.do_handshake()
    642         if self.context.check_hostname:

SSLError: [SSL: CERTIFICATE_VERIFY_FAILED] certificate verify failed (_ssl.c:720)

During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred:

SSLError                                  Traceback (most recent call last)
/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/adapters.py in send(self, request, stream, timeout, verify, cert, proxies)
    437                     retries=self.max_retries,
--> 438                     timeout=timeout
    439                 )

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/packages/urllib3/connectionpool.py in urlopen(self, method, url, body, headers, retries, redirect, assert_same_host, timeout, pool_timeout, release_conn, chunked, body_pos, **response_kw)
    629             clean_exit = False
--> 630             raise SSLError(e)
    631 

SSLError: [SSL: CERTIFICATE_VERIFY_FAILED] certificate verify failed (_ssl.c:720)

During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred:

SSLError                                  Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-62-6958588200e9> in <module>()
----> 1 rqg = requests.get(reqem)

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/api.py in get(url, params, **kwargs)
     70 
     71     kwargs.setdefault('allow_redirects', True)
---> 72     return request('get', url, params=params, **kwargs)
     73 
     74 

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/api.py in request(method, url, **kwargs)
     56     # cases, and look like a memory leak in others.
     57     with sessions.Session() as session:
---> 58         return session.request(method=method, url=url, **kwargs)
     59 
     60 

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/sessions.py in request(self, method, url, params, data, headers, cookies, files, auth, timeout, allow_redirects, proxies, hooks, stream, verify, cert, json)
    516         }
    517         send_kwargs.update(settings)
--> 518         resp = self.send(prep, **send_kwargs)
    519 
    520         return resp

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/sessions.py in send(self, request, **kwargs)
    637 
    638         # Send the request
--> 639         r = adapter.send(request, **kwargs)
    640 
    641         # Total elapsed time of the request (approximately)

/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/requests/adapters.py in send(self, request, stream, timeout, verify, cert, proxies)
    510         except (_SSLError, _HTTPError) as e:
    511             if isinstance(e, _SSLError):
--> 512                 raise SSLError(e, request=request)
    513             elif isinstance(e, ReadTimeoutError):
    514                 raise ReadTimeout(e, request=request)

SSLError: [SSL: CERTIFICATE_VERIFY_FAILED] certificate verify failed (_ssl.c:720)
In [ ]:
rqg.text
In [ ]:
 
In [ ]:
 
In [63]:
#[subnam.strip() for s in subnam['1:-1'].split(',')]
In [64]:
snm = subnam.replace('[]', "")
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
NameError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-64-c7ddd4ec9f92> in <module>()
----> 1 snm = subnam.replace('[]', "")

NameError: name 'subnam' is not defined
In [65]:
type(snm)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
NameError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-65-c269d558f63e> in <module>()
----> 1 type(snm)

NameError: name 'snm' is not defined
In [66]:
snmz = list(snm)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
NameError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-66-9f7a2b5b746f> in <module>()
----> 1 snmz = list(snm)

NameError: name 'snm' is not defined
In [67]:
giphypop.random_gif()
/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/giphypop.py:241: UserWarning: You are using the giphy public api key. This should be used for testing only and may be deactivated in the future. See https://github.com/Giphy/GiphyAPI.
  warnings.warn('You are using the giphy public api key. This '
Out[67]:
GiphyImage<gVPG3OcKQnwQw> at https://giphy.com/gifs/school-the-adventures-of-pete-and-gVPG3OcKQnwQw
In [68]:
trusear = giphypop.search('trump')
/usr/local/lib/python3.5/dist-packages/giphypop.py:241: UserWarning: You are using the giphy public api key. This should be used for testing only and may be deactivated in the future. See https://github.com/Giphy/GiphyAPI.
  warnings.warn('You are using the giphy public api key. This '
In [69]:
trumplist = list()
In [ ]:
 
In [70]:
for tru in trusear:
    #print(tru.media_url)
    trumplist.append(tru.media_url)
In [71]:
random.choice(trumplist)
Out[71]:
'https://media1.giphy.com/media/rzKSHEMN0lVkc/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3'
In [ ]:
 
In [72]:
trumplist
Out[72]:
['https://media1.giphy.com/media/hPPx8yk3Bmqys/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media3.giphy.com/media/3oKIPf1BaBDILVxbYA/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media3.giphy.com/media/mpfMDb6MB6EWQ/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media3.giphy.com/media/l0Iyau7QcKtKUYIda/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media3.giphy.com/media/wJNGA01o1Zxp6/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media0.giphy.com/media/HWkZuvTJw95vi/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media3.giphy.com/media/ASzK5wWjMtc6A/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media2.giphy.com/media/xTiTnHXbRoaZ1B1Mo8/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media3.giphy.com/media/xUNen16DFqlM6v6DEQ/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media0.giphy.com/media/E0MM3wqMMCQN2/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media3.giphy.com/media/BcFuckdngP0ly/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media2.giphy.com/media/Qjmp5vKEERPyw/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media3.giphy.com/media/l4FGuhL4U2WyjdkaY/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media0.giphy.com/media/10S1a1PhRypYn6/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media2.giphy.com/media/l0IyjW9mwj2Gl5kEo/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media1.giphy.com/media/psnG8iKvm5lo4/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media2.giphy.com/media/l46CahdcL5yYTaQiQ/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media1.giphy.com/media/t6HA09rAltIpq/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media2.giphy.com/media/zqA62x7MnjmaA/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media0.giphy.com/media/l2R0aIkYUXywiDMdO/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media2.giphy.com/media/xT8qBvVrX0wuuItpFm/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media1.giphy.com/media/bXE0iECrH9xJe/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media3.giphy.com/media/z619OZp86JaBG/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media1.giphy.com/media/rzKSHEMN0lVkc/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3',
 'https://media0.giphy.com/media/jgsGcrYmUl7q0/giphy.gif?fingerprint=e1bb72ff59ae8aa776516d6867c487f3']
In [ ]:
 

thecatjson

The Cat Json

Returns json result of random cat images instead of xml

In [26]:
import json
import requests
import xmltodict
from flask import Flask, jsonify
from flask_restful import Resource, Api
import random
In [27]:
app = Flask(__name__)
api = Api(app)
In [28]:
catreq = (requests.get('http://thecatapi.com/api/images/get?format=xml&results_per_page=50'))
In [29]:
catxt = catreq.text
In [30]:
catdict = xmltodict.parse(catxt)
In [31]:
caim = catdict['response']['data']['images']['image']
In [32]:
class HelloWorld(Resource):
    def get(self):
        jsdump = caim[random.randint(0,49)]

        return (json.loads(json.dumps(jsdump)))
In [33]:
api.add_resource(HelloWorld, '/')
In [34]:
if __name__ == '__main__':
    app.run(debug=True)
An exception has occurred, use %tb to see the full traceback.

SystemExit: 1
To exit: use 'exit', 'quit', or Ctrl-D.
In [ ]:
 

akl-uni-comps

auckland university computers

exploring the auckland university SIT API

In [6]:
import requests
import json
In [3]:
labreqmach = requests.get('http://www.fos.auckland.ac.nz/api/lab/machines/1.json')
In [8]:
labmachdic = json.loads(labreqmach.text)
In [12]:
lenmach = len(labmachdic)
In [15]:
labmachdic[lenmach]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
IndexError                                Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-15-9b063b18b537> in <module>()
----> 1 labmachdic[lenmach]

IndexError: list index out of range
In [28]:
for labm in range(0, lenmach):
    print(labmachdic[labm]['ip'])
10.103.139.124
10.103.139.123
10.103.139.122
10.103.139.121
10.103.139.120
10.103.139.119
10.103.139.118
10.103.139.117
10.103.139.116
10.103.139.115
10.103.139.114
10.103.139.113
10.103.139.112
10.103.139.111
10.103.139.110
10.103.139.109
10.103.139.108
10.103.139.107
10.103.139.106
10.103.139.105
10.103.139.104
10.103.139.103
10.103.139.102
10.103.139.101
10.103.139.100
10.103.139.99
10.103.139.98
10.103.139.97
10.103.139.96
10.103.139.95
10.103.139.94
10.103.139.93
10.103.139.92
10.103.139.91
10.103.139.90
10.103.139.89
10.103.139.88
10.103.139.87
10.103.139.86
10.103.139.85
10.103.139.84
10.103.139.83
10.103.139.82
10.103.139.81
10.103.139.80
10.103.139.79
10.103.139.78
10.103.139.77
10.103.139.76
10.103.139.75
10.103.139.74
10.103.139.73
10.103.139.72
10.103.139.71
10.103.139.70
10.103.139.69
10.103.139.68
10.103.139.67
10.103.139.66
10.103.139.65
10.103.139.64
10.103.139.63
10.103.139.62
10.103.139.61
10.103.139.60
10.103.139.59
10.103.139.58
10.103.139.57
10.103.139.56
10.103.139.55
10.103.139.54
10.103.139.53
10.103.139.52
10.103.139.51
10.103.139.50
10.103.139.49
10.103.139.48
10.103.139.47
10.103.139.46
10.103.139.45
10.103.139.44
10.103.139.43
10.103.139.42
10.103.139.41
10.103.139.40
10.103.139.39
10.103.139.38
10.103.139.37
10.103.139.36
10.103.139.35
10.103.139.34
10.103.139.33
10.103.139.32
10.103.139.31
10.103.139.30
10.103.139.29
10.103.139.28
10.103.139.27
10.103.139.26
10.103.139.25
10.103.139.24
10.103.139.23
10.103.139.22
10.103.139.21
10.103.139.20
10.103.139.19
10.103.139.18
10.103.139.17
10.103.139.16
10.103.139.15
10.103.139.14
10.103.139.13
10.103.139.12
10.103.139.11
10.103.139.10
10.103.139.9
10.103.139.8
10.103.139.7
10.103.139.6
10.103.139.5
10.103.139.4
10.103.139.3
10.103.139.2
10.103.139.1
10.103.139.126
In [29]:
labdet = requests.get('http://www.fos.auckland.ac.nz/api/lab/current_usage/1.json')
In [31]:
labdet.text
Out[31]:
'[{"machines_in_use": 56, "name": "FCL", "current_tutorial": null, "next_tutorial": null, "total_machines": 125, "id": 1, "closed": false, "timestamp": "2016/10/11 18:57:21 +1300", "room": "303s-191"}]'
In [ ]:
 
In [ ]:
 
In [ ]:
 
In [ ]:
 
In [25]:
for labm in range(0, lenmach):
    print(labmachdic[labm]['in_use'])
    #if True in (labmachdic[labm]['in_use']):
    #    print(labmachdic[labm]['in_use'])
False
False
False
False
False
False
True
False
True
False
True
True
True
False
True
True
False
False
False
True
True
False
True
False
False
False
False
False
True
False
False
True
True
False
False
True
True
True
True
True
False
False
True
True
True
True
False
False
True
False
False
True
True
False
False
False
True
False
False
False
False
False
False
True
False
False
False
True
True
False
False
False
True
False
True
False
True
True
False
False
False
True
False
True
False
True
True
True
False
True
False
True
True
False
True
True
True
True
True
True
False
True
True
True
False
False
False
False
True
True
True
False
False
False
False
False
True
True
False
True
False
False
False
False
False
In [ ]:
 
In [ ]:
 
In [ ]:
 
In [ ]:
 
In [ ]:
 
In [ ]:
 
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In [ ]:
 
In [ ]:
 
In [ ]:
 
In [ ]:
 

testtesla

Control Tesla Cars

Test setting temp based on local weather.

driver_temp=

passenger_temp=

This is a delivery system. replace buses in cities with electrical cars. These cars run the same route as buses.

Going to change the radio

More indepth Tesla car stats. Returns the Raspberry Pi media system onboard that is used to stream media to the car. Pluhs in to the cars stero. Allows passangers in the bar to reclievve calls. Broadcast wifi. Each car has its own router that it uses to comm with the outside world. Canera t oo report how everything is goiing. If things are wrong realtime images of what is happening. The ability to for remote login and control. HAM Radio broadcast. Each car is broadcasting a media center that offers storage space and media. You are able to connect to any of these Tesla cars and access the services they offer. If for some reason they are not to total standards then you can retry.

Nux the

Switch between low and high heat.

passanger temp

config file with times to auto start the car. driverless commands. sync to meetup and drive to where the meetups are happening

{ "response": { "inside_temp": 17.0, // degC inside car "outside_temp": 9.5, // degC outside car or null "driver_temp_setting": 22.6, // degC of driver temperature setpoint "passenger_temp_setting": 22.6, // degC of passenger temperature setpoint "is_auto_conditioning_on": false, // apparently even if on "is_front_defroster_on": null, // null or boolean as integer? "is_rear_defroster_on": false, "fan_status": 0 // fan speed 0-6 or null } }

In [2]:
import json
#import nose
from cryptography.fernet import Fernet
import getpass
import pandas
In [ ]:
myusr = getpass.getuser()
In [7]:
tespas = getpass.getpass('PASSWORD ')
PASSWORD ········
In [9]:
mydict = ({ "response": { "df": False, "dr": False, "pf": False, "pr": False, "ft": False, "rt": False, "car_verson": "1.19.42", "locked": True, "sun_roof_installed": False, "sun_roof_state": "unknown", "sun_roof_percent_open": 0, "dark_rims": False, "wheel_type": "Base19", "has_spoiler": False, "roof_color": "Colored", "perf_config": "Base" } })
In [10]:
tespas
Out[10]:
'test'
In [11]:
pandas.DataFrame(mydict)
Out[11]:
response
car_verson 1.19.42
dark_rims False
df False
dr False
ft False
has_spoiler False
locked True
perf_config Base
pf False
pr False
roof_color Colored
rt False
sun_roof_installed False
sun_roof_percent_open 0
sun_roof_state unknown
wheel_type Base19
In [16]:
key = Fernet.generate_key()

f = Fernet(key)
token = f.encrypt(b'straz')
print(token)
'...'
f.decrypt(token)
b'gAAAAABX-5fRdIVRQf8vPSMZGEa7MW1Y9kxc5gv5XAUB9bHf0482Bk6vYuO-4Jy1zpfLTR7azjJew_JBh92cqrZ9Fw931daYaQ=='
Out[16]:
b'straz'
In [17]:
key
Out[17]:
b'z-FQnyhiZIL6ZWxd5tUCWxYaHQaEK4KFPlIshGKRgBM='
In [18]:
tesveh = 'https://owner-api.teslamotors.com/api/1/vehicles/1/command/remote_start_drive?password='
In [19]:
tesveh
Out[19]:
'https://owner-api.teslamotors.com/api/1/vehicles/1/command/remote_start_drive?password='
In [21]:
#from urllib2 import Request, urlopen

#headers = {
#  'Authorization': 'Bearer {access_token}'
#}
#request = Request('https://owner-api.teslamotors.com/api/1/vehicles/1/command/remote_start_drive?password=edisonsux', headers=headers)

#response_body = urlopen(request).read()
#print response_body
In [22]:
doorquen = (mydict['response']['df'], mydict['response']['dr'], mydict['response']['pf'], mydict['response']['pr'])
In [23]:
doorquen
Out[23]:
(False, False, False, False)
In [24]:
key
Out[24]:
b'z-FQnyhiZIL6ZWxd5tUCWxYaHQaEK4KFPlIshGKRgBM='
In [26]:
keyencr = f.encrypt(key)
In [27]:
keyencr
Out[27]:
b'gAAAAABX-5gkD9fwfYgaYhD3L-JLdwX9RTHr2cezBZTJ5zgyJCSzbJnNZznkB0DAY6ka5sfsbqoEZ5jOyryU_gXxvd38H3k5o_r1KRF7DecTPHb_wVspVd9XLw9q3jLr1NF_nVBxgBAW'
In [28]:
f.decrypt(token)
Out[28]:
b'straz'
In [29]:
TESLACONFIG = ('TESLA CONTROL BRUM BRUM')
In [30]:
print(TESLACONFIG)
TESLA CONTROL BRUM BRUM
In [ ]:
 
In [31]:
passwrdz = getpass.getpass("PASSWORD ENTER ")

askmileorkilo = input('AMERICAN SETTINGS Y/n ')

setlowtemp = input('DRIVER LOW TEMP SET AS: ')

sethightemp = input('DRIVER HIGH TEMP SET AS: ')


setpasslow = input('PASS LOW TEMP SET AS: ')

setpashight = input('PASS HIGH TEMP SET AS: ')

openDriversDoor = input('OPEN DRIVERS DOOR Y/n ')

unlockcar = input('UNLOCK CAR Y/n ')

valetmode = input('VALET MODE Y/n ')

valetpass = getpass.getpass('4 PIN NUMBER: ')
PASSWORD ENTER ········
AMERICAN SETTINGS Y/n Y
DRIVER LOW TEMP SET AS: 12
DRIVER HIGH TEMP SET AS: 15
PASS LOW TEMP SET AS: 10
PASS HIGH TEMP SET AS: 16
OPEN DRIVERS DOOR Y/n Y
UNLOCK CAR Y/n Y
VALET MODE Y/n Y
4 PIN NUMBER: ········
In [32]:
passwrdz
Out[32]:
'qwe'
In [33]:
valint = int(valetpass)
In [34]:
SETCURRENTZ = input('Current from -1 to 1: ')
Current from -1 to 1: 1
In [35]:
flsecur = float(SETCURRENTZ)
In [36]:
flsecur
Out[36]:
1.0
In [37]:
int(SETCURRENTZ)
Out[37]:
1
In [39]:
import cryptography
In [183]:
#fercypo = cryptography.fernet()

{ "portal_url": "https://owner-api.teslamotors.com/api/1/vehicles/", "stream_url": "https://streaming.vn.teslamotors.com/stream/", "username": "yourMyTeslaLogin@email.com", "password": "yourPassword", "output_file": "stream_output.txt" }

In [41]:
f.generate_key()
Out[41]:
b'Fy3UWE2Hg_dfPQMi34D3_3wsa5Fnxl0iTCXWHm3E5qs='
In [43]:
token = f.encrypt(bytes(valint))
In [44]:
print(token)
b'gAAAAABX-5iJmrFOHgUji6u3hkGCofgKBsmWq7p4Iftoxj7AHyf_SHAA_v7voz5NXOvqu2ptTeqmhkxaR3YWTBitoZVK47IxcdBRII_hb8JzileS9naLjnLuDjmmFSh0zGMmvFZELJdxOQeEBDDP6kl7UMiWkFTl_y3NK0hk_BsicG3kSqbRQvmuo7Yvz6wBb7LPMMOIpCFlMK5Xqyd4Eyv20_y2qTrdR7KwbPKyXeYSHS8DSp0JWO72rRqAfGUJehV9oI1JVeofLrakjHYiubOVHvDDcIs0H9HPulbyVUSrF1VDb-ct4WQPVdkrosuHfA2bJT_t5WtA6zr4kKSS6DpenC8G6-bAAfaLdLZ2qraZJlbCmDJ3C4zL7AgWDA98hmtDN3X-mR2NCcleHqM0X8reNxD8O-VJiTZOxUkOS2Piyo32lI4FpNgnSGrjFaIE3JAWjyyHHXWQBysTi5S8fkGX9Fc--szZnKaZ7FFu-7HHOSw4G1WwU4LVaG6ibfB43-qacA8B_EpV711AT_vmugjUk933eHH3IO4uJmFSap1nSwcaWzgEF41hsBDtPxxifDDBOclAz0aIwqJpq4PWmxMdL3iXsEEl6GHiTerbixHvBVqVoxbjMgEo2x6ULH9cJJW0Bv5wQEsJFAej-Uf2y4HgGLVrMJS1gcze7AYqGO5n5jsLB9KEbD3ZYg6xBm6mZe4eQbfizf7AGLJW_qLK_T22UohS-Wtt47wyFiZ2_NUEz5vm77f9UkfjQuOSJnJ52jpsUL9XBcjH4er_W61yMpaHU14lSJa5hjWiB15iq0Fah-fv_nmHdLS6v8u7nSnBsoNG5Z4paVn_joBFD7eERdWCCLl09Y7T8SLp9wq6M7_I6KOceJYht_6xIPImDcthtRg1G5nzQj52u4QMG0YioEfVxO9F7-ocbo3Irva_uhmoao23l0Mnt_YfrEr5erL_xxtFsfI1N1rs8V2Ki7yxrg2hFVTcXkv4z6v2ovfAHASJaWNSzw1406JveN-ZDCJBQvCI2kHqFDcsmN4zHktQnJmkG2TZteO3cJA30aD7EMqbGDYv5WWh0JQplNrqg-dg9ZOD1L8hqeVjmqv8_yOxFVm12e6TeW2LXADerdCML67DdfHh0kjhTyGMSPdaLoPwk3gRbXnADsz9VCIAGQMnpyEcbnFYnLO4eDs5KeT01cBqF_T_A1EfFjgFVM9daBKfewHyI19DDmOWKFHPgY5p-5pDpt2v5zrwjJ8wrBFsGrotyH_A7bkpC2p4p1KcRoqf5u2NwJlCB6CKzdPyWdHbm-f9JQ_tLwpKmm0X0Lt11t9sf0ApVNFGEp6T3rd5f8nwEH7bq7OmCbXeLV5xmvqI1hX84MuLu2ZoRSflO1osmOfEeRlse3qvE8j0Jk-K4gDUH2BDlkUrUv5ij3KMqSDVR2oiPKl2Za9dT6wWPWMhzefvGjgkXZATzkPM4hVjaCA-6M6NNAMxlRLgTvrXwQTu3J3HZQ-8HPGn-ntUzx_RBSbHmHV4q63piREC_9SswFthJYoMCL4jY5lkHnsH-zKGC2x20nCib9QyiKYGQsFcCVq37CqPfUDCx-CVK2qjRO89dn9seFXaPI4Jsr4dGNHOt1Q3MSTCaeoMsODnpzwgjv4dq1r_utrOG_bMMac3Bg0JMsC_KWo8gxf_mVMvhERmZCizapav2geJtbJM5234X3SoDmqnAfQHPZxR5FpWVvo_8xoms2okByh2'
In [45]:
f.decrypt(token)
Out[45]:
b'\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00'
In [46]:
int.from_bytes((f.decrypt(token)), byteorder='big')
Out[46]:
0
In [47]:
byedecrpt = (f.decrypt(token))
In [48]:
int.from_bytes((byedecrpt), byteorder='big')
Out[48]:
0
In [50]:
if 'n' in valetmode:
    valeton = False
elif 'Y' in valetmode:
    valeton = True
    
In [52]:
if 'n' in askmileorkilo:
    miletru = False
elif 'Y' in askmileorkilo:
    miletru = True
In [53]:
askmileorkilo
Out[53]:
'Y'
In [54]:
miletru
Out[54]:
True
In [55]:
if miletru == True:
    guidisuni = "mi/hr"
elif miletru == False:
    guidisuni = "km/hr"
In [56]:
guidisuni
Out[56]:
'mi/hr'
In [57]:
if 'n' in unlockcar:
    opddor = False
elif 'Y' in unlockcar:
    opddor = True
In [58]:
opddor
Out[58]:
True
In [59]:
if 'n' in openDriversDoor:
    opddor = False
    
elif 'Y' in openDriversDoor:
    opddor = True
    
    
In [60]:
opddor
Out[60]:
True
In [61]:
import configparser
In [62]:
dfstat = (mydict['response']['df'])
In [63]:
pfstat = (mydict['response']['pf'])
In [64]:
prstat = (mydict['response']['pr'])
In [65]:
drstat = (mydict['response']['dr'])
In [66]:
drstat
Out[66]:
False
In [67]:
prstat
Out[67]:
False
In [68]:
dfstat
Out[68]:
False
In [69]:
pfstat
Out[69]:
False
In [70]:
import arrow
In [71]:
timnow = arrow.now()
In [72]:
print(timnow.datetime)
2016-10-11 02:34:18.627450+13:00
In [73]:
timnow.for_json()
Out[73]:
'2016-10-11T02:34:18.627450+13:00'
In [74]:
timnow.isoweekday()
Out[74]:
2
In [75]:
timnow.humanize()
Out[75]:
'just now'
In [76]:
timnow.isoweekday()
Out[76]:
2
In [77]:
timnow.isocalendar()
Out[77]:
(2016, 41, 2)
In [78]:
timnow.ceil
Out[78]:
<bound method Arrow.ceil of <Arrow [2016-10-11T02:34:18.627450+13:00]>>
In [79]:
timnow.clone()
Out[79]:
<Arrow [2016-10-11T02:34:18.627450+13:00]>
In [80]:
timnow.date()
Out[80]:
datetime.date(2016, 10, 11)
In [81]:
timnow.format()
Out[81]:
'2016-10-11 02:34:18+13:00'
In [82]:
timnow.floor
Out[82]:
<bound method Arrow.floor of <Arrow [2016-10-11T02:34:18.627450+13:00]>>
In [83]:
timnow.float_timestamp
Out[83]:
1476106458.62745
In [84]:
timz = timnow.for_json()
In [85]:
timz
Out[85]:
'2016-10-11T02:34:18.627450+13:00'
In [86]:
print(timz)
2016-10-11T02:34:18.627450+13:00
In [87]:
timz.upper()
Out[87]:
'2016-10-11T02:34:18.627450+13:00'
In [88]:
timz.split('-' and ':' and '.')
Out[88]:
['2016-10-11T02:34:18', '627450+13:00']
In [89]:
print(timnow)
2016-10-11T02:34:18.627450+13:00
In [90]:
timutc = timnow.utcnow()
In [ ]:
 
In [91]:
timnow.weekday()
Out[91]:
1
In [92]:
timnow.dst()
Out[92]:
datetime.timedelta(0, 3600)
In [93]:
timnow.ctime()
Out[93]:
'Tue Oct 11 02:34:18 2016'
In [95]:
arrow.util.total_seconds
Out[95]:
<function arrow.util._total_seconds_27>
In [96]:
arrow.api.factory
Out[96]:
<function arrow.api.factory>
In [97]:
artz = arrow.factory.tzinfo(timutc)
In [99]:
calcsee= arrow.locales.calendar.HTMLCalendar()
In [100]:
calcsee.formatmonth(2016, 5)
Out[100]:
'<table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="month">\n<tr><th colspan="7" class="month">May 2016</th></tr>\n<tr><th class="mon">Mon</th><th class="tue">Tue</th><th class="wed">Wed</th><th class="thu">Thu</th><th class="fri">Fri</th><th class="sat">Sat</th><th class="sun">Sun</th></tr>\n<tr><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="sun">1</td></tr>\n<tr><td class="mon">2</td><td class="tue">3</td><td class="wed">4</td><td class="thu">5</td><td class="fri">6</td><td class="sat">7</td><td class="sun">8</td></tr>\n<tr><td class="mon">9</td><td class="tue">10</td><td class="wed">11</td><td class="thu">12</td><td class="fri">13</td><td class="sat">14</td><td class="sun">15</td></tr>\n<tr><td class="mon">16</td><td class="tue">17</td><td class="wed">18</td><td class="thu">19</td><td class="fri">20</td><td class="sat">21</td><td class="sun">22</td></tr>\n<tr><td class="mon">23</td><td class="tue">24</td><td class="wed">25</td><td class="thu">26</td><td class="fri">27</td><td class="sat">28</td><td class="sun">29</td></tr>\n<tr><td class="mon">30</td><td class="tue">31</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td></tr>\n</table>\n'
In [101]:
arnow = arrow.now()
In [102]:
dayweekz = arnow.weekday()
In [103]:
dayweekz
Out[103]:
1
In [104]:
calcsee.getfirstweekday()
Out[104]:
0
In [105]:
calcsee.getfirstweekday()
Out[105]:
0
In [109]:
arnow.strftime('%M')
Out[109]:
'35'
In [110]:
arnow.strftime('%m')
Out[110]:
'10'
In [111]:
arnow.strftime('%Y %m')
Out[111]:
'2016 10'
In [ ]:
 
In [112]:
yrints = int(arnow.strftime('%Y'))
In [113]:
yrints
Out[113]:
2016
In [114]:
mondayfor = int(arnow.strftime('%m'))
In [115]:
mondayfor
Out[115]:
10
In [116]:
daydatye = int(arnow.strftime('%d'))
In [117]:
daydatye
Out[117]:
11
In [118]:
calcsee.formatday(2016, 1)
Out[118]:
'<td class="tue">2016</td>'
In [120]:
panread = pandas.read_html(calcsee.formatmonth(yrints, mondayfor))
In [121]:
panread[0]
Out[121]:
0 1 2 3 4 5 6
0 2016-10-11 NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT
1 2016-10-17 2016-10-11 2016-10-12 2016-10-13 2016-10-14 2016-10-15 2016-10-16
2 NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT
3 NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT
4 NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT
5 NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT
6 NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT
7 NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT NaT
In [122]:
calcsee.formatmonth(yrints, mondayfor)
Out[122]:
'<table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="month">\n<tr><th colspan="7" class="month">October 2016</th></tr>\n<tr><th class="mon">Mon</th><th class="tue">Tue</th><th class="wed">Wed</th><th class="thu">Thu</th><th class="fri">Fri</th><th class="sat">Sat</th><th class="sun">Sun</th></tr>\n<tr><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="sat">1</td><td class="sun">2</td></tr>\n<tr><td class="mon">3</td><td class="tue">4</td><td class="wed">5</td><td class="thu">6</td><td class="fri">7</td><td class="sat">8</td><td class="sun">9</td></tr>\n<tr><td class="mon">10</td><td class="tue">11</td><td class="wed">12</td><td class="thu">13</td><td class="fri">14</td><td class="sat">15</td><td class="sun">16</td></tr>\n<tr><td class="mon">17</td><td class="tue">18</td><td class="wed">19</td><td class="thu">20</td><td class="fri">21</td><td class="sat">22</td><td class="sun">23</td></tr>\n<tr><td class="mon">24</td><td class="tue">25</td><td class="wed">26</td><td class="thu">27</td><td class="fri">28</td><td class="sat">29</td><td class="sun">30</td></tr>\n<tr><td class="mon">31</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td><td class="noday">&nbsp;</td></tr>\n</table>\n'
In [125]:
import os
In [126]:
import random
In [ ]:
 
In [127]:
calcday = calcsee.cssclasses
In [128]:
calcday
Out[128]:
['mon', 'tue', 'wed', 'thu', 'fri', 'sat', 'sun']
In [129]:
calcfulday = ['Monday', 'Tuesday', 'Wednesday', 'Thursday', 'Friday', 'Saturday', 'Sunday']
In [130]:
len(calcfulday)
Out[130]:
7
In [ ]: